cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 01:00 pm
panzade wrote:
Yeah, I was the first mate....your sis bought only Hellman's after that


Did you know that out west Hellman's is known as "Best Foods"? In fact, Best Foods Inc. owns the Hellman's brand.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 01:44 pm
Hi Pan -- These recipes have to easy enough for the tyro cooks in the household. The gourmet cooks here will faint, but these work for us.

The shrimp thing is ridiculously easy --
Lay some cream cheese (proper or not) onto a serving plate, cover with icy cold, cooked baby shrimps (ie. refrigerate that can overnight Wink ) and then artfully pour on your favorite cocktail sauce. Stick in a couple of spreaders & pass the crackers.

Green beans?
Fry several slices of bacon, remove & crumble or dice, pour out some of the grease, toss in some green beans (I usually use frozen whole baby green beans but French-cut canned beans will work as do fresh beans) & a little water. Stir it around and let them steam 'til they're cooked through. (Julia Child had a name for this, steam-sauté?) Pour vinagrette salad dressing over it and let that heat up. If you want to be really fancy, add some thinly sliced red pepper with the green beans.

This is a stuffing I came up with on my own. My mom taught me a more sedate version of bread & sausage that also included loads of melted butter, but there's none in this. It includes really good bread crumbs which I think is the most important ingredient of a bread stuffing. I dry them a little, but I don't worry too much about how dry they are. I don't use storebought bread crumbs -- they seem wasteful to me & bread just isn't that hard to cut up. I buy loaves of Italian, sour-dough and Asiago bread just for this, happy to get stale bread or whatever, plus I'll use any ends from the rye & ww breads that I may have diced up and stashed in the freezer. The bread crumbs are diced as small as I feel like and put into an amazingly large pan -- it is more than 2 feet across, but it makes it much easier to mix.

Meanwhile, I'll sauté 1# Italian ground sausage,
and 1# regular sausage (more than usual but it's a big turkey). Once those are mostly crumbled & beginning to brown, I'll pour off all the grease, replace some of it with olive oil & add a diced-up onion, 3-4 chopped shallots and a couple of minced garlic, plus several thinly sliced stalks of celery with as much of the inner leaf as possible.

I'll also be adding to the sauté a small handful of pine nuts, a lot of dried tomatoes (at least 1/2 cup), a cup or more of dried fruits -- chopped up apricots, prunes & cherries, and nearly a cup of grated fresh parmesan cheese -- the stuff I buy costs an arm & a leg. I like to use fresh sage, but fresh or dried... a good amount of that and some fresh ground pepper. No salt needed -- .
[size=8] look at all that parmesan! I take that off the fire and let it cool a little. I've added other ingredients in the past -- but these are the core that seems to work best. Last time I added a bunch of fresh basil that I'd preserved in olive oil.

In yet another bowl I'll mix up a couple of eggs with canned chicken broth. Then I add the sauté mix to the bread and stir it around and make sure it looks right (does it need more bread?) and finally add the liquid in bits. It should be moist but not sloppy. I stuff all that I can manage into the turkey. Whatever is left... I add another egg to the broth mix and add to that so it is much more moist and put into a deep pan covered with foil that can somehow fit into my oven with that turkey.[/size]

Blah, blah, blah... didn't mean to explain in such detail, but there you have it.

I'm worried about the turkey drying out... it is a 20.5# turkey. I'm thinking about cooking it upside down. <Perhaps holding it over the side of the skiff and letting it scream a while.>

I thought Hellman's owned Best Foods.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 01:48 pm
Thanks. I always wondered why they had to have two names.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 01:49 pm
Hey, my eyes are smarting...I need that stuffing recipe...it's what my Mom makes.
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 01:52 pm
My curiosity was piqued by the mayo question, because I grew up on Hellmann's. Here's what I found on their web site:

"It was nearly inevitable then, that in 1932, Richard Hellmann Inc., was acquired by Best Foods, Inc. To this day, Hellmann's® Mayonnaise is sold east of the Rockies and Best Foods® Mayonnaise is sold west."
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 01:54 pm
Right...but why?
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 02:11 pm
Why two names? My guess is that both were well known and liked in their regions. Made sense to keep the names that people knew...
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 02:42 pm
Pan, you can select that type and make it bigger if you want. I just didn't want to be so boring.

Re. mayo, in Tacoma, many preferred the local brand, Nalley's, though I'm sure it's been bought out.

My sister & I grew up on Miracle Whip and she'd bought it both on that seiner. She still says that MR makes the best potato salad.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 02:45 pm
Proper cream cheese.
That is most excellent news!
Very Happy


Jalapeno jelly with cream cheese on crackers (make the crackers yourself with your pasta machine Cool - your audience will freak at your brilliance) mmmmmmmmmmmmm
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 02:57 pm
I knew you'd like that, Beth. How did you know I have a pasta machine I never use? (Tell me a recipe, please, & I'll think whether I'd really have the time. My daughter & were dithering about what kind of cracker... pale, we thought, but not too crisp and nothing ordinary.)
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:02 pm
Growing up in the midwest, there as always a molded jello salad on the table at Thanksgiving. My wife hates the stuff, so it is no longer part of our holiday meal.

I swear though, if you ever go to midwestern gathering, or just read "Taste of Home", you'll always find molded salads. Some friends went back to Ohio a couple summers ago and that was their observation as well - molded jello salads were everywhere.
0 Replies
 
jjorge
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:09 pm
bookmark
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:12 pm
I remember eating a molded salad once. I think I was in Missouri... a strange Thanksgiving. The weather was weird and we had cornbread stuffing. My kids were young & nearly balked but they've been well-brought up Smile and received firm promises of "a real turkey" when we got home. There was something else really strange... a can of dried onions on a cream soup & green bean dish. Never heard of it before or had it since. I didn't care for it.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:12 pm
http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=14797.1

piffka - check this out


i was gonna link another thread featuring Mrs. SealPoet - but this one gets to the cracker recipe much faster. Of course the goal with these is crispy, which may not be your target.

They are, however, irresistible.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:14 pm
and check out the results when one of the posters at cooks talk made them

http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=14725.26
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:23 pm
Thanks, I've emailed that recipe to my daughter & to myself. I love seeds in crackers. The problem with having crackers that are too crisp is that the cream cheese & shrimp are heavy & need a cracker with body.


Edit/ add on -- Oh. They do sound like they must be good. You aren't "Noodle" are you, Beth? THought he/she had a funny signature.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:34 pm
That green bean dish with a can of mushroom soup and "onion rings" is a so called "classic". I hate it.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:36 pm
I'm the same person there as here, piff.
Noodle is another canajun there.

The cream cheese and shrimp can accompany the crackers. They don't have to be on top of crackers. Depending on the seasonings, those crackers can have a real full-bodied flavour.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 03:43 pm
Here's a link to the San Francisco Chronicle's "Classic Turkey" method, which describes the brining procedure I mentioned earlier.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/11/17/FDGIQ9RTLC1.DTL
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Nov, 2004 05:31 pm
Wow Piffka, your menue selection sounds devine,
and I'm sure your family is rewarding you accordingly
with second and third helpings Smile
0 Replies
 
 

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