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What is the adjective of this behavior? (vocabulary)

 
 
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 05:16 am
I once knew an adjective word for a person who likes to monopolize something only for himself/herself that is meant for share, but now I can't remember that one word. The word seems like egoistic or individualistic, but it's more specific than that.
For example, in an office there is free facility or equipment ( like iPad, telephone, car, or photocopy machine) for employee use. But somehow, one individual always manages to occupy such facility only for himself/herself and seemingly keeps that thing to his/her possession, causing others difficult to use it. If there is a new offer for shared facility, she/he always jumps first to take the chance. What is the precise English adjective for this attitude?
Thanks in advance.

Stella.
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Type: Question • Score: 9 • Views: 1,410 • Replies: 35

 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 05:28 am
@stellabel,
It might be narcissist. This is a person who tends to only think about himself or his own needs.
stellabel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 06:06 am
@Ragman,
Hi, Thanks for your answer. I'm sure narcissist can cover that kind of behavior, but it's not a specific word to describe it.
Maybe you have another word to define someone who likes to keep things in his/her possession? It's like a mix between selfish + stingy + possessive.

I'm not an English native and I hate when I skipped noting a new word and forget it. Thanks anyway.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 06:13 am
@stellabel,
Miserly?
Greedy?

Is it on this page?....
http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/greedy
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 06:26 am
@stellabel,
controlling
control freak
possessive.

I'd use the thesaurus link that Lordy provided. Thesaurus are where you go when you need a synonym.
stellabel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 06:38 am
@Ragman,
Not those words. yes, I have looked up that website, freedictionary, thesaurus, and other online search that provides synonym, but I couldn't find the word. That's why I posted in this forum. Thanks for the help anyway.
0 Replies
 
stellabel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 06:50 am
@Lordyaswas,
I appreciate the suggestion. I've looked up the list and couldn't find the word I'm looking for.
What other adjective do you use to describe a person who firstly takes a mineral bottle or blanket only for himself/herself during emergency situation, or a person who firstly tags everything as his/hers. It's another word of selfish.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 07:00 am
@stellabel,
Avaricious?
Covetous?
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 07:11 am
@stellabel,
If all of the dictionary, thesaurus sites, various online resources plus all of these suggestions made here hasn't yielded the answer, perhaps you're looking for a word that doesn't exist?

The behavior you describe is a narcissistic behavior.
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 07:12 am
@Ragman,
Then we should make one up, like my old Nan used to do.

Snaffulistic?
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 07:16 am
@Lordyaswas,
Regulonanism?
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 07:18 am
@Ragman,
Banker?
0 Replies
 
TheSubliminalKid
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 07:34 am
@stellabel,
Arrogative?
Lordyaswas
 
  3  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 07:40 am
@TheSubliminalKid,
If you're right I shall throw my orange peel at you and go off in a huff.
TheSubliminalKid
 
  0  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 07:47 am
@Lordyaswas,
It wasn't easy, I had to fanny about on dictionary sites for ages before I hit on it.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 08:12 am
@stellabel,
Coemptive?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 08:15 am
@TheSubliminalKid,
Interestingly the noun "arrogation" is an old and medieval legal term: it's originally an archaic 'institutum' in Roman Law, when a free person becomes a member of a different family as a relative. In Medieval times, it was a different kind of adoption.

Quote:
He [Frederick I, Elector Palatine] ruled the Electoral Palatinate after the death of his brother Louis IV as regent for his nephew Philip, Elector Palatine. He adopted his nephew in 1451 and refused to marry. From this "Arrogation," he claimed the right to be the legitimate elector.
Source
stellabel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 08:16 am
@Lordyaswas,
Sorry, neither of those.
0 Replies
 
stellabel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 08:18 am
@Ragman,
It exists. I got the word from Royal Pains series. The word is addressed to Evan by other character. The thing is, I forgot which scene and in which episode. I've re-watched and couldn't find it. I'm sure I wasn't dreaming Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 08:20 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Don't you start!

It's bad enough with submarinerkid coming in here, giving it all that.

Raggie and I have been slaving away over a hot thesaurus and nothing.

Life ain't fair sometimes.
0 Replies
 
 

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