193
   

monitoring Trump and relevant contemporary events

 
 
layman
 
  -2  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 02:19 pm
@wmwcjr,
wmwcjr wrote:

Here's a link to the article entitled "How American Politics Went Insane":

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/07/how-american-politics-went-insane/485570/

It's quite a long article. I've only had time to skim through it. It looks interesting. At least that's my opinion.


I agree, Bill, it is interesting. And, like you, I have only skimmed it. Based on that (which may well be mistaken), I take the author to be arguing that political reform was miguided and that career politicians, with all their corruption, lobbyists, pork barrel legislation, etc. is NECESSARY for "stablilty."
layman
 
  -2  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 02:23 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Quote:
Can you provide a link to this article layman?


Sorry, I thought I had done that. It was Wapo:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/muslims-targeted-by-violence-in-wake-of-is-claimed-attacks/2017/06/19/ecc866f4-5524-11e7-840b-512026319da7_story.html

As you would suspect from them, their very first account of incidents constituing a WAVE OF VIOLENCE was this:

Quote:
This month alone, a Muslim woman wearing a head scarf told police in Lancashire her car was struck by a bag of vomit. Worshippers at the Omar Faruque mosque in Cambridge found strips of ham attached to their vehicles. Several Muslim families have reported receiving letters warning, “You are no longer welcome in this country.” Scores say they have been spat on.


You attacked my car! VIOLENT, I tellzya!!
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -3  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 02:32 pm
@hightor,
hightor wrote:


But Fuller's piece is not "corrosive" or "hateful".


We obviously disagree.

There is no way in hell that Fuller didn't know the sort of reaction his piece would generate among those on the right and that reaction rather than an interesting little thought experiment was his intent. That falls within the general heading of "corrosive and hateful". I don't buy for a minute the notion that the article was a clever and subtle parody of the right's reaction to politicians with whom they disagree. I also don't think he's clever enough to have left clues for it being a parody, so he could make that claim at a later date, but even that's more likely than it having always been intended as a parody of the right.

Quote:
As I said, he's hardly a mainstream writer who shapes popular opinion.


So what? That the intended effect wasn't more widespread because neither he nor the Huffington Post are anything close to being household names doesn't alter the intent or the nature of what he wrote. I certainly wasn't arguing that the guy should be thrown in prison or prohibited from ever posting on-line again, and neither was layman.

The corrosive and hateful rhetoric that is deepening the divide in this country doesn't have to incite violence to be deserving of condemnation. This was part of what Bruni had to say. His article wasn't limited to rhetoric he felt would lead to violence and all of the examples he used weren't obviously bigger deals than Fuller's article. You seem to think that you are somehow the arbiter of what corrosive rhetoric is a big enough deal to care about and so you dismissed layman's comments because he happened to think Fuller's article in some way was, and you obviously don't. I guess you must have agreed with all of Bruni's examples and/or considered all of those folks mainstream shapers of opinion because you didn't react derisively to his article in the way you did layman's comments or dismissively as you did mine. Don't get me wrong, I'm not offended or hurt by your derision or dismissal, I'm just pointing out your inconsistency.

Finn dAbuzz
 
  -1  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 02:33 pm
@maporsche,
Oops - missed that detail
0 Replies
 
mesquite
 
  2  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 02:36 pm
@Olivier5,
Olivier5 wrote:

I wish I could get a copy. Also for the Jesus' wife story... :-)

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/07/how-american-politics-went-insane/485570/

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/07/the-unbelievable-tale-of-jesus-wife/485573/
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 02:50 pm
@wmwcjr,
I've been reading The Atlantic online, sans any problems.. so far.
0 Replies
 
revelette1
 
  2  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 02:58 pm
Quote:
Health Subsidy Cuts Could Hurt the Middle Class the Most

ASHEVILLE, N.C. — Jane and Abe Goren retired here five years ago to escape the higher cost of living they had abided for decades in the suburbs of New York City. They did not anticipate having to write monthly checks for health insurance that would exceed their mortgage and property taxes combined.

