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as well as I can vs as best (as) I can.

 
 
Reply Thu 16 Feb, 2017 05:17 pm
I was reluctant to include as best I can in a sentence I was writing because I wasnt sure if I should add as after best but then I found that as best (as) I can is altogether wrong but has nonetheless become common in speech, both spoken and written. Apparently it is more proper to say as well (as) I can but I've personally never encountered this, that I can recall, and wonder whether it is something people say or if best I can is the preferred choice, even though the superlative is used.

Thanks for your input.
 
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perennialloner
 
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Reply Thu 16 Feb, 2017 05:44 pm
@dalehileman,
Sorry. I was being lazy. But you didnt answer my question, though I appreciate your response.
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perennialloner
 
  3  
Reply Fri 17 Feb, 2017 02:03 pm
@dalehileman,
But you didn't. And the fact that you can't even be bothered to see how you didn't by rereading my initial post shows that you're only here to entertain yourself.
dalehileman
 
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Reply Fri 17 Feb, 2017 02:07 pm
@perennialloner,
Oh c'mon fella
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dalehileman
 
  -3  
Reply Fri 17 Feb, 2017 03:03 pm
@perennialloner,
Oh Peren

https://able2know.org/topic/369658-1
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vpjeter33
 
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Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2017 10:24 am
Ok...here is WHY it's wrong. "Best" is the superlative form of "good" and "well." This form is used to compare one thing to two or more other things or to the rest of a group. When you say one thing is being or you are doing anything, you need the positive degree of comparison because you are describing or relating only one thing. Therefore, you should say, "I am doing this as well as I can" (using the adverb form) or "This is as good as it can be" (using the adjective form).
ehBeth
 
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Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2017 10:41 am
@perennialloner,
I've never heard "as best as" used in regular conversation. As well as I can is the only formulation I am familiar with. Perhaps as best as is a regional usage?
layman
 
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Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2017 11:08 am
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

I've never heard "as best as" used in regular conversation. As well as I can is the only formulation I am familiar with. Perhaps as best as is a regional usage?


I've often heard "as best as,' and have used it myself. Irsespective of any technical "rules," it is common around these here parts, and everyone knows what you mean when you say it.

It's essentially synonymous with "I'm doing my best," or I'm doing the best I can.'
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layman
 
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Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2017 11:34 am
@ehBeth,
Another regional/dialectical use of "best" is this:

Many people might say: "You'd better roll up your car windows, it's raining."

But many people would also say: "You'd best roll up....."

Is one of these "right," and the other "wrong?"
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dalehileman
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2017 11:36 am
@perennialloner,
Quote:
you can't even be bothered

Oh, but--no offense

Apparently it is [ it's?] more proper to say, ',...as well (as) I can.' But, much as [ ...(as) far as...] I can recall, I've personally never encountered this [expression, ?], and wonder whether [in fact?] it is something [many?] people [often?] say; or [whether?] if '...best I can' is the preferred choice, even though [...in spite of...?] the superlative is used .

However I'm considered a fussbudget if not compulsive. My apolos for not directy answering your q, tho the others apparently doin' okay
perennialloner
 
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Reply Sat 15 Jul, 2017 06:34 am
@dalehileman,
Hi, Dale.

Thanks for the corrections but I'm not really sure what you're correcting?

Did you try to make what I wrote more concise and precise?

I understand why you'd eliminate personally--redundancy, and changed some things for clarity, but why split my sentence and start a second. Is the sentence too long and therefore unclear? I don't think it's a run-on?

Why did you split the two independent clauses in the second sentence with a semi-colon? Was that also for clarity? Or is it "better" not to use commas in such situations?

Is it bad form to mix "whether" and "if" in the same sentence? I'd think because you pretty much started a new sentence with the semicolon, "whether" and "if" awkwardly being together in the same sentence isn't an issue? But maybe "if" is just wrong in that context and "whether" is better?

I'm a fussbudget too so it's okay.
layman
 
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Reply Sun 16 Jul, 2017 12:31 pm
@vpjeter33,
vpjeter33 wrote:

Ok...here is WHY it's wrong. "Best" is the superlative form of "good" and "well." This form is used to compare one thing to two or more other things or to the rest of a group. When you say one thing is being or you are doing anything, you need the positive degree of comparison because you are describing or relating only one thing. Therefore, you should say, "I am doing this as well as I can" (using the adverb form) or "This is as good as it can be" (using the adjective form).


You're right, but that is no reason for turning every decision/action into a false dichotomy between ONLY two possibilities regarding actions, decisions, and/or outcomes. In every situation, there are a virtually infinite number of possible variations, one of which could theoretically be the "best."
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dalehileman
 
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Reply Sun 16 Jul, 2017 03:06 pm
@perennialloner,
Quote:
Hi, Dale.
Quote:

Hi, Pezren

Quote:
what you're correcting?
Nor sure I'm correctin' any7thin'. If I'm ignored the
Quote:
Universe
will probably progress on sked

Quote:
Did you try to make what I wrote more concise and precise?
I've no idea

Quote:
but why split my sentence and start a second.
It's some soprta wierd habit

Quote:
with a semi-colon?
I have thiss strange compulsion to divide things up

Quote:
Is it bad form to mix "whether" and "if" in the same sentence?
God b ut that's a good q

Quote:
I'm a fussbudget too so it's okay.
You and I are on the samw track
0 Replies
 
 

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