169
   

monitoring Trump and relevant contemporary events

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 01:42 pm
@coldjoint,
coldjoint wrote:
You check whatever source you want.
But why didn't you do it but post this nonsense?
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 01:44 pm
@coldjoint,
It looks like the loonies have picked up on this piece of old news, just as they did with the anti-malarial drug, in some weird need to convince us that the virus is not dangerous. Interestingly, two days later BoJo shut down the UK. Contrast the UK position with that of the World Health Organization:

Quote:

UK: COVID19 is NOT a high impact infectious disease, and is similar to a bad flu pandemic, however if many cases occur in a short time they can overwhelm our health care

WHO: COVID19 is a serious disease and can rapidly overwhelm even the most advanced health care systems


UK: COVID19 can’t be stopped but it can be delayed through physical distancing

WHO: COVID19 can be stopped. Singapore, South Korea and China have shown we can do this. Physical distancing has its part but is a defensive measure. The core of our policy has to be case finding, quarantine, contact tracing and isolation of contacts. See WHO COVID 19 23rd March: We must attack the virus not just defend against it - you can't win a football game only by defending It is no longer a question of whether we can, but if we will.


UK: suspected cases of COVID19 should only be tested if the patient’s condition is serious enough to require an overnight stay in a hospital. Health workers however should be tested even for mild COVID19 (this is a new policy added after a week of no testing of health care workers).

WHO: every suspected case of COVID19 should be tested - if we don’t do that it is like trying to fight a fire blindfold. If there is a shortage of tests then the most vulnerable patients should be prioritized until more tests are available


UK: doctors and nurses treating patients with COVID19 don’t need full length surgical gowns unless the patients are under intensive care. Instead they should wear aprons. Whether they need to wear eye protection depends on assessment of the situation.

WHO: doctors and nurses should always wear full length gowns, adequate eye protection, masks and gloves. If there is a shortage of personal protection equipment then doctors and nurses can wear aprons without eye protection but should return to the full personal protection equipment as soon as it becomes available again


UK: the virus that causes COVID-19 is airborne (spread through the tiny droplets you exhale while breathing) and can infect random members of the community. A third of all the transmission happens like this

WHO: the virus that causes COVID-19 is NOT airborne and is only spread through direct contact with the larger droplets in coughs and sneezes, and through touching surfaces that those droplets land on


UK: a third of the transmission happens in the community, a third in work places and schools, a third in the household

WHO: most of the transmission in China (perhaps 75 to 85%) happened in households. Most of the rest is through other forms of close or prolonged contact. Community spread, if it occurs, is rare. Most supposed “community spread” is through untraced transmission chains with close or prolonged contact.


UK: a third of the transmission is through asymptomatic cases, where the symptoms are so mild they never knew that they had any disease

WHO: nearly all cases of COVID-19 will show some noticeable symptoms at some point in the course of the disease, although they can infect others during asymptomatic phases of the illness


UK: the infectious period for COVID-19 starts from 12 hours before you show symptoms and continues to 7 days after you first show symptoms

WHO: the infectious period for COVID-19 starts from 2 days before you show symptoms and continues throughout the illness and then for another two weeks after you feel completely better.


UK: If you are infected with suspected COVID-19 then everyone else in your household will get it anyway, so the most important thing is to avoid spreading it to other households.

WHO: If you get COVID-19 then from data from China, there is only between 3 and 10 chances in 100 that you infect someone else in your household. The top priority is to make sure you don’t infect other members of your household. You should wear a surgical mask. Only one person should be assigned to care you, preferrably young, with no underlying health conditions. This person should also wear a surgical mask. You should stay in a separate part of the house as far as possible, stay in your bedroom and have a separate bathroom. Your carer should wash their hands thoroughly every time after caring for you.


UK: The quarantine period for COVID-19 is 7 days from symptoms onset. If you live with others, then quarantine the entire household for 14 days. If anyone else gets it during that period they should self isolate for 7 days but the others can be regarded as no longer infectious and can leave

WHO: Quarantine for COVID-19 continues until the patient is symptom free and then for an ADDITIONAL two weeks or until they have two tests that come out negative 24 hours apart.

