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Why is suicide wrong?

 
 
Robin Macson
 
  0  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 03:01 am
Is it wrong to have suicidal thoughts. No!!
There is probably not a person in the world that has not thought about taking their own life at one time or another but to act on those thoughts is wrong.

We need to stop telling our children that Suicide is not wrong but an illness. We need to tell them that while you may have those thoughts the act itself is cowardly and extremely selfish. Suicide is someone giving up on life and thinking that the pain that they feel will never pass. Thinking that there is no future. With everyday comes something new. Another challenge, another tragedy, another loss or even a little hope. I am not sure how one cannot consider this act wrong. We tell our children that you should never give up. Suicide is just that giving up. I lost my fiancé just about 12 years ago. After Robin Williams suicide and the media coverage I have been having a very tough time. Asphxiation. The word echoed across a crowded bar from the TV and I have been filled with anger and rage since. My fiance was not a coward and he was far from selfish but that night he was. I want to point out the fact that he was also drunk, out of a job and like myself dealing with bills he couldn't afford. We had a lot going on and most of it not good. That night we had an argument and I left the house. My daughter was asleep in her crib. He took his life in our bedroom with me not home and our daughter left in her crib to fend for herself. He chose to leave us behind. It was his choice to put the twist tie around his neck. If he had chose to walk out the door and not return you would be saying that is wrong leaving all of his responsibilities behind for me to deal with. If there is anyone in your life at all suicide is wrong. You choose to leave the people in your life forever asking WHY? Forever heart broken and all because you chose to give up.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Apr, 2016 09:33 am
@Robin Macson,
What you 'label' as 'wrong', is down to YOU.
Don't 'force' your labels upon others, whose boots you have never trod a step in.
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  3  
Reply Tue 19 Apr, 2016 07:34 pm
@Robin Macson,
Quote:
You choose to leave the people in your life forever asking WHY?
You could leave a note saying Why.

No one should have to live just for the sake of another.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Apr, 2016 07:42 pm
@Leadfoot,
Good points.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 04:55 am
@Leadfoot,
Leadfoot wrote:

Quote:
You choose to leave the people in your life forever asking WHY?
You could leave a note saying Why.

No one should have to live just for the sake of another.

That go for parents living for the sake of their innocent children, too?
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 07:14 am
@snood,
Quote:
That go for parents living for the sake of their innocent children, too?
Independent children or dependent ones? In the first case, of course it goes. I love my children dearly but I've never thought there was anything sacred about blood relations. I love them because they are great people.

"The bond that links your true family is not of blood, but of Love, respect and joy in each others' lives"
- Richard Bach

In the case of dependent children (which is probably a rare scenario for one wanting to die) I would say it would be your obligation to arrange for their care before going. If you are at the point of wanting out of this existence, you are probably of no help to your children anyway.
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 08:17 am
@Leadfoot,
Quote:
In the case of dependent children (which is probably a rare scenario for one wanting to die) I would say it would be your obligation to arrange for their care before going. If you are at the point of wanting out of this existence, you are probably of no help to your children anyway.


Opinion and assumption stated as facts.

0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 08:24 am
@Leadfoot,
And, I'll just say In my opinion there is enough intrinsic interrelation (and yes interdependence) between familiar humans that to take only one's own well being into consideration when contemplating suicide is arguably selfishness to an immoral degree.
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 09:59 am
@snood,
I have run into many people who worship at the alter of family. It can be a hard habit to kick.

PS: I did say 'Probably'...
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 10:11 am
@Leadfoot,
Leadfoot wrote:

I have run into many people who worship at the alter of family. It can be a hard habit to kick.

PS: I did say 'Probably'...

I say families are intrinsically interdependent. You say that's "worshiping at the altar" of family. Well, I've met people who overuse hyperbole as a tool in trying to gain advantage in a debate.
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 11:38 am
@snood,
Quote:
I say families are intrinsically interdependent. You say that's "worshiping at the altar" of family. Well, I've met people who overuse hyperbole as a tool in trying to gain advantage in a debate.
Oh ****, now I have to make myself look like a delusional dick head again.

I wasn't using hyperbole. I meant it just as you saw it. Didn't learn it from the bible but the book agrees. In it, Jesus says who ever loves other things (including family) more than him is not worthy of him. There are whole religions who make family the center of their belief.

