2
   

Since we're on the subject of Scotland...

 
 
Reply Mon 5 Apr, 2004 10:36 pm
Those of you with Scots' ancestry should appreciate hearing (though many of you know) that tomorrow, April 6th, is Tartan Day. Now many of you have probably not heard of this holiday-- probably because it's a very new holiday, designated by the Scottish Parliament.

Here's what I found on a website:

Woodrow Wilson said of the Scots, "Every line of strength in American history is a line coloured with Scottish blood." The contribution of the immigrant Scots upon North America is massive and these people have remained proud of their heritage.

Numerous groups and societies throughout Canada and America have taken the anniversary of the Declaration of Arbroath (1320) as their national date to celebrate their Scottish roots.

On December 19th 1991, in response to action initiated by the Clans & Scottish Societies of Canada, the Ontario Legislature passed a resolution proclaiming April 6th as Tartan Day, following the example of other Canadian provinces.


America followed suit on March 20th 1998, when Senate Resolution 155 (S.Res. 155), proposed by US Senate Republican majority leader Trent Lott, was passed unanimously.

The resolution, with its preamble, is as follows:

S. Res. 155

Whereas April 6 has a special significance for all Americans, and especially those Americans of Scottish descent, because the Declaration of Arbroath, the Scottish Declaration of Independence, was signed on April 6, 1320 and the American Declaration of Independence was modelled on that inspirational document;

Whereas this resolution honors the major role that Scottish Americans played in the founding of this Nation, such as the fact that almost half of the signers of the Declaration of Independence were of Scottish descent, the Governors in 9 of the original 13 States were of Scottish ancestry, Scottish Americans successfully helped shape this country in its formative years and guide this Nation through its most troubled times;

Whereas this resolution recognizes the monumental achievements and invaluable contributions made by Scottish Americans that have led to America's preeminence in the fields of science, technology, medicine, government, politics, economics, architecture, literature, media, and visual and performing arts;

Whereas this resolution commends the more than 200 organizations throughout the United States that honor Scottish heritage, tradition, and culture, representing the hundreds of thousands of Americans of Scottish descent, residing in every State, who already have made the observance of Tartan Day on April 6 a success;

Whereas these numerous individuals, clans, societies, clubs, and fraternal organizations do not let the great contributions of the Scottish people go unnoticed:

Now, therefore, be it Resolved, That the Senate designates April 6 of each year as "National Tartan Day."


Long live Scotland!!

ailsa
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 5,598 • Replies: 68
No top replies

 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Apr, 2004 11:31 pm
Well that's nice, Ailsa.

I didnae ken aboot that.

Not all contributors here are American; I'm a bit closer to "Auld Scotia" myself, near Manchester.
I'll see if I can mark the occasion in some way, later on today.

Thanks for the post. Prompted, I found this:

http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/international.cfm?id=389192004
0 Replies
 
InTraNsiTiOn
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2004 12:00 am
I'm part scottish, and supposively have lot's of relatives in scotland, both on my mother and fathers side. I've always wanted to see if I could locate them. But thats kinda hard, don't even know there names!
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2004 12:19 am
Might be, some are interested in the original (Latin) text of

The Declaration of Arbroath

Quote:
The Declaration of Arbroath is the best known historical document in Scotland, famous for the line "It is not for honour nor riches, nor glory that we fight but for liberty alone, which no true man lays down except with his life."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/timelines/scotland/images/warofi6.jpg
Scotland's independence document - a detail of the Declaration of Arbroath ©

The Scots wrote this letter to the Pope because, six years after Bannockburn, Edward II refused to make peace with Scotland. They explained that Scotland had been an independent country before Edward I had tried to take it over and that Bruce was King, not just by birth and the Grace of God, but because he had successfully defended the kingdom. While the Pope replied to the letter, Edward did not.
(from the BBC)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2004 12:42 am
http://www.rampantscotland.com/know/graphics/arbroathabbey_shoppie2.jpg
Quote:
Arbroath Abbey hosted the most significant event in Scottish history. On 6 April 1320 the Scottish Declaration of Independence was signed by the assembled Scottish nobility in Arbroath Abbey.

King William the Lion founded the Arbroath Abbey in 1178 in honour of the murdered St. Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury. It was placed in the hands of the Tironensian order based in Kelso. King William granted his new Abbey independence from the mother house. He also showered it with endowments. These included the income from 24 parishes, a toft of land in every royal burgh, lands, fisheries, salt pans, ferries and of course Arbroath itself. The monks were permitted to set up a burgh, hold a market and to build a harbour. Even King John of England granted the Abbey the privilege of buying and selling goods anywhere in England, except the City of London, toll free.