Ms. Goren, 62, is paying nearly $1,200 a month for coverage through the individual insurance market (her husband, 69, is on Medicare) and accumulating enough debt that her sons recently held a fund-raiser to help. For next year, her insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, has proposed raising premiums by an average of 22.9 percent, a spike it is blaming squarely on President Trump.

For months, the Trump administration has refused to say whether the federal government will keep paying billions of dollars in subsidies that lower out-of-pocket health insurance costs for nearly six million low-income customers under the Affordable Care Act. Mr. Trump’s hedging has created deep uncertainty in the individual insurance market, the impact of which may become clearer on Wednesday, the deadline for insurers to say whether they plan to sell next year on the federal marketplace created under the health law and to file rate requests.

North Carolina has more than 300,000 people benefiting from these “cost-sharing” subsidies, which reimburse insurers for absorbing the deductibles and co-payments of low-income customers. The Affordable Care Act requires that these customers’ out-of-pocket costs be lowered one way or another. If the federal government stops reimbursing insurers, many insurers have said they will make up for it by raising premiums.

Paradoxically, that will primarily hurt not poor customers but millions of middle-class people like the Gorens, who earn too much to qualify for premium assistance under the law and will bear the full brunt of any rate increase.

Across the nation, individual market customers like them are seeing signs of big premium increases, which insurers are largely attributing to the possibility of losing the federal cost-sharing subsidies and of Mr. Trump’s not enforcing the health law’s mandate that most people have coverage or pay a penalty. Mr. Trump has repeatedly pointed to such increases as signs that the markets are in “a death spiral” and to bolster support as the Republican Senate leadership rushes to vote on a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act next week.

Maryland’s largest insurer, CareFirst, has asked to raise rates by an average of 52 percent, for example, while Virginia’s largest insurer, Anthem, has proposed an average rate increase of 34 percent.

Pennsylvania’s insurance commissioner said rates would rise by 8.8 percent next year if the cost payments continue; if Mr. Trump ends them, rates will soar by 36.3 percent. While some insurers and state regulators have discussed limiting the sharpest increases to plans for people who receive premium subsidies — allowing unsubsidized customers to get lower rates outside the marketplaces — it remains to be seen how widespread such actions would be.

Some insurers are pulling out of the marketplaces completely: Several dozen counties in Ohio, Missouri and Washington State have no insurers signed up for next year.

In North Carolina, Blue Cross and Blue Shield said it would have sought an 8.8 percent average increase, instead of 22.9 percent, if not for the uncertainty.


NYT
0 Replies
 
wmwcjr
 
  -1  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 03:10 pm
@layman,
That's exactly what I thought. My understanding is that The Atlantic is liberal. The author of this article seems to be questioning certain reforms of the political establishment that liberals (and others as well) had championed in previous times. I've always been interested whenever a liberal or conservative writer or spokesman has changed his mind about a position of his political camp. Political instability is not desirable. Such instability (at least in part) allowed Lenin and Hitler to come to power. (This is just my opinion.)
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -2  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 03:12 pm
@layman,
Quote:
Several Muslim families have reported receiving letters warning, “You are no longer welcome in this country.”


"Several?" What's that mean? Three?

Why not "letters informing" them rather than the loaded and ominous-sounding word "warning?"

They're being informed that they're not "welcome." In light of that notice that "the party is over," you'd think they might be willing to voluntarily leave the house of their guests.


Olivier5
 
  3  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 03:55 pm
@mesquite,
Thank you. The Jesus wife papyrus forgery story is nothing short of amazing.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -3  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 03:58 pm
@layman,
For cheese-eaters like Wapo, any expression of disagreement (which itself a horrendous INSULT) or disapproval is a WAVE OF VIOLENCE, eh?

Well, I mean if, and ONLY if, that disapproval is of positions or groups they hold dear.

As I've said before, I am, and always will be, "islamophobic." I don't ratify and approve of Islam. Why? Because I think it's all a crock of ****, that's why.

Sue me, cheese-eaters.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  -4  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 04:14 pm
@layman,
One of the interns on Infowars recently noted that there is a misuse of language involved in talking about Islamic terrorism in Western countries. We should be talking about Islamic hate crimes; the terrorists in the picture are the governments which are importing these barbarians into Western nations in wholesale quantities...

