12
   

The Democratic primary isn't anywhere as bitter as it looks online

 
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Tue 24 May, 2016 05:43 am
Yeah, some people will believe anything, especially long-time conservatives in love with Putin. Apart from the fact that Palmyra is the birth place of Assad's daddy, it had previously been a rebel stronghold. But as i said, some people will believe anything.

Assad reportedly struck an ominous deal with ISIS to recapture Palmyra

I'm from Palmyra, and can tell you – the Assad regime is no better than Isis

We should not celebrate Bashar al-Assad's victory over Isis in Palmyra

That larcenous scumbag Putin just propping up a former Soviet client, and he's doing it for PR only. The troops on the ground who re-took Palmyra weren't Russians, they were Shi'ah militia from Iraq and Hezbollah fighters, both of which are supported by Iran.

But ignorance is bliss, at least for conservatives in sheep's clothing, like Lash.

You told me you had me on ignore, Lash. You wouldn't lie, would you?
wmwcjr
 
  0  
Reply Tue 24 May, 2016 12:25 pm
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/ca/dc/f8/cadcf8e096e8d044d964f63f596ccf9d.jpg
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 May, 2016 04:04 pm
@wmwcjr,
Good one . . . the down vote weenies suck, too, so i voted that post up.
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 26 May, 2016 04:15 am
@Setanta,
Everybody who uses ignore clicks on the little green letters occasionally. Nope. Didn't lie. Just tried to break through your bias.

Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Thu 26 May, 2016 05:25 am
@Lash,
Ah-hahahahahahahahahahaha . . .

Which bias would that be? My anti-Putin bias? My bias against a murderous, lying, thieving scum bag?

I have a couple of people on ignore. I don't click on the green letters, because then it wouldn't be ignoring them. Keep voting down my posts, though.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  5  
Reply Thu 26 May, 2016 05:09 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:

My concern is that Trump will do better than I and everyone else expected in the general election


Yeah. I mean, you're obviously not alone in that worry. But I can't say I quite get it - even though I'm usually an incorrigible pessimist. Some of the commenters who warn about how Trump will overperform expectations say, look at how he did better in the primaries than everyone expected, he could surprise again in the general election. But the "everyone" in that sentence refers to all the pundits, politicians and regular people who were dismissing the polls. Because the polls had been showing Trump in the lead - by a lot - continuously - and since very early in the campaign (last July, in fact). The polls weren't wrong. And those same polls have pretty consistently shown Trump well behind in the general election throughout this election season.

Quote:
It's not the conservative Democrats that I'm concerned about, but the apolitical people who think that Trump is upending the system and who are inspired by his campaign.


The apolitical people who take part in elections would generally be independents, I imagine - and Trump polls horribly with independents. And a lot of the generally apolitical people who could still be spurred to vote in specific cases are women, young people, hispanics - all groups which have extremely unfavorable views of Trump, and might well be spurred to turn out this year specifically to stop him. And since you mention young people - if the polls can be trusted (and they've done allright with the global trends in the primaries), Trump's actually least popular among young voters, and most popular among the older / middle-aged. Again, who knows I suppose! I just don't see much non-anecdotal evidence for this.

Quote:
Among the youth online I see (which is not necessarily representative, I know)


Indeed. :-) If the most visibly politically engaged online youth were an indicator of how elections end up, Ron Paul would have been president. :-)
DrewDad
 
  3  
Reply Fri 27 May, 2016 09:47 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:
Independents are 43% of the voting public, and they do not heel to the word unite. They are from a different party... They have different priorities.

And I'm guessing that 99% of those 43% will still vote Democrat or Republican, Hillary or Trump.

For the rest, here's your standard-issue horse, lance, and suit of armor. The windmills are that-a-way.
Lash
 
  2  
Reply Fri 27 May, 2016 05:31 pm
@DrewDad,
A lot of independents were lured back to the process solely because of what Bernie stands for. Those people will just not vote. How many of them,...we'll see.