The function of Arbroath and every other Abbey was to provide an ordered way of life based on the Gospel's teachings under which the monks could serve God and sanctify their souls. The monks did not work outside the Abbey. Their chief function was to perform the Divine Office.



SOURCE
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2004 05:29 am
Wha wad be a traitor knave?
Wha wad fill a coward's grave?
Wha sae base as be a slave?
Let him turn and flee.
Wha for Scotland's king and law
Freedom's sword would strongly draw?
Free man stand, or free man fa'
Let us do, or die.
0 Replies
 
ailsagirl
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2004 03:38 pm
Thank you, All
Thank you, All:

Many thanks for the information you provided. I find it fascinating!!


ailsa
0 Replies
 
ailsagirl
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 11:24 am
Does anyone know...?
Hello All,

I have often wondered when (and why) the term "Scotch" (used for a native of Scotland) changed to "Scot/Scots." Does anyone know?

Thanks,

ailsa
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 11:29 am
I don't think the people refer to themselves as "Scotch". I think they are "Scots" or, collectively, "Scottish". Perhaps McTag can weigh in on this...
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 11:52 am
"Scotch" is an American term, obviously never used - as D'artagnan already said above - in Scotland and very rarely in England - see e.g. "Scotch-Irish heritage", "Scotch Gaelic" etc, all American terms.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 01:14 pm
It's only used by those drinking Scots.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 01:22 pm
here is what the OED(1971 edition) has to say about "Scotch" and "Scots".
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Scotch : "the three forms of the adj., Scotch, Scottish, Scots, are still current, with some difference in use, which, however is somewhat unsettled. Down to the middle of the 16th c. the only form used in southern English was Scottish; but in the dislect of Scotland (and of that in the north of England in the 14th and 15th c.) was Scottis (cf. Englis = English), subsequently contracted to Scots. As far as our quotations show, the contraction of Scottish into Scots is not recorded before 1570 (in the compound Scotchman), though the colloquial pronounciation which it represents may well be much older; instances of Scotch cap, Scotch jig occur in 1591-1599, but the adj. did not become common in literature until the second half of the 17th c. From that time until recently Scotch has been the prevailing form in England, though Scottish has always been the more formal synonym. ... [there follow the various descriptions for the use of the word "Scotch/Scottish"].
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Scots : ' (Orig. Scottis, northern var. of Scottish) For the relation in use between this form and the two others see Scotch. ... [followed essentially by a repeat of the use of the word as under "Scotch"].
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
it seems that one should use "Scotch/Scottish" in formal presentations and formal language, and that "Scots" is used in everyday conversation. i wonder what the "Scotch/Scots" have to say about this. hbg
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 05:48 pm
Well, there's not much more to add about this.

I think it boils down to current fashion and practice.

I was brought up in the 1950s, and would agree with Walter's contention that the word "Scotch" is not much used in Scotland.
It is American, to my ear, and usually refers to whisky, in its principal use as a noun. As an adjective, it is NEVER used in Scotland, or in Britain I would say. (Or if it is, only in terms like "scotch eggs" or "scotch beef", which are limited and slightly jokey, in my view)

The words scots and scottish (as adjectives) are interchangeable, and custom dictates their use: for example, I would talk of "scots law", but "scottish touristry". There is not much distinction I can make about differences or shades of meaning here: I do not agree (respectfully) with HBG's suggestion that one is more formal than the other....but if anything, I would suggest the opposite from HBG's statement: the term "scots" is found in more highbrow texts, or in more traditional or older texts, than the more universal term "scottish".
That's how it seems to me.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 07:11 pm
Too bad I'm a day late to be celebrating this but I'll try to remember for next year. I didn't see a mention that the first few Canadian Prime Ministers were Scotland-born and bred. I thought THAT was impressive.

Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald -- born in Glasgow in 1815. Came to Canada in 1819. Was the first and third PM.
Prime Minister Alexander McKenzie -- born 1822 in Perthshire. Came to Canada in 1842. Second PM.

