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Why I Don't Talk About Race With White People

 
 
wmwcjr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2016 09:10 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
I did notice that he copied and pasted an article from the Heritage Foundation, which is a right-wing outfit. I'm still not a conservative, but I'll admit that I'm conservative about a few major issues (although I and my Republican wife consider Trump to be a fascist). I learned a long time ago that neither side has an absolute monopoly on morality or truth. As the trite saying goes, even a broken clock is right twice a day. The late and great Senator Hubert Humphrey once said the family unit is the foundation of society and that when the family goes, the nation goes with it. Besides, I think the late Senator Patrick Daniel Moynahan, another liberal, would agree with the Heritage Foundation regarding the negative impact of certain welfare policies upon the family.
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2016 11:45 pm
@wmwcjr,
It's been clear to me for some time that this site is not about fairness or the open exchange of ideas with intelligent adult discourse. It most certainly is a clique of childish, not childlike denoting innocence, but childish, sophomoric, immature milksops

Thankfully there are posters such as yourself to counter their Ultra left-liberal blather.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2016 06:31 pm

How the Legacy of Slavery Is Very Much Still with U.S.

Ava DuVernay's new film "13th" takes audiences on a trajectory from the 13th Amendment to mass incarceration.
By Amy Goodman / Democracy Now!
October 3, 2016

http://www.alternet.org/documentaries/how-legacy-slavery-very-much-still-us

As Ava DuVernay’s new documentary "13th" opens at the New York Film Festival, we speak to two people featured in the film: Malkia Cyril of the Center for Media Justice and Kevin Gannon of Grand View University.

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: On Saturday, just before I sat down with Ava DuVernay, I sat down with two of the people featured in the film. Among those who are in the film, Michelle Alexander, Angela Davis—Common writes the music—but Malkia Cyril of the Center for Media Justice and Kevin Gannon of Grand View University in Iowa. I started by asking Malkia what she wanted the film to convey.

MALKIA CYRIL: My biggest hope is that people understand two things. One, that slavery has already been amended once; let’s not do it again. As we get all this technology pouring into the hands of police officers—electronic monitoring, aerial surveillance over Baltimore—it’s critical that we don’t repeat the mistakes of the past and turn our communities into open-air prisons, even as we decarcerate the facilities themselves. So that’s the biggest thing that I hope people walk away with. And, two, I want people to walk away with the knowledge that, you know, this country was built on the bones, the work, the labor, the lives of black bodies. It continues to profit from that exploited labor. And we continue to profit from this system, that we call white supremacy, that we don’t want to accept or acknowledge. And that system is going to come to—excuse me, that system is going to come to an end.

AMY GOODMAN: Professor Gannon, this trajectory from the 13th Amendment to mass incarceration, take us on that journey.

KEVIN GANNON: Well, as the film talks about, the—you know, we like to look at the 13 Amendment as something that ended slavery. You know, the Civil War ended slavery. That’s our mythology. But, of course, it doesn’t. You know, slavery persists. And slavery is a state of profound unfreedom, of not being an autonomous individual, of being owned and subjugated under another. So, the clause in the 13th Amendment that says, you know, except in the cases of criminal, you know, incarceration, that’s the lever.

AMY GOODMAN: Explain that.

KEVIN GANNON: Well, it’s—the 13th Amendment says neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall be permitted, so it becomes unconstitutional, but there is that dependent clause in there: except in the cases of having committed a crime. And so, here is this lever now to basically carry forward slavery under a different guise. You know, slaves have prison uniforms now. And so the convict labor gangs of the late 19th century and the early 20th century, that’s not a coincidental, that’s not a novel invention. If you look at immediately after the Civil War, the ex-Confederate states passed laws called Black Codes that basically criminalize an entire range of behavior. You could be in prison for a year if you were arrested for vagrancy, and "vagrancy" was defined so broadly—I mean, things like walking down the street and looking impudently at somebody, not being able to produce your labor contract for the plantation that you were working for. You know, so this was mass criminalization of blackness. It was an attempt to retain as much of slavery as possible without the name of slavery.

AMY GOODMAN: And then take it forward to now.

KEVIN GANNON: Well, it’s—I mean, that’s the structure that’s built. You know, it continues upon the structures of inequality built before the Civil War. It maintains the racial caste system that the United States was built on, as Malkia said, and continues to profit from. And as long as African Americans and people of color are seen as the other, as dehumanized, as outside of civil society, that’s where we get to today. And it’s just different iterations built upon that same structural outlook.

Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,200 stations in North America. She is the co-author of The Silenced Majority, a New York Times best-seller.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2016 06:32 pm

Financial Group Forced to Issue Apology After Giuliani Delivers Racist Comments at Dinner
CEO of the Commercial Finance Association apologized.
By Tom Boggioni / Raw Story
October 1, 2016

Print
55 COMMENTS

Photo Credit: Rudy Giuliani speaks to Fox News (screen grab)

A financial services trade group issued a formal apology to its members this week after former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani made off-the-cuff racist comments during a speech to the group.

According to the New York Observer — a paper published by Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner — Giuliani made comments about the kitchen staff working the dinner at New York’s Waldorf Astoria Hotel where the dinner was held.

Calling the Trump adviser’s remarks, “unscripted,” the CEO of the Commercial Finance Association apologized.

“At CFA’s 40 Under 40 Awards last Thursday night, keynote speaker Rudolph Giuliani veered sharply off course from the leadership message he agreed to deliver and presented unscripted personal opinions which were independent of CFA’s political position or core values,” CEO Bob Trojan wrote. “For those of you who were offended by Mr. Giuliani’s remarks, please accept my sincere apology.”

According to an attendee, Giuliani’s comments were met with silence.
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“Rudy talked about immigration and made a really, really inappropriate comment about the quote-unquote Mexicans in the kitchen at the Waldorf,” the attendee said. “It was bad. You could hear a pin drop. I think he was looking for applause.”

The apology came one day after the International Council of Shopping Centers axed Giuliani as their keynote speaker at their annual conference after members complained about his rhetoric while on the campaign trail for GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.
0 Replies
 
momoends
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2016 09:11 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
I´m sorry... you´re right
0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2016 10:29 pm
Chris Hayes Blasts Bill O'Reilly's Super-Racial Rants

0 Replies
 
BertieBottsBeans
 
  3  
Reply Mon 1 May, 2017 12:59 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
I, as someone not living in America am seeing and reading these facts about the status quo in the US only since a couple days back. I have to say, that I think it's horrifying what's happening. It IS blatant racism, and even I can see it from across the Atlantic with only sparse news feeds on the topic. I would only like to say to you: I hope you win your fight, be it on a personal scale, or larger. I will also try to look out for signs here, and be less of a 'white person' about it, so that I notice when these things are apparent, just not to me. If, because of my hurt feelings someone has to keep their mouth shut, I don't think I would be glad to have been spared the pain. So, I will look out for discrimination and do my part. Thank you for explaining what I wouldn't be able to understand without posts like this one.
maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Mon 1 May, 2017 01:30 pm
@BertieBottsBeans,
Quote:
I, as someone not living in America am seeing and reading these facts about the status quo in the US only since a couple days back. I have to say, that I think it's horrifying what's happening. It IS blatant racism, and even I can see it from across the Atlantic with only sparse news feeds on the topic.


What are you doing about the racism in your own country? It is up to Americans to deal with racism in America.

I get very upset when people from Spain, and the Netherlands and other European countries jump on attacking America when the racism in these countries is at least as bad. There is no question that there is still racism in American culture. We have at least taken the step of starting a national dialog on these issues. This is not good enough, but it is better than many Western European countries have done.
0 Replies
 
tibbleinparadise
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 May, 2017 01:34 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
I don't get why we can't all just be people. I mean, we're all different from each other anyways, what does one more thing (skin color, gender, sexual orientation, etc) change? Who cares "where somebody came from", did they stop being a person when they moved? What difference does culture make at a very basic level.

I use two ideals when dealing with people:

"Love they neighbor" and "Do until others..."

When I get old and think back I want to know that I always tried to take the high road and did the right thing.



oralloy
 
  -4  
Reply Mon 1 May, 2017 01:41 pm
@BertieBottsBeans,
BertieBottsBeans wrote:
It IS blatant racism, and even I can see it from across the Atlantic with only sparse news feeds on the topic.

Nonsense. All these BLM goons want is to be able to murder cops and white people with impunity.
0 Replies
 
wmwcjr
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 May, 2017 09:35 pm
@tibbleinparadise,
tibbleinparadise wrote:
I don't get why we can't all just be people. I mean, we're all different from each other anyways, what does one more thing (skin color, gender, sexual orientation, etc) change? Who cares "where somebody came from", did they stop being a person when they moved? What difference does culture make at a very basic level.

I use two ideals when dealing with people:

"Love they neighbor" and "Do until others..."

When I get old and think back I want to know that I always tried to take the high road and did the right thing.


Amen!
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2017 01:30 am
Quote:
The US Department of Justice has reportedly decided not to charge two white officers who shot and killed a black man in Louisiana last summer.

Video footage appearing to show the officers holding down Alton Sterling as they fired their weapons sparked days of protests in Baton Rouge.

News of the decision leaked to US media on Tuesday before the city mayor or the Sterling family had been told.