But, one way or another, the hand which was offered in friendship to Islamic migrants in Europe, has been bitten off...
layman
 
  -4  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 04:21 pm
@gungasnake,
Quote:
But, one way or another, the hand which was offered in friendship to Islamic migrants in Europe, has been bitten off.

Yeah, Gunga. If it wasn't so long a phrase, I might just starting referring to muslims as "the thing that wouldn't leave." They've overstayed their welcome, sho nuff.
Mark Twain wrote:
“If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a muslim.”
Below viewing threshold (view)
snood
 
  6  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 05:12 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:

Quote:
But, one way or another, the hand which was offered in friendship to Islamic migrants in Europe, has been bitten off.

Yeah, Gunga. If it wasn't so long a phrase, I might just starting referring to muslims as "the thing that wouldn't leave." They've overstayed their welcome, sho nuff.
Mark Twain wrote:
If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a muslim.



Mark Twain never said or wrote that about a muslim. The quote doesn't mention muslims in any way. It isn't "paraphrasing" when you put it in a quote box and lead with "Mark Twain wrote". It's just lying. Can't you stop lying, and just babble your own Islamaphobic blather without making up some lying quotes?
glitterbag
 
  5  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 05:28 pm
@snood,
He might not know he's lying, he may just be relying on someone else to do the hard lifting. You know, looking up quotes, verifying facts, the sort of stuff that actual smart people do.
layman
 
  -1  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 05:47 pm
@glitterbag,
Mark Twain wrote:
“Rags, wretchedness, poverty and dirt, those signs and symbols that indicate the presence of Moslem rule more surely than the crescent-flag itself."
layman
 
  0  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 05:57 pm
@layman,
Speaking of the last muslim caliphate, the Ottoman Empire with it's capitol in Turkey, Twain said:

Quote:
When Russia is ready to war with them again, I hope England and France will not find it good breeding or good judgment to interfere. …And how they will pay for it when Russia turns her guns upon them again! It is soothing to the heart to abuse England and France for interposing to save the Ottoman Empire from the destruction it has so richly deserved for a thousand years' …”


Twain was what ya might call an extreme "Islamophobe," get it?

He wanted to destroy ISIS before it was even ISIS, ya know? A true man of vision.

Go research that ****, eh, Snoody?
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -3  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 06:12 pm
@layman,
These muslims didn't start with the terrorism yesterday, eh? Talking about then-current events in Syria and Lebanon, Twain said:

Mark Twain wrote:
Five thousand Christians were massacred in Damascus in 1861 by the Turks. They say those narrow streets ran blood for several days, and that men, women and children were butchered indiscriminately and left to rot by hundreds all through the Christian quarter; they say, further, that the stench was dreadful. All the Christians who could get away fled from the city, and the Mohammedans would not defile their hands by burying the ‘infidel dogs.’ The thirst for blood extended to the high lands of Hermon and Anti-Lebanon, and in a short time twenty-five thousand more Christians were massacred and their possessions laid waste.
layman
 
  -2  
Tue 20 Jun, 2017 06:42 pm
@layman,
Mark Twain wrote:
I have never disliked a Chinaman as I do these degraded Turks and Arabs. A Syrian village is the sorriest sight in the world, and its surroundings are eminently in keeping with it... Lepers, cripples, the blind, and the idiotic, assail you on every hand, and they know but one word of but one language apparently - the eternal “bucksheesh.” [begging for handouts]... they were infested with vermin, and the dirt had caked on them till it amounted to bark. The plows these people use are simply a sharpened stick, such as Abraham plowed with...They never invent anything, never learn anything.


As one commentator put it:

Quote:
Mark Twain’s evaluation of the backwardness of Muslim lands would be too candid for many sensitive ears today. The onus of political correctness nowadays stifles honest observation and truthful judgment regarding low-classed people. It is now the custom to deny inferiority by using euphemistic, white-washed language that speaks of depraved savages as being merely deprived.
 

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