13
   

What/How Will THE DONALD Do at "Debate2"?

 
 
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 04:20 am
There is a high chance that he will do at least fine, but will he do great and if so how he will go about it IDK. I have this fantasy about him being in command of the facts, sounding all presidential and ****, and giving lectures to the rest of these yahoos on competence and WINNING. That he will completely surprise, confuse and make look stupid everyone else.

Now is the time for the grand move, as Trump surely knows. Let's see if he can pull it off.

The thing that everyone forgets is it is not that Donald is so great a politician, it is that our professional politicians really suck generally. The bar to entry to this game vanished a long time ago, because good people dont want to go into this line of work, once money no longer matters ( and lets be real, the elite only fund people they control) the political game of the pros aint much. Modern politicians are to politics what Justin Bieber is to music, glossy and manufactured products animated by bums.

We are a bit over 20 hours till we see if I am right. Again. Or maybe I am wrong. I am not confident enough to give odds that trump hits this one out of the park.
 
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 04:32 am
@hawkeye10,
And 4-6 really biting insults need to make it in, new ones of course. And a nice rant against the elite and their ******* politically correct nonsense.
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 05:10 am
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

There is a high chance that he will do at least fine, but will he do great and if so how he will go about it IDK. I have this fantasy about him being in command of the facts, sounding all presidential and ****, and giving lectures to the rest of these yahoos on competence and WINNING. That he will completely surprise, confuse and make look stupid everyone else.

Now is the time for the grand move, as Trump surely knows. Let's see if he can pull it off.

The thing that everyone forgets is it is not that Donald is so great a politician, it is that our professional politicians really suck generally. The bar to entry to this game vanished a long time ago, because good people dont want to go into this line of work, once money no longer matters ( and lets be real, the elite only fund people they control) the political game of the pros aint much. Modern politicians are to politics what Justin Bieber is to music, glossy and manufactured products animated by bums.

We are a bit over 20 hours till we see if I am right. Again. Or maybe I am wrong. I am not confident enough to give odds that trump hits this one out of the park.


Yup...you are into fantasy.
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 05:30 am
@Frank Apisa,
Or he could just say "that is why I hire the best people, to make sure I have the best opinions and options when I decide what to do." Then he can launch into an attack of the "journalist" on the grounds that they are asking BS gottcha questions, why dont they do their jobs, and point out that these professional politicians here will just lie and then do what ever they want if they got the job but Donald Trump is going to tell you the people the truth....because we deserve it.

Donald Trump is good enough at this game to pull of this move, though it is advanced. He knows that the questions about minutia are coming, he certainly must have a plan. I am hoping that the first one is on ISIS or the Russians or China, and that Trump response "that is why the United States Government employs so many great Generals and diplomats, to advise the president and then to carry out his orders. I would not presume to tell them how to do their jobs, and I will do mine".
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 05:38 am
@hawkeye10,
http://eskipaper.com/images/fantasy-world-8.jpg
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 05:41 am
@Frank Apisa,
That begs the question: If Trump were to prove good at this game would you consider supporting him? You claim to be an independent, surely a good politician who will disrupt Washington is just what America needs right now. You have to consider Trump, right?
engineer
 
  5  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 07:20 am
@hawkeye10,
If Trump were to suddenly show himself to have a good grasp of issues, I would at least listen, but I have to say his comments on immigration and women are pretty damning at this point and his stock answer "I would hire people to do that" to just about every policy question doesn't work for me. I don't consider him a typical Republican on many issues and he has a good independent streak, but to get my vote, you actually have to take stands on issues and the few he's actually addressed don't make me think he's put any effort into understanding them.
0 Replies
 
revelette2
 
  3  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 07:45 am
To avoid getting into any issues he will probably pick out someone to pick on and or state some outrageous remark. I am not sure what his game is but I still have hard time thinking he is serious. Maybe he got offered billions of dollars to sabotage the whole republican party.

http://www.tvtoymemories.com/sitebuilder/images/BIG_Dont_Vote_for_Brewster_movie_prop_campaign_button_with_Richard_Pryor_Brewsters_Millions-257x257.jpg
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 08:19 am
I want to see a Sanders v. Trump debate. Which man will suffer a heart attack first? Neutral
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  3  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 12:13 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

That begs the question: If Trump were to prove good at this game would you consider supporting him? You claim to be an independent, surely a good politician who will disrupt Washington is just what America needs right now. You have to consider Trump, right?