A suspected case of COVID-19 needs to be isolated immediately, without waiting for test results. All contacts of a COVID-19 case must self isolate for 14 days (the incubation period for COVID-19) and if they develop COVID-19 symptoms the contacts must be tested too.

science20
coldjoint
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 01:46 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
Walter has handled the light work

Walter handled nothing.
Quote:
You really need to learn not to shoot your mouth off when you don't know what the hell you're talking about.

Heal thyself.
0 Replies
 
coldjoint
 
  0  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 01:48 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
But why didn't you do it but post this nonsense?

I don't consider it nonsense. I also do not care that you do.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 01:50 pm
@hightor,
The "Rapid risk assessment" by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

Quote:
25 Mar 2020
Rapid risk assessment: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic: increased transmission in the EU/EEA and the UK – seventh update
Summary
[...]
In the present situation where COVID-19 is rapidly spreading in Europe, the current assessment is:

• The risk of severe disease associated with COVID-19 for people in the EU/EEA and the UK is currently considered moderate for the general population and very high for older adults and individuals with chronic underlying conditions.
• The risk of occurrence of widespread national community transmission of COVID-19 in the EU/EEA and the UK in the coming weeks is moderate if effective mitigation measures are in place and very high if insufficient mitigation measures are in place.
• The risk of healthcare system capacity being exceeded in the EU/EEA and the UK in the coming weeks is considered high.
0 Replies
 
livinglava
 
  0  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 01:57 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

livinglava wrote:

What about all the deaths reported in the media?

What about those then? Fake news?
How is that related to the HCID criteria by Public Health England?

It sounds like the severity of the epidemic is being downplayed.

I guess I just can't understand how there can be so many deaths in the news and then I read that it doesn't meet the criteria for being "high consequence."

Is the implication that all the global deaths reported in the media were/are fake news?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 02:00 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Walter has handled the light work, he needs no help from me. You really need to learn not to shoot your mouth off when you don't know what the hell you're talking about.
While I'm sure that he doesn't know what he talking about, I don't think that my English is good enough to respond to his Trump-style posts. (Even native English speakers like Dr. Deborah Birx, Surgeon General Jerome Adams, and even Vice President Mike Pence have difficulties doing such.)
livinglava
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 02:08 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Setanta wrote:
Walter has handled the light work, he needs no help from me. You really need to learn not to shoot your mouth off when you don't know what the hell you're talking about.
While I'm sure that he doesn't know what he talking about, I don't think that my English is good enough to respond to his Trump-style posts. (Even native English speakers like Dr. Deborah Birx, Surgeon General Jerome Adams, and even Vice President Mike Pence have difficulties doing such.)

It sounds like you're confusing language abilities with other aspects of reasoning and communication. One does not translate into the other, you know.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 02:16 pm
izzythepush wrote:
things aren't being downgraded over here. It's getting more restrictive, I can only go out for essential groceries and medicine. That's it.
I do know that. But coldjoint can't understand it. Of course not.
coldjoint
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 02:18 pm
Quote:
How deadly is the coronavirus? It’s still far from clear

Read the whole article.
Quote:
If we take drastic measures to reduce the incidence of Covid-19, it follows that the deaths will also go down. We risk being convinced that we have averted something that was never really going to be as severe as we feared. This unusual way of reporting Covid-19 deaths explains the clear finding that most of its victims have underlying conditions — and would normally be susceptible to other seasonal viruses, which are virtually never recorded as a specific cause of death.