I was recently re-reading the much-hated "Five Articles of Perth" t'other day and quite surprised to read deeper into its history. The articles seem fairly mild for the times but I think it was the moment of ratification that may have botched it for them. I'll quote it for you:

Quote:
Five Articles of Perth
1. The sacrament of the body and blood of Christ should be received kneeling
2. It might be administered in private to the sick
3. When infants could not conveniently be baptized in church they might be baptized at home
4. Children being eight years old, and after being instructed in the Lord's Prayer, Creed, Ten Commandments, and Catechism, should be brought to the bishop on his visitation, to be examined in the religious knowledge, and to receive his blessing
5. The days commemorative of Christ's birth, passion, resurrection, ascension, and the sending down of the Holy Ghost should be kept in devout observance.

These articles were passed by General Assembly at Perth on the 25th of August, 1618. It would not be until the 4th of August, 1621 before Parliament would fully ratify them.

...nothing remained but the touch of the sceptre, by which symbolical deed the proceedings of the parliament would be declared ratified. But in the meantime a heavy darkness had been gathering over the building; and just when the royal commissioner had risen from the throne and extended the sceptre to touch the acts, a vivid flash of lighting shone through the building; a second succeeded, and then a third, followed by peals of thunder that shook the house and carried dismay into every heart.

To a generation that was seeking a sign, and that read the tokens of heavenly anger or approval in these sudden changes of the elements, this storm was the voice of God proclaiming his displeasure of the deed and demanding its revocation; but the prelatist party, after their fears had subsided, declared it a favourable omen, and that the same thunder and lightning which had confirmed the given of the old law on Mount Sinai, had been reawakened to attest the new laws which were now to be proclaimed. That day, which is Saturday, the 4th of August, was long after commemorated by the title of "Black Saturday."


That's from the A History of the Scottish People as posted on the Royal Stuart website.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 01:11 am
McTag wrote:
As an adjective, it is NEVER used in Scotland, or in Britain I would say. (Or if it is, only in terms like "scotch eggs" or "scotch beef", which are limited and slightly jokey, in my view)


During my first stay in Scotland in the 60's, exactly that was the first lesson, I got by everyone I met.

To be honest, it was a 'holiday-lasting' lesson. :wink:
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 12:10 pm
i was merely quoting the OED, namely : "From that time until recently Scotch has been the prevailing form in England, though Scottish has always been the more formal synonym." my own knowledge of the english language is just good enough for daily use, but not much more. this morning i questioned a retired professor of english from kingston's Royal Milititary College (trained at oxford), who made a lot of throat-clearing noises and finally pronounced : "yes, i believe there is no clear-cut rule for the use of these words" - more noises (we were both in the pool - not sure if the noises were of a drowning , retired prof). hbg ... good old sir john a. is well known in kingston, since he lived here for quite some years; one of his houses in kingston is now a historical monument. he was buried kingston's (municipal) cataraqui cemetery. his love of "a wee drop" is part of the kingston lore.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 12:20 pm
SCOTLAND
anyone interested in learning more about sir john a. can find it here(in kingston he is simply known as sir john a.) >>>JUST A WEE DROP
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 02:56 pm
I did notice that Sir John A. was closely connected to Kingston, hamburger, but thanks for adding that site. He seemed to be a good leader for Canada.

As for Scots, Scottish and Scotch, my Oxford Colour Dictionary says this:

Scots or Scottish is preferred to Scotch in Scotland except in the compound words given above. (Those included Scotch broth, Scotch mist, Scotch fir -- which is really a pine, Scotch terrier, Scotch whisky.)

The verb "scotch" means put an end to decisively, and (archaic) wound without killing.

The adverb "scot-free" means unharmed or unpunished.

Funny how all these words "Scot, Scotch, Scots, and Scottish" just happens to be between scorpion and scoundrel! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 03:40 pm
I've never heard of a Scotch fir...but there is a tree I like, a very handsome tree which grows well on sandy soils, called a Scots pine.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2004 03:47 pm
McTag wrote:
I've never heard of a Scotch fir...but there is a tree I like, a very handsome tree which grows well on sandy soils, called a Scots pine.


Scotch fir = pinus sylvestris, Scotch pine, Scots pine ("gemeine Kiefer" = common pine in German)


http://www.antiquemapsandprints.com/SCANSB/B-0758.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, EVERYONE! - Discussion by OmSigDAVID
WIND AND WATER - Discussion by Setanta
Who ordered the construction of the Berlin Wall? - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
True version of Vlad Dracula, 15'th century - Discussion by gungasnake
ONE SMALL STEP . . . - Discussion by Setanta
History of Gun Control - Discussion by gungasnake
Where did our notion of a 'scholar' come from? - Discussion by TuringEquivalent
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Since we're on the subject of Scotland...
Copyright © 2018 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 12/11/2018 at 05:09:23