Not even if a gun were held to my head...even though I consider him one of the best things to ever happen to the progressive agenda.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 01:40 pm
Quote:
Yes, anything can happen, but this is the safest bet on the board: Donald Trump will say something absurd and/or offensive, the professional pundits will roll their eyes and sigh, and the man who has been topping the national GOP polls for more than two months will still be the Republican front-runner when the post-debate dust settles.

Remember: The brassy billionaire was unexpectedly roughed up by Fox News moderators in Cleveland, yet viewers at home saw something quite different than the chattering class did on their screens. Despite what could generously be called an uneven performance in his first-ever debate as a candidate, the Donald came out on top in pretty much every insta-poll that followed and likewise saw his support climb in the more scientific surveys that came after.

The current GOP front-runner has even more working in his favor this time around. Trump’s decision to publicly pledge his loyalty to the Republican Party means he won’t be forced to relive Fox News’ show-of-hands gambit that put him on the defensive early in Ohio. He’s also no longer a debate newbie. The real estate tycoon now knows what it’s like to share a stage with his GOP rivals and—even more importantly—knows that his Trumpian brand of belligerence and bluster works just as well on the debate stage as it does on the stump. And if all that weren’t enough, the tough-talking self-hype man also now has the luxury of knowing what type of attacks will be coming from Jeb Bush and co., and what type of questions to expect from conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt and the CNN moderators.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/09/16/cnn_debate_preview_donald_trump_will_win_and_other_predictions_ahead_of.html
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 07:55 pm
@hawkeye10,
Hmmm, he has been fairly sedate so far. I am still hoping for a " I own this stage" moment but not so far.
0 Replies
 
McGentrix
 
  0  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 08:12 pm
The more I see of Dr. Carson, the more I like him. I just wish he wasn't secretly crazy.
hawkeye10
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 09:38 pm
@McGentrix,
I just looked at 3 snap polls, all have Trump winning convincingly with Fiorina Second. It looks like the liberal media elite are picking Fiorina. Carson did not do what he needed to do, but he did better than the establishment candidates, they got no traction.

NONE.

This, plus the fact that Hillary is getting no place with Sanders, has got to Scare the hell out of Hillary. The establishment has gunned for Trump big time in two debates, and completely missed both times. And the other Amateurs are getting a lot of attention.

Even the idiot elite cant help but to notice now what I have been saying for years....they have lost the people.
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 09:51 pm
@hawkeye10,
from Redstate

Quote:
Impossible to Quantify

1. Donald Trump – I’ve long ago stopped trying to predict what will or won’t affect Donald Trump’s standing in this race. As usual, his answer to every question is that he is leading in the polls. He out of nowhere took a petulant and pointless swipe at Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) 87%‘s standing in the polls (and his looks) in the response to his first question. He came off as the clear loser in at least two exchanges with Carly Fiorina (and the narrow winner in one other). His body language when confronted on the Florida casino deal was purely Joe Pesci in My Cousin Vinny. On the other hand, he got the better of Jeb Bush, which seems to be his only goal in life. I give up trying to predict what will happen with Trump. He was there. He was at the center of the stage. He was Trump. Any other candidate would have been destroyed by his performance tonight – but also, any other candidate would have been destroyed by every public performance he has literally ever had. I give up.


http://www.redstate.com/2015/09/16/winners-losers-cnnsalem-debate/
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 16 Sep, 2015 09:53 pm
In other news Walker did so poorly that he is done. This is the most extreme flameout we have seen in a long time, in either party. The Elite like to love him, the people dont.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:49 am
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
And a nice rant against the elite and their ******* politically correct nonsense.