Makes sense. And suggests an over reaction IMO.
Quote:
The simplest way to judge whether we have an exceptionally lethal disease is to look at the death rates. Are more people dying than we would expect to die anyway in a given week or month? Statistically, we would expect about 51,000 to die in Britain this month. At the time of writing, 422 deaths are linked to Covid-19 — so 0.8 per cent of that expected total. On a global basis, we’d expect 14 million to die over the first three months of the year. The world’s 18,944 coronavirus deaths represent 0.14 per cent of that total. These figures might shoot up but they are, right now, lower than other infectious diseases that we live with (such as flu). Not figures that would, in and of themselves, cause drastic global reactions.

https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/The-evidence-on-Covid-19-is-not-as-clear-as-we-think
Brand X
 
  3  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 02:23 pm
Michael Tracey
@mtracey
·
24m
Is
@NikkiHaley
also going to direct this query to Boeing, on whose board she sat until last week, and whose lobbyists just secured a $17B bailout despite years of corporate mismanagement? BTW
@Boeing
was even nice enough to sponsor Nikki’s inauguration as governor of SC in 2011
Quote Tweet

Nikki Haley
@NikkiHaley
· 1h
These are the items included in the stimulus bill:
$75 mill for public television/radio
$25 mil for the Kennedy Center
$75 mil for the Natl Endowment for the Arts
$75 mill for the Natl Endowment for the Humanities

How many more people could have been helped with this money?
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 02:26 pm
@Brand X,
Quote:
How many more people could have been helped with this money?

Would you like to answer her?
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 02:43 pm
@coldjoint,
Haley wrote:
How many more people could have been helped with this money?


Very few, actually. It represents 1/8000 of the total amount of the stimulus bill, and even a smaller fraction if you add the earlier relief package — and, in all probability, there will be more big spending bills before this pandemic has ended.
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 03:07 pm
@hightor,

Quote:
Very few, actually.

A little hypocritical out. Every person matters, especially if you can blame what bad happens to them on Trump.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 03:12 pm
@hightor,
Well I'll agree that in comparison with the cost of Mike Bloomberg's $800+ million campaign is peanuts. However one must wonder just why the Democrats were willing, in the midst of this fast-moving epidemic to hold up the process to insert that and similar payoffs to internal and associated interest groups in the effort.

You appear to be trying a bit too hard to find an excuse for them.
livinglava
 
  0  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 03:25 pm
@coldjoint,
coldjoint wrote:

Quote:
The simplest way to judge whether we have an exceptionally lethal disease is to look at the death rates. Are more people dying than we would expect to die anyway in a given week or month? Statistically, we would expect about 51,000 to die in Britain this month. At the time of writing, 422 deaths are linked to Covid-19 — so 0.8 per cent of that expected total. On a global basis, we’d expect 14 million to die over the first three months of the year. The world’s 18,944 coronavirus deaths represent 0.14 per cent of that total. These figures might shoot up but they are, right now, lower than other infectious diseases that we live with (such as flu). Not figures that would, in and of themselves, cause drastic global reactions.

https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/The-evidence-on-Covid-19-is-not-as-clear-as-we-think

What this seems to imply is that the virus itself isn't a hoax, but that the coverage of it is being spun in a way designed to stir up a much bigger response than is warranted.

If that's the case, you're implying a media conspiracy, aren't you? i.e. one where someone decided to identify a relatively irrelevant disease that would be the trigger for many vulnerable peoples' deaths without ever even being noticed, in order to drum up hysteria surrounding it?

Assuming that's not the case, then there must be some reason this virus/disease is different for it to have gained so much attention?

So which is it? Is it a normal disease that has been exploited to generate a media/political/economic frenzy? Or is it special enough to warrant all the attention, quarantining, social-distancing, and other special precautions that it's gotten?
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  4  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 04:06 pm
@georgeob1,
Quote:
However one must wonder just why the Democrats were willing, in the midst of this fast-moving epidemic to hold up the process...

Do you have evidence that this expenditure actually "held up" the process? Someone else was complaining about a firearms bill that, in actuality, wasn't even under consideration.

Quote:
You appear to be trying a bit too hard to find an excuse for them.

It wasn't really that hard.
0 Replies
 
Brand X
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 04:58 pm
@hightor,
Obama should go on TV and raise the awareness of this, or someone else with that kind of megaphone appeal.
0 Replies
 
Below viewing threshold (view)
blatham
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2020 06:47 pm
I see that as of today, the US has the most reported covid cases in the world. So clearly the right time to militarize the northern border to ensure no Canadians sneak in and mingle which is, I'm sure, Trump's rationale.
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.25 seconds on 04/02/2020 at 07:42:19