49
   

Turning The Ballot Box Against Republicans

 
 
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Aug, 2022 04:44 pm

Texas man sentenced to 25 years in prison for assaulting Asian family
he blamed for the pandemic

(cnn)
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 01:10 pm
@Region Philbis,
Wow. What he did was terrible and horrifying, to be sure, but 25 years? Your judges hand down so many extreme sentences.
BillW
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 01:17 pm
@Mame,
It was in Texas and the assailants name is Gomez, possible Mexican. Go figure!

It was also federal hate crimes.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 01:23 pm
@BillW,
Sometimes I wish we had stronger sentences but most times I don't. On Youtube there are videos of teens being given life sentences. What's to live for?
BillW
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 01:30 pm
@Mame,
Yes, cruel and unusual punishment. I have always believed the death penalty is less cruel.
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 01:59 pm
@Mame,
Quote:
25 years? Your judges hand down so many extreme sentences.
from the CNN article --

Gomez grabbed kitchen knives that were being sold at the store and attacked the family,
slashing the father and a child who was then 6 years old, according to the criminal complaint.

Prosecutors said Thursday the blade of the knife entered millimeters from the child's right eye,
cut his ear and slashed the back of the child's head
.

A store employee who intervened was also stabbed in the leg...
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 02:12 pm
@BillW,
BillW wrote:

Yes, cruel and unusual punishment. I have always believed the death penalty is less cruel.


It most assuredly IS.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 02:15 pm
@Region Philbis,
I read the article. Just think how long 25 years is, though. Maybe he's mentally unwell?
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 02:22 pm
@Mame,

he's a menace to society.

perhaps he would have gotten fewer years if the crime had occurred in a more liberal state than Texas...
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 08:05 pm
@Frank Apisa,
It's why I call mandatory life sentences "chickenshit death penalties".

Sentences much over twenty years are mostly death sentences.

When I was a young teen, my dad gave a 'no show' job to an ex-Purple Gang member who had been released from the original Ohio State Penitentiary after a twenty-year stretch for manslaughter. Very scary guy.

Most of those guys checked out with a bad ticker in an SRO by 65.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2022 08:15 pm
@Region Philbis,
A couple of things: crime has been going down for the last 30 yrs, THO gun crime has started to rise. Some say the pandemic and four years of the Orange Shitgibbon has had some part in that.

At the same time police solve a little more than 30% of murders.

The first Freakanomics book argued that the reduction in the crime rate corresponds with legal abortion. If they're right (and their argument is compelling) banning abortion will raise crime rates as the kids that RWers tend to ignore after birth become the new wave of criminals.

Laws of unintended consequences.

Anecdotes AND statistics.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2022 07:34 am
@Mame,
Punishment as a reaction to a violation of the law is the last resort under the rule of law (so-called ultima ratio).

In German criminal law, the purpose of sentencing is to ensure that the punishment is proportionate to guilt.

In doing so, various principles (set out in the law) must be taken into account (e.g. the effects of the punishment on the future lifestyle of the offender).

There are always different opinions about the sentence - especially from those who have not read or understood the reasoning.


Interesting opinion in today's WP:
In both Russia and America, punishment does not always fit the crime
Quote:
[...]
In our culture, it’s not uncommon to look unfavorably on rule-breakers and say they should have known better. Many of us grew up with parents who favored the “hot stove” theory of education: You warn a child that the stove is hot, so they learn not to touch it. Often, the child touches the stove anyway. That’s the education part. Then you tell the child, “I told you so.” Burned fingers are the physical manifestation of what comes from not listening.

But there is something pernicious hidden in this lesson. Something we don’t like to admit or say out loud. And that is the concurrent belief that those who don’t listen to our warnings deserve whatever punishment they receive. It gives us a brief sensation of moral superiority to say, “Well, what did you expect?” Or, “I told you so.” We imagine the pain that others endure for ignoring our warnings is warranted, even reasonable.

We do this often in our own country. We hand down outsize punishments that really aren’t much about the crimes themselves but are mostly penalties for breaking the rules. We don’t hate crime nearly half as much as we love punishment. We are fanatically dedicated to upholding the rules even when the rules themselves — and the people who make them — are suspect. And we hand out sentences that speak to the vast distance between those who have no trouble following the rules and those whose lives that are harder, meaner, scrappier. We cling to “I told you so” because it helps one group maintain that distance.

But this kind of thinking is unproductive and often just cruel. And we can be just as ruthless as the Russians when it comes to the price we make people pay for not following the rules.

We must resist this kind of thinking because it is, at some level, vindictive. It is objectively wrong to punish two people for what amounts to a victimless crime. It’s an imaginary moral victory that provides comfort to no one. It might work on children, perhaps once or twice. But mostly, it just makes us feel better about ourselves.

Our government should work to bring both Griner and Fogel home. I know it will take weeks, if not months. I know we will probably have to trade some truly rotten bad guys away to get them back. And I know it will consume the time of a lot of people. But I know it will probably happen eventually and, when it does, it will be something we can feel good about.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  3  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2022 09:55 am
A lot of these crimes are committed by mentally unhinged/unwell people and may even be the child of another mentally ill person. The biggest mistake we made was in deconstructing facilities for the mentally ill. There, people got their medication, shelter, food, some kind of treatment, and society was safer.
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2022 10:04 am
@Mame,
Mame wrote:

A lot of these crimes are committed by mentally unhinged/unwell people and may even be the child of another mentally ill person. The biggest mistake we made was in deconstructing facilities for the mentally ill. There, people got their medication, shelter, food, some kind of treatment, and society was safer.


AMEN!
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Aug, 2022 02:32 pm

https://iili.io/UOzjXS.jpg
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Aug, 2022 02:44 pm

Trump-backed GOP candidate for MI AG under criminal investigation
for possibly tampering with voting machines

(cnn)
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  5  
Reply Mon 8 Aug, 2022 05:22 pm

https://iili.io/UOlYfR.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

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