glitterbag
 
  5  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2013 08:05 pm
@glitterbag,
I do know, that more than a few pea brained fascists and racist idiots feel comfortable posting behind the anonymity of the Internet to say despicable things about, of all people, Nelson Mandela.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2013 08:22 pm
@glitterbag,
You Do Not Argue With Nelson Mandela: Lessons on Business and Context in South Africa c. 1994

by Bhaskar Chakravorti

Quote:
Turns out, my case wasn't as rock solid as I had imagined. A senior minister took me aside the next day and asked if we could scrap the plans for a ring around Africa and just do a single cable that linked South Africa to .... Malaysia. That's it. Just Malaysia. But that makes no business sense whatsoever, I protested. The minister explained that Mandela had visited Malaysia the previous year and had struck up a close friendship with Prime Minister Mahathir. The two had agreed on cooperation on many fronts. Most significantly, Malaysia had pledged help in providing voter education to South Africa, a country where nearly 18 million out of the 20 million citizens would cast their ballots for the first time, with half of the 18 million illiterate. And now, post-election, it was critical that the bonds be strengthened further.

"But consider the economics," I continued. "A single link to Malaysia would be frightfully expensive and would not have the traffic to justify it. You would forgo the chance to connect with the rest of Africa."

The minister politely, but firmly, let me know that while I seemed smart enough, I was not as clever as I thought I was. "You do not argue with Nelson Mandela," he said.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bhaskar-chakravorti/you-do-not-argue-with-nel_b_4428489.html

this here is a great man
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  4  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2013 09:33 pm
@glitterbag,
I can tell an asshole commented after my last post, however since that deviant is on my ignore list, I don't have to see his deranged post. I love the ignore button.

Sorry bud, you'll have to type louder, life is good.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2013 01:43 am
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:
I don't know how many people could serve 27 years in prison, return to society and then work to try and make his country a better place for all people.

Exactly.
0 Replies
 
Below viewing threshold (view)
glitterbag
 
  4  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2013 04:53 am
@Romeo Fabulini,
You are loathsome.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  4  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2013 09:41 am
@Romeo Fabulini,
You are as welcome as a festering boil.
Below viewing threshold (view)
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 01:26 pm
The World should benefit by the example Mandela set. He endured 27 years in prison, but did not come out as a destructive hardened criminal. Instead he devoted the remainder of his life for harmony and peace.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 01:34 pm
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:

The World should benefit by the example Mandela set. He endured 27 years in prison, but did not come out as a destructive hardened criminal. Instead he devoted the remainder of his life for harmony and peace.
after he had gotten what he wanted by embracing violence he turned into a peacemaker.....those who have already won can afford to be benevolent.
hingehead
 
  4  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 01:43 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
after he had gotten what he wanted by embracing violence he turned into a peacemaker.....those who have already won can afford to be benevolent


What? He wanted multiple decades in prison? And from that position of victory he could afford to be benevolent?

Do you even listen to yourself any more?
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 04:22 pm
@glitterbag,
What? One insult wasn't enough?

He's got your button pushed.
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Dec, 2013 04:21 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Sorry Finn, no need to get jealous. I'm not playing favorites.
hingehead
 
  3  
Reply Thu 19 Dec, 2013 05:56 pm
The Guardian had a beautiful anecdote in Mandela's Obit and then sums up what Mandela did for his nation - in spite of the curmudgeonly isolationist views a couple have vomited up here.

Quote:
So why use the word great? Perhaps it was Mandela's appreciation of politics as theatre, combined with his talent as the great conciliator. Many will have their own stories of the "Madiba magic" at work. For this writer, it was a small episode that took place on the steps of the civic centre, under a fluttering flag of the Boer republic, in a dusty village in the middle of the giant scrubland known as the Karoo. The date was 15 August 1995.

The place was Orania, Northern Cape, the last refuge of the Afrikaner fundamentalists who fled the approach of modernity with the great trek of 1835-42. The occasion was a tea party. Mandela was the guest, the host was Betsy Verwoerd, the 94-year-old widow of the notorious President Hendrik Verwoerd, whose killing in 1966 had brought no pleasure to his opponents imprisoned on Robben Island – in Long Walk to Freedom, Mandela asserted that neither he nor the ANC had ever supported political assassination. One moment of that extraordinary meeting stands out for me, overwhelming all the other extraordinary events of post-apartheid South Africa.

It came as Betsy, bereft of her glasses, struggled to read a statement to reporters gathered on the steps of the community hall. Mandela, sotto voce, prompted her in Afrikaans, reading over her shoulder. Once finished, she smiled her thanks up at the black man towering over her. He smiled fondly back.

To appreciate that moment, one needs a particular understanding of the South African story. To the world, South Africa has long been literally a black-and-white issue, the goodies and baddies easily identifiable by the colour of their skin. But that was always an over-simplification, qualified from the early days of the anti-apartheid struggle by the likes of Fischer, the Rev Beyers Naudé and Slovo, and compromised more recently by the reform movement under De Klerk, who saw the necessity of letting Mandela take the country forward in the election of 1994.

