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Who do you think is the most memorable movie character ever and why?

 
 
Charlie Concord
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2015 08:37 pm
@edgarblythe,
I love that movie. Jack put it over the top.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2015 11:03 pm
Then there's Norman Bates.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2015 11:05 pm
@glitterbag,
There are several great characters in Dr Strangelove.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2015 11:06 pm
Rocky Balboa in the original Rocky.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 04:52 am
@edgarblythe,
This thread is like an applied Meyers Briggs test looking for a CEO or a general . So far weve got Georgeob, who actually made a decision . Everyone else is kind a lost in wanting more and more external input before making a decision. Fascinating.

I used to use MB dynamics to assess technical teams and see whether they could eventually get anywhere or would they become a committee good for assessing options without ever getting anywhere.
I used to kid these groups that, "decision making is a very particular skill> Its not the result of being the best and brightest necessarily . It is the tool of the risk taker and leader who is accountable.
Many groupd gropes like this thread are like a burning building where someone has to lead the others out.
Sorry, but I find these group dynamics very telling and entertaining.
BTW, Im right there with you, I picked two "MOST " memorable characters. Remember, in MB dynamics, there "is no right answer" its all just a tool that enables us to evaluate how the group works and how individuals operate within the group.

Course, MB could be all wet too. Hows that for my inability to decide?

edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 06:57 am
Fact is, there is no best. Too many are great in their own right.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 12:37 pm
@farmerman,
Im going to argue with you a little on Meyers Briggs. It does identify how people arrive at decisions, but shouldn't be used as a disqualifier. My husband took the test first and came home very excited because after getting his 4 letters, he found me on the spread sheet (well my 4 letters) and it explained a lot when it came to our outlooks and preferences. Although I split between E and I, the others were strong NTP. Introvert and extrovert aren't used the same way on a MB scale as they are socially. For instance, a strong T doesn't indicate a person without feelings. I found MB a useful tool, but I would never use it to construct a workforce or working group. I just view it as another tool in the toolbox.

When it comes to picking the most memorable movie character ever, that seems like trying to pick the best wine ever. Too many to choose from, and entirely dependent on your age and number of movies you have seen. When I was 18, I thought Easy Rider was the epitome of film making. I no longer think thats true.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 01:00 pm
@glitterbag,
Yes, Meyers-Briggs is more about helping to identify working styles and comfort zones of individuals than it is a tool to be rigidly interpreted or restrict staffs or selection of members for working groups or committees.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 01:03 pm
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:

When I was 18, I thought Easy Rider was the epitome of film making. I no longer think thats true.

Especially find that true when considering the trends of movie making and directors where the movie styles change so often. This same stylistic dynamic and changes can be said about the successful movies like Midnight Cowboy, Rosemary's Baby and Bonnie and Clyde.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 01:07 pm
@Ragman,
I watched Midnight Cowboy again recently, and for me it still holds up, has the same impact.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 01:11 pm
@edgarblythe,
Yes, interestingly the movie still has impact. But the style of movie-making has changed...hardly for the better, I might add.
0 Replies
 
motorace
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Jun, 2015 11:59 pm
@Charlie Concord,
Ferris Bueller in Ferris Bueller's day off - for being able to be so persuasive and to live life with ease, comfort and style through his wits. I never tire of watching it.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 12:09 am
@motorace,
Ferris Buellers day off is a must see flick.
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 06:19 am
The autistic savant, Raymond Babbitt, in Rain Man (portrayed by Dustin Hoffman).
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 08:34 pm
@firefly,
Gloria Swanson in Sunset Blvd. It could be caricature in someone else hands, but Gloria was perfection. A great actress is a great actress

Oh and Lillian Gish in Night of the Hunter, hands down one of the most frightening films I've ever seen. She was more than enough force for Robert Mitchem's character. It's rawness is chilling.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 08:57 pm
Also, Elizabeth Taylor and Sandy Dennis in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 10:22 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

Also, Elizabeth Taylor and Sandy Dennis in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?


I saw that movie about 5 months ago, I liked it better after some years had passed.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Jun, 2015 10:34 pm
@glitterbag,
I saw it in one of the tiny theaters they had, in Kansas City, in 1969, and then again a few years ago. Strong stuff, but I enjoyed all of the actors.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 12:09 am
Nick and Nora Charles in The Thin Man series. And let's not forget Asta.
0 Replies
 
Charlie Concord
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jun, 2015 10:03 pm
@glitterbag,
The art museum scene is one of the best scenes ever, in my opinion. It is a nice commentary on how individuals can learn by simply getting out and experiencing life.
 

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