16
   

When will Bernie give up his candidacy?

 
 
Brand X
 
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 08:19 am
Is the unicorn tour about over?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 16 • Views: 3,864 • Replies: 94

 
revelette2
 
  4  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 08:36 am
@Brand X,
I don't agree with the labelling but I don't think he will stop his campaign until the convention and he has the funds to keep going. I think he should stay in, he keeps Hillary on her toes plus tilts her a little more left and makes the conversation more left. A good thing all around.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 08:45 am
@Brand X,
I think Sanders is going to stay in until the convention, but I think the tone is probably going to change somewhat. He's lost. Sure, there are plenty of states left, but they all award delegates proportionally. He is hundreds behind on directly elected delegates and that doesn't even count the super delegates where he is many hundreds behind. He didn't make a mark with Hispanics in Texas or African Americans in the South, he lost Massachusetts, a state where the demographics noticeably favored him. He did have nice wins in Oklahoma and Colorado, but it's just not enough. He may actually get less delegates in Colorado than Clinton (due to the way the counties break out) and will likely only get a handful more in Oklahoma. In Texas, Clinton beat him by almost a hundred delegates. I think the move from here on out is to push his agenda and keep Clinton left of center but back off the direct confrontations unless Clinton starts to tack back to center.
Brand X
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 10:25 am
Yes, he's just an old man who needed a bully pulpit to say what he's wanted to say for several years but needed a bigger megaphone. I agree he'll keep going because he 'owes' it to his minions.... and because he thinks he's whipping America's ass.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  3  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 10:33 am
Bernie speaks for me. And he also resonates with the 18-34 demographic... an important group for the future direction of the party and of the country. He probably won't win the White House, but he is paving the way for a true progressive president in the coming years.

President Warren will owe him a debt of gratitude (as will we all). This has happened before, Goldwater paved the way for President Reagan.

Foofie
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 12:47 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

Bernie speaks for me. And he also resonates with the 18-34 demographic... an important group for the future direction of the party and of the country. He probably won't win the White House, but he is paving the way for a true progressive president in the coming years.

President Warren will owe him a debt of gratitude (as will we all). This has happened before, Goldwater paved the way for President Reagan.



Women's open toed summer shoes "paved" the way for flip flops, women losing their tolerance of living in winter wear for summer weather. Similarly, candidates just reflect what will be bought by the changing/growing voting constituencies. The tail does not wag the dog. Remember the party "markets" a brand that has a chance to become a majority's preference.

0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  5  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 12:57 pm
@Brand X,
Brand X wrote:

Is the unicorn tour about over?

It's funny you should label Sander's campaign as a unicorn tour when he is no worse (and often better) than the Republicans who are offering their constituents "yuge" giveaways. Trump's tax proposal would cost 9.5 TRILLION over ten years. This election is practically a unicorn farm. Clinton is pretty much the only one trying to keep it in the realm of reality.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 01:00 pm
@engineer,
this

engineer wrote:
He didn't make a mark with Hispanics in Texas or African Americans in the South


is key

____

does anyone have a sense how Warren works with those demographics?
0 Replies
 
Brand X
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 01:22 pm
@engineer,
I agree. My remark about Bernie was not a right vs. left thing.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 03:15 pm
@Brand X,
He said he's going all the way and has the money to do so. Definitely doesn't look like he will win (though still reasonably possible). I agree with engineer completely on all his said too.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 04:37 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Markos Moulitsis, of DailyKos, has a pretty good piece why Bernie Sanders' movement didn't take off.

http://www.dailykos.com/stories/2016/3/2/1494621/-A-real-liberal-revolution-starts-with-communities-of-color
0 Replies
 
Brand X
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2016 06:07 pm
@Robert Gentel,
I partly think after he gets way more behind HRC he'll bow out so as not to be a distraction. I don't think he'll slam her for being a Wall Street whore then at the very end say she'll be great as prez.....he'll need to leave some cushion before the Convention.
0 Replies
 
revelette2
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2016 01:13 pm
Stop Bernie-Splaining to Black Voters

Quote:
Now that Iowa and New Hampshire are vanishing in the rearview mirror, the Democratic contests shift more West and South — beginning with Nevada and South Carolina, states that have significantly more Hispanic or black voters, respectively, who at this point disproportionately favor Hillary Clinton to Bernie Sanders.


