6
   

The Ironclads

 
 
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 07:38 am
https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/06/15/powerhouses-the-mighty-ironclad-warships-in-20-gorgeous-images-something-out-of-a-jules-verne-book/

https://www.thevintagenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/EyTKzCu.jpg
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Type: Discussion • Score: 6 • Views: 1,473 • Replies: 40

 
jespah
 
  3  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 07:51 am
@edgarblythe,
That's a gorgeous image. I took the liberty of shrinking it a little so it would fit in the page. Hope you don't mind.
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 08:46 am
Mention of Verne made me think of the Thunder Child, the fictional ironclad torpedo ram of the Royal Navy, destroyed by Martian fighting machines in H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds, while protecting a refugee rescue fleet of civilian vessels.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/82/Correa-Martians_vs._Thunder_Child.jpg
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 08:47 am
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/47/00/d3/4700d3ed0cc9c92b4216cb1a94b92fd8.jpg
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 08:51 am
I suppose their mothers must have loved them. I have to say I like the Royal Navy's World War 1 monitors such as HMS Marshal Ney. Like all monitors, not much ship but lots of gun.

https://i.imgbox.com/JaybFRwY.jpg
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 10:59 am
@jespah,
I think it would benefit us to see the image in both large and small.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 11:06 am
@centrox,
Many of the biggest ass ships in WWII had wooden decks. So It was possible that they were sitting ducks to begin with as Billy Mitchell stqted
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 11:20 am
@farmerman,
I'm sure (by own experiences) that wooden decks are only on warships to keep seamen busy cleaning them.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 11:24 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I was an expert mopper by the time I left that ship.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 11:25 am
@edgarblythe,
Our decks were not wood, but we mopped em all the time.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 11:36 am
@farmerman,
I really liked the photos above. Facscinating. Thanks.

The wooden decks farmer refers to were on the Essex and earlier class U.S. carriers. (I don't know of any others with wooden decks.) This was done because of their naturally high freeboard, and to keep the center of mass (gravity) below the volumetric (bouyancy) center to preserve roll stability.

The Royal Navy took a different approach with Arc Royal and other early carriers, outfitting them with steel flight decks. However this cost them in aircraft numbers and storage capacity for fuel and weapons.

The wooden flight deck carriers of the U.S. and Japanese navies were indeed vulnerable to dive bombing and aerial attack. The aviation gasoline used by the aircraft then didn't help either. Damage control measures were better developed and emphasized in the U.S. Navy than the Japanese, though they got better as the war progressed. I think their loss of three large aircraft carriers to USN dive bombers in ten minutes during the June 1942 Battle of Midway ( they were caught with thrir flight decks full of fuelled armed aircraft getting ready to launch) changed their attitudes.

Modern carriers have deep draft, high freeboards, high strength steel flight decks, lots of ballast & storage for high flash point aviation fuel and weapons and capacious hangar decks - along with compact, very flexible and responsive, high capacity nuclear powerplants.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 12:08 pm
@georgeob1,
Some nice pics in these archives:

Ironclads - the Floating Fortresses of the American Civil War

The first Ironclads 1859-1872

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 12:10 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I think the turret gun, in addition to the iron cladding , made the new navies possible.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 12:20 pm
@georgeob1,
Battleships had teak decks until they roughened the surface of metal decks and(I guess) learned how to deGauss the metal so didnt set off the ammo by static charges.
Sinking metal decked boats wasnt a big deal, it only took a slight change in the armor piercing abilities of ordinance and bombs

georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 12:21 pm
I do recall that our battleships and large cruisers all had teak wood planking covering their armored steel decks, even thrrough the 1960s. As a midshipman on my first cruise in USS Canberra, a Baltimore class 8" gun cruiser, fitted with early surface to air missiles. Every morning we were mustered on the fantail with bare feet and roilled up trousers to "holystone" the wood decks (scraping the sand & saltwater covered decks with limestone).
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 12:34 pm
@georgeob1,
so you apparently didnt learn something from a dam geologist eh?
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 12:41 pm
@farmerman,
I learn something from them every day. They certainly are an overbearing lot !

I spend a lot of time in our San Francisco office: the ratios of Engineers (good guys) to Geologists and Scientists (chemists, biologists, toxicologists, etc.) are 3:2:1. The bioloigists are all cheerful & upbeat, the chemists a bit dour and the geologists are .... well, .. geologists.

Actually I find geology fascinating, involving complex issues and new ways of thinking. However I will never admit that again.
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 12:45 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
deGauss the metal so didnt set off the ammo by static charges.

Er... that was so that the ships didn't set off floating mines sensitive to the change in the Earth's magnetic field caused by an untreated ship's hull.


farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 12:47 pm
@centrox,
yeh that ws the primary reaso but static on board is a problem. I often had it in my engine room of my boat.Wed wear static lines when workingnear the e ans fuel lines (ven though it was diesel)
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 01:43 pm
http://www.klaus-kramer.de/Schiff/Panzerschiffe/Panzerschiffe_1/L871a144k.jpg
From one of Walter's links
0 Replies
 
 

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