But theology aside, I would think it cruel of me to demand my mother or father live a life of agony for my sake.
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 12:07 pm
@Leadfoot,
Leadfoot wrote:

Quote:
I say families are intrinsically interdependent. You say that's "worshiping at the altar" of family. Well, I've met people who overuse hyperbole as a tool in trying to gain advantage in a debate.
Oh ****, now I have to make myself look like a delusional dick head again.

I wasn't using hyperbole. I meant it just as you saw it. Didn't learn it from the bible but the book agrees. In it, Jesus says who ever loves other things (including family) more than him is not worthy of him. There are whole religions who make family the center of their belief.

But theology aside, I would think it cruel of me to demand my mother or father live a life of agony for my sake.

Again, non-sequitur if the child is an infant or toddler. They made no demands save being born. Does responsibility to other people play any part in your paradigm? What's wrong with not committing suicide because someone needs you?
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 01:52 pm
@snood,
You can or can't afford it !
What's the part of it you don't get eh ? People that do it couldn't at all afford it. FACT !
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 06:30 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
Fil Albuquerque wrote:

You can or can't afford it !
What's the part of it you don't get eh ? People that do it couldn't at all afford it. FACT !

Hey brother, as long as YOU understand whatever it is that you just blathered, God's in his heaven and all is well.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 07:17 pm
@snood,
My father attempted suicide when he was eighty. When the neighbor called to tell me I first thought he had an accident and was on his way to the hospital. Then she told me he was in the back yard and had wrapped a child's swing around his neck.............it didn't sink in instantly, but I said "are you telling me he tried to hang himself?" And there was a pause and then she said, "I'm sorry, yes". I was numb when I headed to the hospital, when I saw him he had an angry red abrasion around his throat and he looked so tired. All I said was "Daddy, what happened? " and he started to cry. I hadn't called him daddy since I was a very little girl. It broke my heart that he had been so anguished and I didn't realize how much he ached. He didn't manage to kill himself that day, and when he told me why he did it, to me it was so overwhelmingly sad.

I suppose I was lucky because he wasn't successful and the problem he thought was insurmountable was fixable. I'm glad he wasn't successful, but just the anguish involved knowing he could have ended his life was more disturbing than I can describe. Sadly, not everyone ends their life to avoid an excruciatingly painful untreatable illness, many end their lives because they are overwhelmed by sadness and can't see a way out.

I'm not taking a stance on suicide, I'm not in a position to judge other's pain, I'm just relieved my dad wasn't successful.
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 07:54 pm
@glitterbag,
I'm not taking a strict "stance" on suicide either - I'm just against the idea being casually bandied about that it's as simple as 'If someone wants to, it's their business and no one else's' - that's all.

glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Apr, 2016 09:51 pm
@snood,
I don't disagree with you, sometimes the issue is treated too flippantly.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2016 07:39 am
@snood,
Then you must appreciate that your opinion is just that?
I'm with 'Lead' on this matter.
'To be or not to be'.
A great quote from Francis Bacon.
My choice to live, my choice to not.
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2016 03:50 am
@snood,
Quote:
Again, non-sequitur if the child is an infant or toddler. They made no demands save being born. Does responsibility to other people play any part in your paradigm? What's wrong with not committing suicide because someone needs you?
Keep in mind I'm talking about people who are capable of rationally considering ending their own life, not the mentally ill or people too young to have a grasp on this life.
If not one of those examples, I did say that I would feel responsible for providing for the needs of my dependent children before leaving life.

You might say "but what about their emotional needs?" I can only say from my own life's experience that a person ready to leave this life is not in a position to provide for the emotional needs of anyone. My own father was in perfect health when he took his own life but he had never been capable of providing more than my physical needs (which he did). We never agreed about much but as adults we spent many hours discussing our views of life and I knew he was a tortured soul. I did not begrudge him his exit and I can not imagine a more hellish situation than a life lived for no other reason than another's need for me to be alive.

I'm not in that situation now but if I ever am, I'll leave with a clear continence.
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2016 05:54 am
@Leadfoot,
G D spellcheck. Make that clear conscience. :-)
0 Replies
 
 

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