Trump is one of the elite. You're confusing elite with educated. You don't like educated people because they can see what a complete idiot you are. You're quite willing to lick the elite's backside because you're an uneducated lickspittle.

And you were wrong. Again. Trump looked like a dick, to anyone except a semi literate lickspittle that is.

Quote:
Donald Trump has come under attack from all sides in a fiery debate between the top Republican presidential candidates in the 2016 election.

The party's frontrunner, a billionaire businessman with no political experience, refused to apologise over comments about the wife of Jeb Bush.

And he was on the receiving end when Carly Fiorina drew huge applause facing up to his recent jibe over her looks.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-34275105
revelette2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:55 am
@izzythepush,
Amazing that this is what the republican party has come to in it's presidential debates. Jabs and insults and talking about looks. It is embarrassing. It is all thanks to Hawkeye's hero, Trump.
revelette2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:59 am
Quote:
Jeb leaves a vacuum. Who fills it?

If you were in Washington watching the Republican debate last night, you might have felt a small tilt in the floor, or heard the plates rattling gently in their cupboards.

That was the sound of the Republican establishment shifting its collective weight away from Jeb Bush — and inching a little bit closer to their best available alternative.

And no, it’s not Ben Carson or Carly Fiorina.

Not to overstate the crisis here, because one poll can change everything at this stage of a race, but the way I saw it, last night was another minor disaster for Bush. He seemed, yet again, oddly tentative and squirmy, the earnest student body president shoved aside by the boorish quarterback at the pep rally.

That performance probably didn’t do much to help Bush among the millions of Republicans who tuned in, especially in the early primary states. But make no mistake: His most important audience right now is the one that pushed him onto that stage in the first place.

Because if Bush has a natural base in the party, it’s the powerful assemblage of Washington Republicans — politicians, theorists, lobbyists and lawyers — who can be counted on to unify every four years around a known, governing candidate. That’s why he entered the race as the presumed favorite despite an eight-year absence from office. That’s why his Super-PAC rolled up more money than the cash-counters at Trump Taj Mahal.




To the capital crowd, Bush’s attributes were always clear. He had a solid record as a big-state, conservative governor. (Has he mentioned lately that he cut taxes by $19 billion?) He had a Latino wife and kids and spoke Spanish fluently — no small thing in a party that’s running out of non-white constituencies to offend. He was a reform Republican, an intellectual who could get right up in the grill of Democrats when it came to education or climate change.

Also, he had that last name. Sure, it was a little tarnished, but no Republican without it has won the presidency since 1984. Think about that.

But the past several weeks have really shaken governing Republicans. It’s not so much the staggering rise of Trump that has them on the verge of panic, although they talk about his potential nomination in apocalyptic terms, as if they imagine themselves, in some altered future, like Charlton Heston in that final scene from “Planet of the Apes,” wailing and beating their chests at the ruins of the Trump Monument on the Tidal Basin.

No, establishment Republicans remain pretty sanguine that Trump, for all his momentum, doesn’t have much room to grow beyond his 30 percent or so of the primary vote. For that, he’d probably have to become more of a statesman, which is like waiting for a turtle to grow feathers and fly.

What has Washington Republicans truly worried is Jeb’s precipitous decline. First there came the series of gaffes, from not being able to evade the most predictable trap — a question about whether he would have invaded Iraq like his brother — to defending the term “anchor babies,” which seemed all at once to erase his image as a thoughtful reformer on illegal immigration.

Then, after leading the nascent field for months, Bush’s poll numbers tumbled in dramatic fashion. Going into Wednesday’s debate, he’d fallen into fifth place in New Hampshire, a state he probably has to win, and into third place nationally, with less than 10 percent of the Republican vote.



Governing Republicans have been baffled at the way Bush decided to go after Trump in recent weeks — by trying to impeach his credentials as a conservative, when it’s obvious to everyone else on the planet that Trump’s appeal has nothing to do with ideology. They wonder why his Super-PAC waited until this week to start spending money on ads. They’re mystified that it took him until September to roll out a half-visionary policy proposal, on reforming the tax code, which he did little to promote.