Another way of understanding South Africa is to recognise it as something of an Old Testament story, a tale of people struggling to do right by their gods and failing time and time again. In the second half of the 20th century, these people, exhausted by the struggle with themselves and against one another, had need of a unifying figure to give them a vision of nationhood.

Mandela saw the need, donned the mask that the role demanded and gave his life for his people. There lies his greatness, and hence the tears that flow at his death, in a much beloved country.

• Rolihlahla Nelson Mandela, statesman, born 18 July 1918; died 5 December 2013
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Thu 19 Dec, 2013 10:51 pm
@hingehead,
hingehead wrote:

The Guardian had a beautiful anecdote in Mandela's Obit and then sums up what Mandela did for his nation - in spite of the curmudgeonly isolationist views a couple have vomited up here.

Quote:
So why use the word great? Perhaps it was Mandela's appreciation of politics as theatre, combined with his talent as the great conciliator. Many will have their own stories of the "Madiba magic" at work. For this writer, it was a small episode that took place on the steps of the civic centre, under a fluttering flag of the Boer republic, in a dusty village in the middle of the giant scrubland known as the Karoo. The date was 15 August 1995.

The place was Orania, Northern Cape, the last refuge of the Afrikaner
fundamentalists who fled the approach of modernity with the great trek of 1835-42. The occasion was a tea party. Mandela was the guest, the host was Betsy Verwoerd, the 94-year-old widow of the notorious President Hendrik Verwoerd, whose killing in 1966 had brought no pleasure to his opponents imprisoned on Robben Island – in Long Walk to Freedom, Mandela asserted that neither he nor the ANC had ever supported political assassination. One moment of that extraordinary meeting stands out for me, overwhelming all the other extraordinary events of post-apartheid South Africa.

It came as Betsy, bereft of her glasses, struggled to read a statement to reporters gathered on the steps of the community hall. Mandela, sotto voce, prompted her in Afrikaans, reading over her shoulder. Once finished, she smiled her thanks up at the black man towering over her. He smiled fondly back.

To appreciate that moment, one needs a particular understanding of the South African story. To the world, South Africa has long been literally a black-and-white issue, the goodies and baddies easily identifiable by the colour of their skin. But that was always an over-simplification, qualified from the early days of the anti-apartheid struggle by the likes of Fischer, the Rev Beyers Naudé and Slovo, and compromised more recently by the reform movement under De Klerk, who saw the necessity of letting Mandela take the country forward in the election of 1994.

Another way of understanding South Africa is to recognise it as something of an Old Testament story, a tale of people struggling to do right by their gods and failing time and time again. In the second half of the 20th century, these people, exhausted by the struggle with themselves and against one another, had need of a unifying figure to give them a vision of nationhood.

Mandela saw the need, donned the mask that the role demanded and gave his life for his people. There lies his greatness, and hence the tears that flow at his death, in a much beloved country.

• Rolihlahla Nelson Mandela, statesman, born 18 July 1918; died 5 December 2013



Hinge, thank you for capturing a moment in time for us. I know there a bunch of folks who refuse to give Gandi, Mandela, Dr. Martin Luther King, and many other visionaries who hoped for a better life for the entire globe. I hope it happens, but I don't hold out much hope, but I refuse to give up hope altogether. If I don't run in to you before the 25th, enjoy the day and lets all hope for a remarkable 2014. Happy New Year Idea
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  0  
Reply Thu 19 Dec, 2013 11:20 pm
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:

Sorry Finn, no need to get jealous. I'm not playing favorites.


Believe me, I never thought that someone you think is a loathsome, festering boil was one of your favorites.

BTW, what do you call really bad actors?
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Dec, 2013 01:14 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

glitterbag wrote:

Sorry Finn, no need to get jealous. I'm not playing favorites.


Believe me, I never thought that someone you think is a loathsome, festering boil was one of your favorites.

BTW, what do you call really bad actors?


Even more sorry Mr. Finn, I don't understand your last comment. It's probably not worth your time to respond, because I'm here honoring Nelson Mandela's body of work. Sorry again, I don't submit articles to Access Hollywood, and I sure as hell don't watch it.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 21 Dec, 2013 12:41 am
@glitterbag,
Bad Actor = Bad Guy
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Dec, 2013 02:07 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn, I understand you are humorless, and believe it is your solemn responsibility to point out all the blemishes you assume others have not noticed or stupidly ignore. Who conferred that responsibility to you? Where's your special badge and decoder ring?

I knew what you meant asking about "bad actor", but mistakenly thought you would be bright enough to realize you were being brushed off. I choose not to allow you to involve me in your attempt to hijack a thread about the passing of Mandela into a wizzing contest between us. Now, why don't you go busy yourself PM'ing other members to chastise me. There's a good boy.

So, in the meantime, He who is without sin, etc.
FOUND SOUL
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Dec, 2013 02:29 pm
@glitterbag,
. "In my country we go to PRISON first. and then become President." -Nelson Mandela.

Quote:
For to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.



Quote:
We must use time wisely and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right.



Quote:
If there are dreams about a beautiful South Africa, there are also roads that lead to their goal. Two of these roads could be named Goodness and Forgiveness.

 

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