People soon began gathering outside the shop where the incident happened.

A vigil was organised for Tuesday night, with small crowds gathering near the city's police headquarters.

The civil rights investigation was opened soon after the 37-year-old was killed outside the grocery shop he was selling CDs.

At the time, a series of fatal police shootings involving African-Americans had sparked a debate about police use of force.

The federal decision not to prosecute the two officers comes with a new US government and a new head of the Justice Department, Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

It does not mean the state of Louisiana could not bring its own charges.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-39788679
oralloy
 
  -4  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2017 08:29 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
The US Department of Justice has reportedly decided not to charge two white officers who shot and killed a black man in Louisiana last summer.

Well done.

We still need to help that poor policewoman in Oklahoma who is being lynched for defending herself against one of these BLM goons.
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  -4  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2017 07:13 pm
For your edification Bobsal is dead...I killed him...he no longer haunts A2K as of 11/9/16.

And good riddance!!
oralloy
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2017 07:57 pm
@giujohn,
Quote:
Tulsa police union files ethics complaint against DA Steve Kunzweiler alleging 'rushed' decision in Betty Shelby case

http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/local/watch-live-tulsa-police-union-filing-ethics-complaint-against-da/article_6de0df3b-bc9d-54bc-b91e-5158d0d24726.html
oralloy
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2017 08:13 pm
@revelette2,
revelette2 wrote:
The following is what the movement is all about, it is not about killing cops or just being obnoxious, but is about tying to change certain types of cops thinking they have to the right to murder because they wear a badge.

Video shows Tulsa man had hands up before police shooting

Quote:
TULSA, Okla. — An unarmed black man killed by a white Oklahoma officer who was responding to a stalled vehicle can be seen in police video walking away from officers and toward his SUV with his hands up before he approaches the driver's side door, where he drops to the ground after being shocked with a stun gun then fatally shot.

In Tulsa police helicopter footage that was among several clips released Monday showing the shooting of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher and its aftermath, a man in the helicopter that arrives above the scene as Crutcher walks to the vehicle can be heard saying "time for a Taser." He then says: "That looks like a bad dude, too. Probably on something."

Police Chief Chuck Jordan announced before the video and audio recordings' release that Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV when he was shot Friday. It's not clear from the footage what led Betty Shelby, the officer who fired the fatal shot, to draw her gun or what orders officers might have given Crutcher. Local and federal investigations are underway to determine whether criminal charges are warranted in the shooting or if Crutcher's civil rights were violated.

No, BLM is about thugs who want to murder cops and white people with impunity.

Your example is a case of a police officer lawfully defending herself.


revelette2 wrote:
I already know the replies and how this is going to go down. It is so depressing but it must be devastating to be a black man in the US right now.

Well, devastating for the ones who wish that they could murder cops and white people with impunity.
oralloy
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2017 08:15 pm
@maporsche,
maporsche wrote:
How you can fail to see, time and time again, how this likely would have ended differently if he were a white man is beyond my ability to understand.

As I recall, police also tend to react when white people make a sudden grab for an unknown object.
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 8 May, 2017 07:24 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:

Quote:
Tulsa police union files ethics complaint against DA Steve Kunzweiler alleging 'rushed' decision in Betty Shelby case

http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/local/watch-live-tulsa-police-union-filing-ethics-complaint-against-da/article_6de0df3b-bc9d-54bc-b91e-5158d0d24726.html



The manslaughter charge is bullshit and a knee jerk reaction to the political climate. This is a case for a civil action not a criminal one. I would assign the subject 80% fault and the cop 20% and award $$ accordingly.
0 Replies
 
Delores Paulk
 
  5  
Reply Fri 12 May, 2017 07:29 pm
@oralloy,
It has been devastating to be a black man in this country ever since the captors brought them here.

I do not believe the BLM people are thugs who want to kill cops and white people. The killing of unarmed black folks has been happening for years, long before cell phones caught it on video and made everyone aware of it.

Pain and anger have been accumulating for so many years, a resistance had to happen. Of course the movement is not perfect, but when you feel as though your back is against the wall, you do what you feel you must to protect yourself.

I think it's odd that we white people feel free to criticize black people's response to what they perceive to be injustice.
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 12 May, 2017 08:21 pm
@Delores Paulk,
Delores Paulk wrote:
I do not believe the BLM people are thugs who want to kill cops and white people.

How come they always scream bloody murder whenever a police officer or white person guns down a black person who is trying to murder them?


Delores Paulk wrote:
I think it's odd that we white people feel free to criticize black people's response to what they perceive to be injustice.

I believe white people still retain Free Speech rights in America, although I'd not be surprised if the Left tried to repeal this right for white people.
0 Replies
 
 

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