6
   

A look at the dark side of sharing bathrooms with women.

 
 
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 02:03 pm
Quote:
A comparison between the relative cleanliness of male and female restrooms (Table 8) showed that male restrooms were 1.5 times "cleaner" overall (1.5 times less total coliform contamination) and that female restrooms were contaminated with E. coli to a much greater extent. In female restrooms the sink (around the drain) was three times more likely to be contaminated with E. coli than the sink drains of the male restrooms. The trends are even more obvious when the toilet, sink, and floor areas were grouped for male and female restroom (Table 9). In frequency of total coliform occurrence, women out-do men nearly 2:1 in all areas. More specifically, in female restrooms, the floor area was 1.6 times more likely to be contaminated, the sink area was 1.9 times, and the toilet area was 1.8 times. The frequency of E. coli isolation was also greater in female restrooms. The E. coli was 4.5 times more often isolated in the sink area of female restrooms. There is a similar trend for the toilet area. Toilet area sites were contaminated with E. coli 1.9 times more often in female restrooms. The floors in male restrooms, however, are more often contaminated (1.7 times more often) with E. coli than the floors in the female restrooms.


https://www.ciriscience.org/a_67-Enteric-Bacterial-Contamination-of-Public-Restrooms

If we have to share a bathroom, I might need to start washing my hands.
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 02:10 pm
I don't believe your stats.

Men are pigs in the bathroom.

Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 02:15 pm
@PUNKEY,
Gasp!

I'll have you know that when I use the loo, I usually achieve an accuracy rate of at least 78%.

It's up in the nineties when I sit down.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 02:17 pm
@PUNKEY,
Your gender stereotype is factually incorrect.

There have been several peer reviewed studies that confirm that women's bathrooms have significantly higher rates of bacterial contamination then men's bathrooms.
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 02:37 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
the sink (around the drain) was three times more likely to be contaminated with E. coli than the sink drains of the male restrooms.
Interesting. What the hell are those women doing in the sink to account for this?
Linkat
 
  3  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 03:00 pm
@Leadfoot,
Leadfoot wrote:

Quote:
the sink (around the drain) was three times more likely to be contaminated with E. coli than the sink drains of the male restrooms.
Interesting. What the hell are those women doing in the sink to account for this?


Washing their hands that is what women are doing with the sink - that part makes sense. Men statistically wash their hands less so no poop in men's sinks. Women's hands are cleaner, but the sinks are dirtier - I'd prefer to have cleaner hands.
Leadfoot
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 03:02 pm
@Linkat,
That's logical, could be.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 03:11 pm
@Linkat,
Can you show me any data that men wash their hands less after they poop? I don't believe that this is correct. I have seen data that suggest that men don't wash their hands after they pee, but that is altogether different.

For that matter, can you show me any data to show that women's hands are cleaner then men's?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 04:38 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

Can you show me any data that men wash their hands less after they poop?


Is this PhD thesis material, or what?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 04:44 pm
@Leadfoot,
Escherichia coli is not usually a pathogen, way more often part of the normal flora. One variation of them is a pathogen, but generally it is a usual bacterium in our guts. The pathogenic one tends to show up in some processed ground beef, not bathrooms.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 04:50 pm
@ossobuco,
If I understand correctly this bacteria that is normally in your intestines is ending up in the bathroom sink (please correct me if I am wrong).

Doesn't this imply that fecal matter is involved?
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 04:58 pm
@maxdancona,
Yes, if it is showing up, it's likely fecal.

So what?

I said earlier I am not germ phobic. What do you think is on your skin? On your lips? between your toes? I'm plenty worried about some very resistant bacteria in hospitals now. Those are places where I seriously wash my hands (not that I don't in other restrooms).
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 05:04 pm
@ossobuco,
I am not germ-phobic either.

I am sure you realize that this is a response to the rather amusing germ-phobic posts in the "bright side... " thread and the "biggest mistake..." threads where women are expressing fear of sharing bathrooms with icky men.




ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 05:15 pm
@ossobuco,
My qualifications are old, long gone, but I remember some of what I learned. I have a vague memory of a brit teacher (he said "iss o late" instead of "eye so late"), and the vague memory is a warning about bacterial responses to challenge by antibiotics. That was early sixties.
That did happen.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 05:30 pm
@maxdancona,
Um, I wasn't all that amused, and didn't flash connect that was what this thread is about, but now I get it.

I do worry about Listeria on ships and cheese factories, especially one I liked to read about, and I worry about passage of Shigella (produce?), and Salmonella, probably long list, including old fashioned mayonnaise..

Still, I am not for keeping most toddlers away from dirt and not for sanitizing the counters of the world.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 05:33 pm
@ossobuco,
My microbiologist friend talks about his reaction to first realizing how many microbes we are exposed to in our environment every day. He went for a few weeks sterilizing everything he touched. Then he realized that his immune system was evolved enough to take care of it and that there wasn't anything else he could do anyway.

He told me this story with a baby in his arms. The baby dropped the pacifier on the floor and he picked it up and it went right back in the baby's mouth without so much as a wipe.

He said that freaking out and then realizing that microbes are an unavoidable (and usually benign) part of nature is part of the process taken by every microbiology student.

Was that your experience Osso?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 05:47 pm
@maxdancona,
I don't personally remember observing a five second rule. It amuses me now. Thing is, my floor is also me. I don't constantly sweep.

On immune system ready, I'd say six months re the thymus, but that is my olden view. I'm speaking fifty years later, re my taught stuff, so I don't know what the latest on the thymus is.

I did learn more, not re the thymus, over a decade or two later, and changed fields. Still interested.
0 Replies
 
momoends
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 02:09 am
@maxdancona,
That means you dont do that now after using the toilet?!!!! Disgusting!
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 06:39 am
@momoends,
I just made some coffee. Would you like a cup?
momoends
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 07:03 am
@maxdancona,
Let me make a visit to the restrooms first and ill be all yours
0 Replies
 
 

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