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Are there other words which are pronounced like 'bury'?

 
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Apr, 2016 08:26 pm
A little break with Amy Walker.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Apr, 2016 08:32 pm
@chai2,
Personally I feel the different accents in the feel in my mouth, and how it changes my outlook.

The NE is not so much a trumpet to me, but speaking through you nose, aggitating your brain.

Midwest stetches the roof of my mouth. Not really pleasant, but is easy to undertand.

The South? I'm prejudiced now, understand. I slipped long ago into saying INsurance rather than inSURance, and so forth. Not that anyone would mistake me for having been born south of the Mason Dixon.

All southern accents feel like I'm holding the words fully in my mouth, really experiencing them, even caressing them.

Even as a child, I never thought of southern accents as ignorant sounding. I thought of them as sensual.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 04:52 am
@farmerman,
I took sailing lessons at a yacht club in Annapolis. It was a case of kids getting out of jaguars, BMWs, Mercedes, and one kid was even dropped off from a Rolls. We'd a class in the yacht club in the morning and then go out on the water in the afternoon. On the Friday, it was in a Mustang, if i recall correctly, which was just a 16 foot open launch with a mast stepped. On Saturday and Sunday, we went out in the afternoon in Rainbow class sloops, 25 feet with an enclosed cabin. Completing the course (the check clearing was the most important test) entitled one to join their club flotilla in a cruise around the Chesapeake, and use of one of the Rainbows. Most kids sailed with their Mater and Pater in the family yacht. I had been with a young woman who was at Vassar and her morose young teenage sister. They were a lot of fun, even Miss Morose, who had a hard time being severe, what with being wet most of the time and sunburned. Their parents showed up with a 61 foot yawl rigged yacht. Having forgotten the keys to my yacht, i checked out one of the Rainbows. Miss Vassar and her sister decided to accompany me, although they slept aboard the yawl with M & P.

Whenever you were in one of the yacht club's boats, it would be in the charge of a local teenager. These were truly watermen born and bred for all that they were high school kids. Their accent wasn't too thick, but they spoke to us very slowly and loudly, the way people will when they think their auditor is not too bright. By Monday afternoon, Miss Vassar had had about enough of the kid in our boat, and every time he started to open his mouth, she'd tell him to shut up. It was pretty obvious that he had the big woody for her, so he'd shut up. As everyone relaxed, his accent got more marked, and i know what you mean about a probably Elizabethan origin. They were good kids, mostly, and a good time was had by all.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 12:12 pm
@Setanta,
computer crashed for a while. Mrs F was vacuming the office space where we keep the Wifi modem. She pulled the p[lugs to vacuum around and failed to reinstall.

61 footer. OH YEH, Ill bet the saloon was carefully crafted woods

I cred for a guy in a race years qgo. He hqd a huge boat and, by the time we rounded Cape Charles to Block Island, we wanted to kill the sumbitch. He became capt Queeg
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 03:43 pm
@farmerman,
I never saw the inside of that boat, but the parents were nice. They would buy lunch for all of us if we hit port at the same time, which we quickly learned to arrange. They weren't haughty or condescending, and it seemed that their only interest was that their daughters have a good time. I'd love to own that yawl.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 04:18 pm
@chai2,
My husbands family grew up on farms in Johnston County, North Carolina. The oldest members of the family would pronounce bury like burro, as best I can tell there are at least 3 different NC accents. There might be more but I'm only able to 'hear' three. I grew up in Maryland, we have several differing accents and many natives of the Eastern Shore sound to my ear like folks from farther south.

But back to bury, we always pronounced it as berry.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 04:41 pm
@glitterbag,
I lived in Johnston County for a while, in Smithfield, in fact. I don't recall that the word ever came up in conversation. Of course, if we needed to get rid of a body, we'd just drive over to the Cape Fear River, and toss it in.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 04:49 pm
@Setanta,
This thread is all news to me - I've rarely lived in the eastern US, much less going to England (et al) where a lot of the bury places are.
Educational.


0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 05:03 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

HA, We go over to Smith Island 'MERLIND" where they have that Eastern Shore " ELizabethan dialect"
Thats a good ratio of decipherable words. I can pick up whenever someone says "CRAYBS" n "ARSTERS". That usually means seafood




Maryland accents are a trip. I was born in Balmore/baltymore/or Baltamore depending on your location. My grandmother washed her dishes in the kitchen zinc. My grandfather would always check the uul in the car to make sure it wasn't low. Cooks would slather may naze in their potato salad. And be careful not to leave it out of the icebox too long er else it would spurl and you could get toemane poison. And if you exclaim 'oh no' it's pronounced 'oooo know'
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 05:31 pm
This entire topic is because the word bury meaning to inter the deceased and the word bury used in place names are related in an odd way. The root word means to raise a mound, as in bury meaning to inter. But it was also used to describe the activity of digging a ditch and throwing up a breastwork--when Alfred was king of Wessex, he had a system of simple earthwork fortifications built to protect the country from Danish and Norse raiders. Naturally, merchants and farmers with produce to sell gathered in such a place to transact their business, and where there not previously towns, new one sprang up. Alfred's eldest child, his daughter Æthelflæd jand his son Edward continued and expanded the practice so that "burhs" sprang up right across southern and central England.

Of absolutely no significance, but interesting to me is that having become christian, the Anglo-Saxons did no knuckle under entirely to church authority. Specifically, they continued to use the "pagan" names which they preferred and their ancestors had used. Ælfrǣd (Alfred) means elf's counsel, or wise elf. Æthelflæd means noble beauty, and Ælfgifu, gift of the elves, was another popular name for a girl child. Alas, when Harold of Wessex (Harold means leader of the army) was defeated at the battle of Hastings, the Normans took over, and everybody got stuck with wimpy saint's names.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 05:54 pm
@Setanta,
My in-laws had a small tobacco farm in Archers Lodge, Johnston County. I never lived there myself, but that's where my in-laws are buried and where husbands grandparents had farms. It's hard to pinpoint when his family arrived in N.C. but the small cemetery holds relatives who were born in the 1880's and there is some evidence of several relatives who were part of the Confederacy who returns to Johnston County at the end of their enlistment or the war. We found the name of a great grandfather at a memorial near Charleston, SC, Well we think he was the great grandfather because mr. g'bag grand dad had the same name. We haven't located any birth certificates that would verify the info, that's just a guess on our part.

When you lived in Johnston County did they have the Percy Flowers shopping center? Percy sold moon shine in his hey day, and became very rich. Now he is viewed as a benefactor (of sorts)
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 05:59 pm
I don't remember the shopping center, but Percy well well-known and well-liked when i lived there. He was in the Neuse River prison camp when i lived there, and by all accounts, he lived the life of Riley, despite being incarcerated. The moonshine trade didn't miss a beat.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 06:05 pm
I think Percy Flowers is a great name for a moon shiner.
0 Replies
 
 

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