jjorge
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 12:12 am
Piffka wrote:
Hmmm. Does raisin pie have apples? I ought to look at my mom's old recipes and see just how she made 'em. She promised me there was no meat.



I don't think so, at least my grandmother's didn't have apples.

One might think that because raisins are so sweet, raisin pie might be TOO sweet. In fact, it is no sweeter than mince pie.

When I was a kid, the only days of the year when there was wine in the house were Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Except for certain ethnic groups ( eg. Italians), most working class families seldom drank wine and knew little about it.

My parents, always bought a bottle of port for Thanksgiving and Christmas which they served before and with the meal. We kids all got to drink a little glass and thought that was a big deal.
We felt very sophisticated. Smile
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 12:14 am
Being a well-brought-up Southern girl myself, we will of course have CORNBREAD dressing along with mashed sweet potatoes with miniature marshmallows on top, green beans with bacon, corn on the cob, and homemade pumpkin and apple pies with plenty of real whipped cream. Also smoked turkey (my husband prefers it to roasted, so I gave up), cranberry sauce with orange rind, plain turkey gravy (I can't stand giblets--nasty stuff), hot rolls with butter and honey, deviled eggs, and an assortment of everyone's favorite olives and pickles.

I must remember to make up a few gallons of iced tea, too.
0 Replies
 
jjorge
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 12:27 am
Sounds delicious Eva.

In recent years my step-daughter and I would take my Mom out to a restaurant for dinner. We liked a place in a hotel in Taunton Mass. about fifteen miles from mother's house. After dinner we'd usually take a drive over to Plymouth Mass. (about twenty miles) to take an annual look at Plymouth Rock etc.

In recent years there has been an annual protest/demonstration at Plymouth by groups of American Indians who call our 'Thanksgiving' a 'National Day of Mourning.'
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 08:47 am
Well Piffka - of the 17, 4 are children. Basically it is no different than cooking for say 4, just increase the amount of food and size of the turkey. I love to cook anyway - it is just difficult with two little ones clinging to your legs. It is also why I keep the menu simple. We usually buy the largest turkey we can find.

Taunton, Mass, jjorge. I had Thanksgiving dinner there last year - at my brother's house.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 08:56 am
Hi Eva. I'm sure your meal will be delicious. Last year, was the cycle at our friends and we had deep fried turkey. Pretty good but we're going traditional here. So you buy a smoked turkey and then heat it up? The deviled eggs sound yummy -- one of our favorites. Are they on the table as a sort of appetizer or just part of the regular meal?

...and no mushy green bean casserole or molded jello? Cjhsa's right --must be a midwest thing.

Will you share your green-bean and bacon secrets?

And please... how do you make cornbread stuffing? Will you put sausage in it? I love cornbread, it just seems strange as a stuffing. I've never had any that's leftover to use... doesn't happen in this house. Very Happy


Jjorge -- How cool to have a tradition looking at Plymouth Rock. A National Day of Mourning, huh? That sounds about right. I have a lot of sympathies for them.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 11:11 am
Love the Taunton references.

That is where the forum for the cracker recipes is based.

Raisin pie is a lot like Quebec sugar pie, and Canajun butter tarts. mmmmmmm
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 11:27 am
Piffka wrote:
Hi Eva. I'm sure your meal will be delicious. Last year, was the cycle at our friends and we had deep fried turkey. Pretty good but we're going traditional here. So you buy a smoked turkey and then heat it up? The deviled eggs sound yummy -- one of our favorites. Are they on the table as a sort of appetizer or just part of the regular meal?

...and no mushy green bean casserole or molded jello? Cjhsa's right --must be a midwest thing.

Will you share your green-bean and bacon secrets?

And please... how do you make cornbread stuffing? Will you put sausage in it? I love cornbread, it just seems strange as a stuffing. I've never had any that's leftover to use... doesn't happen in this house. Very Happy


This is the traditional holiday meal for my family, Piffka. Same as my mother made it. It's the only time we eat these foods, and it gives us a link with our past. I think that's very important. So I don't try new stuff for these important times. Plenty of time for that later, maybe with leftovers.

The only concession I've made is the smoked turkey instead of roasting one the old way. My husband and son MUCH prefer the smoked kind, and I admit I'd rather have that kind for sandwiches later.

The deviled eggs are always meant to go on the table with the meal, but only about half of them make it that long! (People keep stealing them out of the fridge.) The big argument is mayo vs. mustard. I make some of both.

Green beans must be fresh, simmered for several hours in a big pot with several strips of bacon. Simple, really. A lot of people here have green bean casserole, but that isn't my family's tradition. We do it the old-fashioned way.

Yes, we buy two small smoked turkeys at the local meat market (they have the best ones) and reheat them in the oven before the meal. One is sliced and arranged on a platter, and the other is used for the centerpiece until it is needed.