This support for Clinton, particular among African-American voters, is for some perplexing and for others irritating.

I cannot tell you the number of people who have commented to me on social media that they don’t understand this support. “Don’t black folks understand that Bernie best represents their interests?” the argument generally goes. But from there, it can lead to a comparison between Sanders and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; to an assertion that Sanders is the Barack Obama that we really wanted and needed; to an exasperated “black people are voting against their interests” stance.

If only black people knew more, understood better, where the candidates stood — now and over their lifetimes — they would make a better choice, the right choice. The level of condescension in these comments is staggering.

Sanders is a solid candidate and his integrity and earnestness are admirable, but that can get lost in the noise of advocacy.

Tucked among all this Bernie-splaining by some supporters, it appears to me, is a not-so-subtle, not-so-innocuous savior syndrome and paternalistic patronage that I find so grossly offensive that it boggles the mind that such language should emanate from the mouths — or keyboards — of supposed progressives.

But then I am reminded that the idea that black folks are infantile and must be told what to do and what to think is not confined by ideological barriers. The ideological difference is that one side prefers punishment and the other pity, and neither is a thing in which most black folks delight.

It is not so much that black voters love Clinton and loathe Sanders. Indeed, in The Nation magazine, the estimable Michelle Alexander makes a strong case in an essay titled “Why Hillary Clinton Doesn’t Deserve the Black Vote.” For many there isn’t much passion for either candidate. Instead, black folks are trying to keep their feet planted in reality and choose from among politicians who have historically promised much and delivered little. It is often a choice between the devil you know and the one you don’t, or more precisely, among the friend who betrays you, the stranger who entices you and the enemy who seeks to destroy you.

It is not black folks who need to come to a new understanding, but those whose privileged gaze prevents them from seeing that black thought and consciousness is informed by a bitter history, a mountain of disappointment and an ocean of tears
.

0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2016 10:55 pm
I think he should suspend his campaign after his dismal performance tonight. While 2 of the states were close (essentially ties) the media will write "Clinton sweeps Sanders" and it will dominate the news cycle for a while.

Plus the math just isn't there; Sanders will need something like 63% of ALL the remaining vote to catch up to her (not even counting super delegates). His campaign is OVER whether or not he admits it.
Brand X
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2016 04:42 am
Yep. Unless he just wants to hang on to give BLM a microphone.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2016 04:59 am
@Brand X,
Still, his campaign is useful even though he can't win. It pisses many idiots off, for a start.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2016 06:27 am
@maporsche,
I don't think he should suspend it since he has a message, a platform on which to give it and some passion to be heard. I do think he should move to a unifying position and use his influence to get Clinton to fully commit to some of his causes. There are two more potential debates and if they happen, they should be less about debating each other and more about debating the Trump narrative from their unique positions along the political spectrum. I also think there could be some horse trading on the VP nomination. Sanders could push for Warren as a candidate in return for his full support in November.
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2016 10:58 pm
@engineer,
Yes. Since he isent a true democrat he could try to hold her hostage to a vice presidential spot for himself.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  3  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2016 11:05 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:

I don't think he should suspend it since he has a message, a platform on which to give it and some passion to be heard. I do think he should move to a unifying position and use his influence to get Clinton to fully commit to some of his causes. There are two more potential debates and if they happen, they should be less about debating each other and more about debating the Trump narrative from their unique positions along the political spectrum. I also think there could be some horse trading on the VP nomination. Sanders could push for Warren as a candidate in return for his full support in November.


I think he should keep campaigning because it has a net positive overall effect on the Democrats. He can make an indelible change to the platform; he can hold on to the gains he's made in pushing Clinton left (and his coalition can serve to hold her accountable on the things she shifted on); he will still have coattails that will make him a force to be reckoned with, even not being the nominee.
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Mar, 2016 09:36 pm
@snood,
I think he will stay but I hope he dont go republican on us and go into attack mode.
 

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