The Trump independents, I'm sure, are thrilled.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2016 12:20 am
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:
For the rest, here's your standard-issue horse, lance, and suit of armor. The windmills are that-a-way.


Excellent.
0 Replies
 
Lilkanyon
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2016 12:32 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Good one . . . the down vote weenies suck, too, so i voted that post up.


Lol! So did I cuz this latest election it reflects more true then not..
0 Replies
 
Lilkanyon
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 May, 2016 12:35 am
@nimh,
nimh wrote:

Robert Gentel wrote:

My concern is that Trump will do better than I and everyone else expected in the general election


Yeah. I mean, you're obviously not alone in that worry. But I can't say I quite get it - even though I'm usually an incorrigible pessimist. Some of the commenters who warn about how Trump will overperform expectations say, look at how he did better in the primaries than everyone expected, he could surprise again in the general election. But the "everyone" in that sentence refers to all the pundits, politicians and regular people who were dismissing the polls. Because the polls had been showing Trump in the lead - by a lot - continuously - and since very early in the campaign (last July, in fact). The polls weren't wrong. And those same polls have pretty consistently shown Trump well behind in the general election throughout this election season.

Quote:
It's not the conservative Democrats that I'm concerned about, but the apolitical people who think that Trump is upending the system and who are inspired by his campaign.


The apolitical people who take part in elections would generally be independents, I imagine - and Trump polls horribly with independents. And a lot of the generally apolitical people who could still be spurred to vote in specific cases are women, young people, hispanics - all groups which have extremely unfavorable views of Trump, and might well be spurred to turn out this year specifically to stop him. And since you mention young people - if the polls can be trusted (and they've done allright with the global trends in the primaries), Trump's actually least popular among young voters, and most popular among the older / middle-aged. Again, who knows I suppose! I just don't see much non-anecdotal evidence for this.

Quote:
Among the youth online I see (which is not necessarily representative, I know)


Indeed. :-) If the most visibly politically engaged online youth were an indicator of how elections end up, Ron Paul would have been president. :-)


This breaks my heart and makes me fear for the future of my children.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 04:55 pm
@nimh,
nimh wrote:
Yeah. I mean, you're obviously not alone in that worry. But I can't say I quite get it - even though I'm usually an incorrigible pessimist. Some of the commenters who warn about how Trump will overperform expectations say, look at how he did better in the primaries than everyone expected, he could surprise again in the general election. But the "everyone" in that sentence refers to all the pundits, politicians and regular people who were dismissing the polls. Because the polls had been showing Trump in the lead - by a lot - continuously - and since very early in the campaign (last July, in fact). The polls weren't wrong. And those same polls have pretty consistently shown Trump well behind in the general election throughout this election season.


Yeah the thinking from the pundits was that polls are just a snapshot and that he'd fall to earth but he didn't. And speaking of the polls they just showed him overtaking Hillary about a week ago, so I think there is cause for concern.

Quote:
Indeed. :-) If the most visibly politically engaged online youth were an indicator of how elections end up, Ron Paul would have been president. :-)


True dat!
sozobe
 
  3  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 05:01 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:
Yeah the thinking from the pundits was that polls are just a snapshot and that he'd fall to earth but he didn't. And speaking of the polls they just showed him overtaking Hillary about a week ago, so I think there is cause for concern.


Very briefly, and that was in keeping with the situation -- Trump wrapping up the nomination on his side and Hillary still locked in battle with Bernie. She's already regaining the lead and has yet to get her own nomination bump.

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/2016/president/us/general_election_trump_vs_clinton-5491.html

http://i.imgur.com/1h1ZCka.png

Not to mention that she seems to be making real inroads re: her latest line of attack:

Quote:
As Clinton and her team certainly anticipated, hitting him hard as mentally unstable and unfit for the presidency has placed Trump in a sort of Chinese finger puzzle of his own creation. The only mode of response he knows - an escalating and bellicose round of personal attacks with increasingly hyperbolic accusations - only confirms Clinton's diagnosis. The harder he fights the tighter the charge sticks.


http://talkingpointsmemo.com/edblog/sparks-of-the-meltdown
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 05:06 pm
@sozobe,
Thanks, I have been too busy to follow it the last week. Good to hear that the polls are trending that way and I've been hoping she kept up with the attacks on his temperament, he really only does seem to know how to respond one way and not in the way that that attack calls for.

