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NJ Governor resigns: "I am a gay American"

 
 
Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Aug, 2004 10:26 pm
Sofia wrote:
This is going to get dirty.


Makes one wonder if someone is encouraging the boy friend to make it that way.
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Sofia
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Aug, 2004 10:29 pm
Could be.

Or, he could be telling the truth.

Guess we'll see.
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Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 07:41 am
I know for sure I read 'Gus's boyfriend' instead of 'Guv's boyfriend'. Oh well Rolling Eyes
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 08:56 am
The wrath of the boy friend scorned? I am aware that policians are by-and-large lacking in social intelligence. A good example is the current occupier of the White House. His little lame jokes and pet names are patronizing and childish. Anyone see the essay in September Vanity Fair,
"The Monarchy of George II" by Niall Ferguson? Devastingly funny and on target with a classic political cartoon on Page 383.
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sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 10:16 am
It's not going to "get" dirty, it IS dirty.

And?
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 10:32 am
Straight people are just as lacking in getting involved with dubious relationships and one result is the high divorce rate.
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blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 10:42 am
As long as men, both hetero and homosexual use their "brain branch office" to do all their thinking this kind of thing will happen, and as long as no one has anything better to do it will be a nine days wonder everytime. This guy has traumatized his family and risked passing on an STD to his wife. He's an ass hole.....next.
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PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 11:00 am
Arianna Huffington makes about a dozen cogent points on the subject:

Quote:
On Thursday, my day started at eight in the morning speaking together with New Jersey Senator Jon Corzine at a breakfast sponsored by ANGLE -- an organization consisting of the gay and lesbian leadership of Southern California and a magnet for political candidates running for office and raising funds. A couple of hours after I had left the breakfast, where I had been surrounded by successful gay men and women -- businesspeople, politicians, accountants, even a priest -- my phone started ringing off the hook. New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey had just resigned and announced that he is gay, and it seemed as if the bookers from every television talk show in America -- from CNN's "American Morning" to ABC's "Nightline" -- had simultaneously had the exact same thought: "Let's get Arianna Huffington." I was the proverbial two birds being killed with one stone -- a political commentator whose ex-husband had come out as gay.

As the day progressed, it became clear that this was a story unfolding on so many levels only a Shakespearean drama or a Verdi opera could do justice to it. There was the personal, the political, possibly the legal, and who knows what else to be revealed by the time we get to Act Five.

But we are still in Act One. And in Act One the spotlight is on the nexus of the personal and the political. McGreevey's resignation announcement was undoubtedly the best political speech he's ever made. It was powerful, compelling, emotional, and in sharp contrast to the pre-packaged speechifying we are so accustomed to hearing from politicians. At this profound crisis point in his political and personal lives he sounded almost liberated. It's hard to resist playing armchair psychoanalyst and wondering: Did McGreevey unconsciously make certain choices -- like putting his lover on the government payroll in a high-profile position he was not qualified for -- in order to force upon himself Thursday's public announcement: "I am a gay American"?

We can't, of course, know what was going on in McGreevey's psyche, but hiring his lover, Golan Cipel -- an Israeli foreign national unable to obtain a federal security clearance to be the homeland security czar of New Jersey (and at a salary of $110,000 a year, no less) -- is the height of recklessness, and only makes sense as a taxpayer-funded cry for help. Clearly no good could come of such an appointment -- unless the governor was unconsciously hoping that the appointment would eventually force his hand. Otherwise, he would not have flaunted his closeness to Cipel, leading him to self-destructive acts such as accompanying Cipel and a Realtor on a walkthrough of a townhouse the newly arrived Israeli was about to rent a short distance from McGreevey's house. It's textbook human behavior: the harder you try to suppress the truth, the more inevitable it is that it will find a way to come out.

"Thinking that I was doing the right thing," he said, "I forced what I thought was an acceptable reality onto myself, a reality which is layered and layered with all the, quote, 'good things,' and all the, quote, 'right things' of typical adolescent and adult behavior." It's worth noting that McGreevey made this statement on the same day that the California Supreme Court annulled the state's 4000 same-sex marriages, raising the question: What if the world were a more welcoming place where gay people could have in their lives all the "good things" and the "right things" without having to pretend they're straight? After all, does anyone doubt that it's exponentially harder to attain elective office if you're openly gay? How else do you explain that we have no gay senators, only three gay members of Congress, and an openly gay governor of New Jersey only until Nov. 15?

But even if Jim McGreevey did not want to hold public office, if he just wanted a marriage and children -- natural urges, perhaps as powerful as the sexual one -- the easiest (and indeed the only legal way) to do so remains opting for a heterosexual relationship. So the human costs we only got a glimpse of on Thursday -- a shattered marriage, the anguish inflicted on his parents, his wife, his daughters -- are not just the result of his personal choices but of the roadblocks society continues to place in the path of the complete acceptance of gay men and women.

By the time the curtain comes up on this drama's Act Five we could be in the middle of a serious political scandal that may force McGreevey to step down even before Nov. 15. Or we may be in the middle of his political resurrection, looking not at a tortured politician with a secret draining away precious energy but a free man fully -- and finally -- accepting himself. Either way, he had to practically drive the car right off the cliff in order to put himself on the road to Thursday's declaration. And that's an indictment of our society and our political culture wars.

So until the final curtain falls, let's seize the moment to reaffirm, loudly and without reservation, that to be gay is to be normal -- whether you're a governor or a gardener, a public figure or a very private one.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 12:03 pm
She hasn't made any points I can't agree with. Before we villify the governor or his ex-lover we need to have more facts come out.
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 12:05 pm
For some reason I thought Huffington was a light weight. I was surprised by her skill in finding a different angle.
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 12:12 pm
DL I remember her as a different kind of person. Do you think her experience mellowed her out a little?
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doglover
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 12:17 pm
An experience like that can't help but change a person I would think. In Ms. Huffingtons situation, she fell in love with and married a man who she assumed was straight. When she learned that he was homosexual, nothing about him changed but his sexual preference. Her love for him did not cease, but instead, took on another form. I think she learned that a person is not defined primarily by their sexuality but instead by their character, loyalty, generosity...etc.
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 12:18 pm
Well said.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 01:50 pm
Great little paragraph there, doglover. You're exactly right. The possibility is that politicians can be bribed for many different indiscretions in their past so the are all vulnerable. Not a good reason to resign. I don't know how many gay men have gotten married straight and in complete denial of their true sexuality. It doesn't work. You're either wired than way or you're not. It's bisexuals I have a problem understanding.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 01:52 pm
AC, DC -- isn't that a short in the wiring?
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 01:54 pm
exotic wiring in the shorts
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Sofia
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 01:57 pm
I think he should go to jail.

Giving anyone who is completely lacking in experience such a serious job in protecting the state is a crime. To give it as a payoff is disgusting.

I don't know why he is still in the state house. Sexual orientation has nothing to do with it. He seems to be trying to ue his sexual orientation to cloud the issue of what he did.
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 02:00 pm
Perhaps he is. Perhaps the fact that his mistress was a man is even more infuriating than all the cases of mistresses being put on the payroll who were women.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 02:08 pm
And how many times do you suppose that's happened and was undetected? I know it's happened in several private companies I've worked for.
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doglover
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Aug, 2004 02:08 pm
panzade wrote:
Perhaps he is. Perhaps the fact that his mistress was a man is even more infuriating than all the cases of mistresses being put on the payroll who were women.


LOL...you do have a way with words sometimes panzade.
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