NO molded jello in MY house!!! (YUK!)

Cornbread dressing...never can make enough of it. 2/3 cornbread, 1/3 white bread...all crumbled and left out to dry overnight. Add chicken or turkey stock, onion, tiny bit of celery, poultry seasoning and a little bit of browned, crumbled sausage (some don't like it, so I go easy on the sausage.) Get the kind of bulk sausage used for breakfast patties. Big debate here is sage. Some love it. I don't, so I leave it out.

I've made myself hungry now. Laughing
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 01:26 pm
Eva -- What a nice idea to have a small smoked turkey as centerpiece. (May have to borrow that!)

I understand perfectly about wanting to have traditions that stay with you. I like that, but we also wanted to make some of our own... our little stamp on the world. Maybe some day my great-grandkids, if I am so lucky, will be making Italian stuffing ala Piffka.

The green beans and bacon are then drained and served, huh? What do you do with the water?

It sounds like your corned bread stuffing is a milder version of my stuffing. I think, btw, that poultry seasoning contains a lot of sage. Yep... just checked. Are you sure you don't like sage?

In our house deviled eggs have both mayo & mustard in about equal amounts. How can it be deviled without mustard, I'm wondering?


EhBeth -- I was thinking I'd seen Taunton somewhere just recently. Wink

Quebec sugar pie? Well.... tell us, please!
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 01:31 pm
Deviled eggs are best made with really tangy, cheap american yellow mustard. You can use the Dijon if you want, but they won't be as good.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 01:58 pm
Piffka wrote:
Eva -- What a nice idea to have a small smoked turkey as centerpiece. (May have to borrow that!)

I understand perfectly about wanting to have traditions that stay with you. I like that, but we also wanted to make some of our own... our little stamp on the world. Maybe some day my great-grandkids, if I am so lucky, will be making Italian stuffing ala Piffka.

The green beans and bacon are then drained and served, huh? What do you do with the water?

It sounds like your corned bread stuffing is a milder version of my stuffing. I think, btw, that poultry seasoning contains a lot of sage. Yep... just checked. Are you sure you don't like sage?

In our house deviled eggs have both mayo & mustard in about equal amounts. How can it be deviled without mustard, I'm wondering?


EhBeth -- I was thinking I'd seen Taunton somewhere just recently. Wink

Quebec sugar pie? Well.... tell us, please!


You're right, poultry seasoning does contain sage, but I only use a pinch of it. Some people put in lots, but I think it overpowers. Some say fresh sage is much better, but I've never tried it.

Deviled eggs can be made with just mayo, and people who don't like mustard love them. I make half that way, and the rest with the half mayo/half mustard mixture as you said. And yes, cjhsa, it has to be regular French's mustard. Dijon just isn't the same.

Your Italian stuffing DOES sound good, Piffka!

The water from the green beans & bacon? Hmm...never thought about it. It would probably make a good soup starter. Hmmmmmm........
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:18 pm
Yum, I have some extra eggs and I'm going to make some deviled eggs this afternoon. My daughter has been making them for the last few year, they've been delicious but I don't know what mustard she prefers. I think we have about six kinds of mustard here, maybe I should do a taste testing? I know her favorite thing is to sprinkle some paprika on for color. As far as I know, paprika is otherwise a fairly boring spice. Does it really have a flavor?
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:22 pm
There are many types of paprika. The very best are the Hungarian paprikas, sold hot or mild. One brand to look for is Szeged.

Paprika is pure chile powder.
0 Replies
 
blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:22 pm
Piffka wrote:
Yum, I have some extra eggs and I'm going to make some deviled eggs this afternoon. My daughter has been making them for the last few year, they've been delicious but I don't know what mustard she prefers. I think we have about six kinds of mustard here, maybe I should do a taste testing? I know her favorite thing is to sprinkle some paprika on for color. As far as I know, paprika is otherwise a fairly boring spice. Does it really have a flavor?


make 'em with Chinese Hot Mustard.....yee haw!!!!
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:43 pm
BPB -- I love that HOT stuff but I dunno about with eggs. You think so??

Cjhsa -- I have Hungarian paprika, but it's mild. Maybe that's the problem.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:44 pm
I'd be more concerned about it being fresh, rather than mild vs. hot.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 02:54 pm
Hmmm. Well I'm planning on going to the Pike Place Market soon. I'll buy some fresh at my favorite spice shop and report back, OK?
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:00 pm
Sounds good. I love Pike Place Market.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:02 pm
Me, too.

Have just noticed your wine for T-day thread. Heading over.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 03:49 pm
Eva - fresh sage is awesome. I use it also with lamb and pork.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 04:02 pm
I am fortunate to have sage growing in my garden. At this time of the year it's a little sparse, but a little goes a long way.
0 Replies
 
 

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