4
   

Forgiveness and Lies

 
 
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 07:31 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I was referring to interpersonal relationships since that was the request of the OP.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 07:33 am
@Germlat,
Germlat wrote:
I was referring to interpersonal relationships
since that was the request of the OP.
Is there a distinction in principle???????
I don t see one.
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 07:50 am
@OmSigDAVID,
The principle difference is there's a difference between society placing a vote of confidence on a politician versus my individual choice. I may or may not have helped in placing that individual in a position of power. In an interpersonal relationship power (at least amongst adults) is shared.
0 Replies
 
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 09:08 am
@James Lewis,
If someone betrays you and lies about it...forgiveness for many also depends on how honest you perceive the person to be. Are they sorry they got caught or are they truly remorseful . The difference is wether a person can come forward without being forced to acknowledge something by providing full proof.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 09:44 am
@Germlat,
I can remember loving a chick un-conditionally.
Any forgiveness is spontaneous n reflexive.





David
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 10:38 am
@Germlat,
That's true, because it happened to our two sons. The older son was always dependable and could be depended upon about honesty. When he went to college, I gave him a credit card and told him to buy his books and treat himself to meals at restaurants once-in-a-while. Since I believed in treating our sons equally, I did that for our younger son. He charged $6,500 in one month to buy into some business. I demanded he return the credit card, and I cut it up into pieces. He lied about what the money was for, but I have forgiven him for it a long time ago. My wife said I should have known better with the younger son, because money always burned a hole in his pocket.

How does a father not forgive his own son?
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 12:31 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Yes...but did you ever trust him with your credit card again? Forgiveness and trust are two separate issues. You can continue to love someone, forgive them and still not trust them...sometimes people can change and earn trust back. Usually by exhibiting behaviors that indicate change and admitting what they've done.
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 12:42 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Again forgiveness and trust are separate.
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 01:05 pm
@Germlat,
Closeness matters. For example, if a business partner betrays you...it is possible to forgive...but--would you still trust him your business affairs. Maybe, but in a very controlled fashion in which you still hold power.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2014 05:16 pm
@Germlat,
Germlat wrote:
Again forgiveness and trust are separate.
U bring out a good point.

For instance: suppose that a heroin addict was caught
stealing someone's property. Its possible that the victim
can forgive the thief, if he feels like being magnanimous,
but he 'd be stupid to believe that the junky
woud not continue stealing from him or from anyone to fund his habit.
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Aug, 2014 05:10 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I believe in being charitable and generous, but withholding retribution is sometimes the last thing a person needs. Retribution can come in many forms. Holding a person accountable can teach a valuable life lesson. It could even be a wake-up call.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Aug, 2014 05:47 am
@Germlat,
Germlat wrote:
I believe in being charitable and generous,
That can be fun sometimes.
Did u c my incident that I reported in the Elliot Rodger thread?
I enjoyed that. It was fun. In the Closing Circle, I told of it
in hope of generating generosity n friendliness.
My advice was well received.
I don t always do it, but sometimes,
I get hit in the head with an idea.


Germlat wrote:
but withholding retribution is sometimes the last thing a person needs.
Retribution can come in many forms.
It can.



Germlat wrote:
Holding a person accountable can teach a valuable life lesson.
It could even be a wake-up call.
Yea. (Sometimes, I used to go back to sleep.)


U did not fill out your profile; do u feel like telling us
about yourself? What u like n dislike, what u want? Background ?





David
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Aug, 2014 06:36 am
@OmSigDAVID,
This is the first forum in which I've participated ( never had much leisure time before). I'll have to go back and fill some of that in. I have disclosed a good bit about myself through my posts...
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Aug, 2014 09:42 am
@Germlat,
I am sure that I have seen some of them.

U can click on your name,
to get to your home page.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Aug, 2014 10:53 am
Quote:
Cicerone said re younger son: I demanded he return the credit card, and I cut it up into pieces. He lied about what the money was for

Judge Judy said on her show-
"How do you know when a teenager is lying? Answer- whenever they open their mouth!"
0 Replies
 
 

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