Going into last night’s debate, longtime Republicans with whom I talked seemed to want two things from Bush. They wanted him to pivot away from his record in Florida — which no one much cares about, judging from the early success of candidates who have no record at all — and toward his vision for how he would actually govern.

And they wanted him to seize control of the debate by engaging Trump on policy. Enough about how Trump secretly loved Hillary Clinton or how he once gave money to Democrats; it was time to expose him as an entertainer who couldn’t hold his own when it came to foreign or domestic policy.

You can argue about whether these were the right strategies. But you can’t make the case that Bush did much of anything last night to reassure his critics on either count.
Bush and Trump went at it several times in the opening minutes of the debate, but Jeb went right back to his litany of Florida statistics, almost pleading with Trump at one point: “I have a proven record. I have a proven record.”

Inexplicably, he didn’t mention his own tax plan. Nor did he confront Trump on any policy details. Instead he complained, feebly, about Trump cutting him off.

“You’ve got more energy tonight. I like that,” Trump mockingly told Bush at one point.

Bush stiffly defended his wife, whom Trump had disparaged in a tweet. “To subject my wife into the middle of raucous political conversation was completely inappropriate,” Bush said, as if he were bringing a complaint before the grievance committee of the bar association.

Responding to Trump’s nonsensical suggestion that it was wrong to speak Spanish on the campaign trail, Bush began: “I’ve been speaking English here tonight, and I’ll keep speaking English.”

Glad we cleared that up.

You can just about hear the footsteps of ruling Republicans as they tiptoe away from Bush and start to rethink this whole thing. Parties, like nature, abhor a vacuum.

The question you hear now is: Who’s the fallback?

Chris Christie seems too damaged. Rand Paul seems too erratic. Scott Walker seems too much like Scott Walker.

To hear governing Republicans tell it, there are only two “nominate-able” candidates on the stage, aside from Bush. One is Marco Rubio, who has performed well in the debates, but who has yet to find a compelling theme or a foothold in New Hampshire, where the establishment figures it will have to stop Trump or whomever emerges from the purity test in Iowa.

The other is John Kasich. And he’s the guy Bush’s ought to be worried about.

It was Kasich, and not Bush, who scolded the debate moderator, CNN’s Jake Tapper, early in the debate for not focusing on policy. It was Kasich who forced himself into the foreign policy debate from the edge of the stage a few minutes later, refusing to be silenced. It was Kasich who dared to make a spirited defense of globalism, vowing to rebuild foreign alliances.

Fiorina had the flashier moments and the best night. But Kasich did exactly what he had to do: He came off as a strong, capable alternative for party loyalists considering a change of direction.

Washington Republicans remember Kasich well from his years in Congress. They remember him, in a lot of cases, as impetuous and immature.

But now he’s the most successful sitting governor in the field, and he has already surged into double digits in New Hampshire. So far, at least, he has managed to project Midwestern sobriety and a comfort with himself.

And establishment Republicans are already whispering not so quietly about the potential of a Kasich-Rubio ticket, if that’s what it takes to dispatch both Trump and Clinton.

Now, you might reasonably ask: So what? Who needs an establishment these days, anyway? If the party had any power, there wouldn’t be 17 candidates to begin with.

True enough. But the consensus of the establishment can still matter, at least as far as we know, when it comes to raising money and stitching together state organizations in the critical months before the voting begins. Key endorsements in Washington still send a powerful signal to Republican influencers in the states.

It’s not an accident that Republicans nominated George W. Bush, John McCain and Mitt Romney in its last three competitive contests — all of them establishment picks.

By the end of the year, someone will have emerged as the anti-Trump or anti-Carson in the field, the candidate who makes the establishment case that experience and electability are assets, rather than evils, when it comes to wining back the White House.

That candidate could still be Jeb Bush. He’s got time to steady himself, and plenty of cash.

But opportunity knocks for Ohio’s governor. And last night, once again, Bush left the door wide open.


source

0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:59 am
@revelette2,
That debate was an abomination...for the Republican Party; for the candidates; for the media...

...and, unfortunately, for the people of these United States.

An abomination!
 

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