17
   

During The American Revolutionary War, the state religion of Great Britain was Christianity?

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 09:39 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

The German word refers to the spirit of the times,
tho not necessarily to the place; perhaps that is implied;
i.e., the spirit of the times in one place,
as distinct from somewhere else.
No. Not the German word.
The German word means how people generally feel and think (the "mentality") during a certain period, the conceptual and cultural environment of a period of time. (Herder created this word and wrote about on 190 pages in his "Genius seculi" in 1760.)

The term "Zeitgeist" is negatively connoted, even in English: The Zeitgeist is a most dismal animal and I wish to heaven one could escape its clutches. (Aldous Huxley, 1933)
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 09:55 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:


The term "Zeitgeist" is negatively connoted.


Like the word propaganda, which tends to be negative? Does "Zeitgeist" have something to do with Hitler as well?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 10:30 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
Like the word propaganda, which tends to be negative? Does "Zeitgeist" have something to do with Hitler as well?
Hiteler didn't live in the 18th century.
"Propaganda" is of Latin origin ("propagare") and only very late got this "negative touch". (The Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples's original name is Congregatione de propaganda fide .)

0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 10:51 am
@oristarA,

Walter Hinteler wrote:
The term "Zeitgeist" is negatively connoted.
oristarA wrote:

Like the word propaganda, which tends to be negative?
Does "Zeitgeist" have something to do with Hitler as well?
The 3rd Reich had its own, perhaps unique, zeitgeist.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:03 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
The 3rd Reich had its own, perhaps unique, zeitgeist.
There are quite a few publications about the Zeitgeist and philosophy during the Nazi period ...
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:07 am
@Walter Hinteler,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

The German word refers to the spirit of the times,
tho not necessarily to the place; perhaps that is implied;
i.e., the spirit of the times in one place,
as distinct from somewhere else.
Walter Hinteler wrote:
No. Not the German word.
The German word means how people generally feel and think (the "mentality")
during a certain period, the conceptual and cultural environment of a period of time.
(Herder created this word and wrote about on 190 pages in his "Genius seculi" in 1760.)
I fail to see
how that is distinct in principle
from what I offered. By saying: the spirit of the times,
I meant the mentality of the times,
the pervasive, ubiquitous, endemic opinions of the populace
.



Walter Hinteler wrote:

The term "Zeitgeist" is negatively connoted, even in English:
The Zeitgeist is a most dismal animal and I wish to heaven
one could escape its clutches.
(Aldous Huxley, 1933)
Heaven shud be Capitalized.
It is a proper noun, like Cleveland, Vienna or Denver, Colorado.

Maybe Huxley disfavored some particular unique zeitgeist,
rather than the concept of it??





David
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:11 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

OmSigDAVID wrote:
The 3rd Reich had its own, perhaps unique, zeitgeist.
There are quite a few publications about the Zeitgeist
and philosophy during the Nazi period ...
Yes, I 'm sure that their Leader was very interested in that.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:12 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
I fail to see
how that is distinct in principle
from what I offered.

Perhaps your better in understanding German than I do.


Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:13 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

The term "Zeitgeist" is negatively connoted, even in English:
The Zeitgeist is a most dismal animal and I wish to heaven
one could escape its clutches.
(Aldous Huxley, 1933)
Heaven shud be Capitalized.
[/quote]I quoted and don't change original quotes.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:15 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Maybe Huxley disfavored some particular unique zeitgeist,
rather than the concept of it??
Perhaps his understanding of the German term was different to yours? Perhaps he had read Herder (because he referred to him)?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:15 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Yes, I 'm sure that their Leader was very interested in that.
???
Do you have any source(s) that Hitler made comments about Herder or Zeitgeist in general???
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:21 am
@Walter Hinteler,
No, but I 'm pretty sure that he cared
what his populace thought.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:24 am
@Walter Hinteler,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Maybe Huxley disfavored some particular unique zeitgeist,
rather than the concept of it??
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Perhaps his understanding of the German term was different to yours?
Perhaps he had read Herder (because he referred to him)?
U believe that he was of the vu
that NO times shud have any spirit?? any widely held beliefs ?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:26 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
U believe that he was of the vu
that NO times shud have any spirit?? any widely held beliefs ?
I have no idea. And I didn't respond to this but to "Zeitgeist". The German term "Zeitgeist".
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:27 am
@Walter Hinteler,

OmSigDAVID wrote:
I fail to see
how that is distinct in principle
from what I offered.
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Perhaps your better in understanding German than I do.
Ouch!!
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 11:40 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Zeitgeist today and especially in American English might have a different mena to the German word "Zeitgeist".
Herder translated a very popular book title of his time, "Genius Saeculi" to the new German word "Zeitgeist".
His owb definition of Zeitgeist was herrschenden Meinungen, Sitten und Gewohnheiten einer Zeit (1793) - "prevailing opinions, customs and habits of a time".
That's why we only speak of a Zeitgeist retrospectively.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 12:08 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

OmSigDAVID wrote:
I fail to see
how that is distinct in principle
from what I offered.

Perhaps your better in understanding German than I do.



What? Aren't you German? Do you really want to relinquish your advantage of the language before David?
It sounds you're not joking and self-effacing.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 12:18 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

U believe that he was of the vu
that NO times shud have any spirit?? any widely held beliefs ?


If I were a lawyer, I would refuse to recognize U as you. And what is vu? I have no idea.

To narrate an event you sound like a well-educated gentleman; and all of a sudden, your unique spellings look like a teenage trying to be cool. But it is not cool, he just acts like a hick.

Any accurate expression needs strict spellings. I read articles from Nature, Science, Hawking and Dawkins and often were impressed by their accuracy and intelligence. Your teenagelike spellings seriously damage your wise image, Dave.
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 12:19 pm
@oristarA,
OK, Oristar. There is not much for me to adjust.
For the most part, it is ALREADY grammatically correct.
Note that I offer NO comments upon substantive content,
only concerning ideal use of syntax & grammar.

David



George wrote:

We cannot very well use the second, can we?
We are talking about a country, not "the country".
They are not the same thing.

oristarA wrote:

That is, after you've listed both definitions, you still cannot decide which one you will use?

NO ONE has ever listed two definitions to explain the meaning of a word in a sentence.

Your behavior can only have proven that there is confusion in your mind about the meaning of a country.
Therefore, you have to keep prevaricating.

It doesn't matter that you don't know the meaning of a word, but if you've determined and/or propagandized that this word should have some quality or not have some quality, it matters! That is so because such behavior points to the fact that either you've made a mistake or you are not sincere.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 12:26 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Thanks.

It looks like a narrative by a lawyer with his undeniable accuracy. Razz

Adding " That is so" before "because" sounds very formal to me.
0 Replies
 
 

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