Still concerned about the general election, so far each passing week I have been less confident in a Hillary victory.
sozobe
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 05:13 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Today alone has been pretty crazy for Trump. He's getting criticism left and right (literally) re: his attacks on the judge in the Trump U case, there is discord within his inner circle (people saying that it doesn't matter if he gets the best advisors, he ignores them and does his own thing), he's being extra-bitter and spazzy (read the whole TPM article I quoted above), and things are generally in going-off-the-rails territory.

Here's another article about what's up today:

http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2016-06-06/trump-orders-surrogates-to-intensify-criticism-of-judge-and-journalists

Also the ads are piling up -- just saw this one:



Hillary's a weak candidate. Luckily for her she's up against a REALLY weak candidate.
ossobuco
 
  3  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 05:27 pm
@sozobe,
Off the rails is the way he goes, I hope.
I think political scientists and psychologists will be ruminating about his behavior for a long time to come. I hope that won't somehow be while watching him in office. My own take is that part of what is going on is that he is self destructing on purpose, that he didn't get that he might actually win. Of course, that's just one more theory.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 05:35 pm
@ossobuco,
I'm actually a little worried that he's going so off the rails that someone more credible will still step in. I want him to be ridiculous enough to lose in a landslide but not so ridiculous that he doesn't even make it to the general election.

I don't think he's self-destructing on purpose. I think he's doing what worked in the primaries, which is to be blustery and dominant. The problem is that getting enough of a share of the crowded field amongst the subset of Republicans who care enough to vote in the primaries very different from what's needed to win a general election.

And the other problem is that his whole narrative is based on "winning." He had that in the primaries as polls showed him in the lead and he won a bunch of contests. In the general election, he doesn't have that. Hillary is regaining her lead in the polls and with a wrap-up tomorrow that's likely to only get larger.

I DO agree that he doesn't actually want to BE president, he just wants to win and get respect (and elevate his brand so he can make more money -- I'm also convinced he's not a 10-billionaire). I've been musing for quite a while what his possible exit route would be. Still don't see a viable one.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 05:35 pm
@ossobuco,
New Mexico's primary is tomorrow. I haven't really read up on it, remember seeing the expectations are that Hillary will win. I already voted absentee; much as I am not crazy about her, she got my vote.

I am actually watching re California. There was an article today about Bernie's team inquiring re him parachuting down to a town I used to pass by on Highway 101, Cloverdale.
Let me guess he doesn't do it..
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 05:41 pm
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:

Today alone has been pretty crazy for Trump.


But wait, there's more:

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/news/florida-ag-asked-trump-for-donation-before-nixing-trump-u-lawsuit

Quote:
Florida AG Asked Trump for Donation Before Nixing Trump U Lawsuit

WASHINGTON (AP) — Florida's attorney general personally solicited a political contribution from Donald Trump around the same time her office deliberated joining an investigation of alleged fraud at Trump University and its affiliates.

The new disclosure from Attorney General Pam Bondi's spokesman to The Associated Press on Monday provides additional details around the unusual circumstances of Trump's $25,000 donation to Bondi. After the money came in, Bondi's office nixed suing Trump.

The money came from a Trump family foundation in apparent violation of rules surrounding political activities by charities. A political group backing Bondi's re-election, called And Justice for All, reported receiving the check Sept. 17, 2013 — four days after Bondi publicly announced she was considering joining a New York state probe of Trump University's activities.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2016 05:44 pm
@sozobe,
Ah, I see your point. We need him to hang on to the train siding for a longer time, preferably to November or thereabouts. Or when? At least until it is too late to plug in someone else that is more palatable.

On his self destructing on purpose, that is only one of my theories, I have other sillier ones. But I agree he doesn't really want to be President. Maybe never did.
0 Replies
 
 

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