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Do You Wash Your Chicken Before Cooking It?

 
 
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 02:06 pm
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/08/23/213578553/julia-child-was-wrong-don-t-wash-your-raw-chicken-folks?utm_source=npr&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=20130823

Quote:
Julia Child Was Wrong: Don't Wash Your Raw Chicken, Folks
by MARIA GODOY
August 23, 2013 8:48 AM

Excerpt:

"There's no reason, from a scientific point of view, to think you're making it any safer," she says, "and in fact, you're making it less safe."

That's because washing increases the chances that you'll spread the foodborne pathogens that are almost certainly on your bird all over the rest of your kitchen too, food safety experts say. We're talking nasty stuff like salmonella and Campylobacter, which together are estimated to cause nearly 1.9 million cases of foodborne illness in the U.S. each year.

Some studies suggest bacteria can fly up to 3 feet away from where your meat is rinsed — though you can't necessarily see it. If that thought alone doesn't give you pause, perhaps this slimy "germ vision" animation will do the trick:




Quote:
But fear not: All you have to do to kill these unwanted bacteria is to cook your meat properly (a thermometer can help) and keep your utensils and cooking surfaces clean.

Quinlan and her collaborators at New Mexico State University's Department of Media Productions have created a new public health campaign to get the word out about why washing poultry is a bad idea. Her focus-group surveys, conducted as part of a research project funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, suggest as many as 90 percent of people rinse their raw birds. The practice is slightly more common among minorities, she says, but pretty much everyone does it.

And Quinlan expects some people will continue to cling to their bird-rinsing ways. Some people, she notes, just do it because they think their chicken is slimy. "If your chicken is so slimy that it needs washing, something is wrong," she says. "Other people say, 'That's just how I was taught to do it.' "
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 02:17 pm
@Butrflynet,
I would have never ever thought about washing chicken before cooking it. So no. I have never washed raw chicken before. I rarely cook raw chicken myself as I am paranoid but the cleanup afterwards. I use bleach to clean the prep surfaces after I cook raw chicken.
dlowan
 
  5  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 03:18 pm
@tsarstepan,
Nope....I ain't no goddam chicken washer.

And I ain't raising no super germs by disinfecting every damn kitchen surface, neither.

Germs and I grew up together, I figure we can compromise and get along just fine.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 04:00 pm
@Butrflynet,
Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't. There are times the chicken seems to have a slight odor, and that's when I am more likely to rinse it off.

I always spray the inside of my sink, and everything else in the area, with an anti-bacterial/bleach spray afterward, and I am extremely careful about what else I touch when I'm handling raw chicken. It's very easy to contaminate faucets, spice jars, surfaces, etc. simply with your hands.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 04:20 pm
Yes, I do. Mostly because I have been in chicken processing plants and have seen chickens floating in large bins of fecal infested water. Yum.

I am careful washing the birds. I do it in the sink, without a lot, or much, splashing.
The bird is then paper towel dried and a placed on a cutting board for the herbing and trussing process.

Everything is cleaned within an inch of it's life once the bird is in the oven, cutting board, knives, countertops, backwalls and the sink.

Joe(so far no salmonella or e-Coli)Nation
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 04:40 pm
@Butrflynet,
I do. But it's really because I dry brine my chickens and washing gets rid of the extra salt.
spendius
 
  2  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 04:50 pm
@Joe Nation,
I have shaved mine before eating it a couple of times.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  4  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 04:56 pm
A quick rinse, particularly if there's blood. Then I play soft music while tying it up.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 04:58 pm
@boomerang,
Is that a Judy Rodgers (Zuni Cafe) recipe? I've been meaning to try that.

Me, I rinse the inside of the chicken rather gently, habit. Now that I like to spatchcock a whole chicken, the rinsing is very simple. I do clean the sink, but with soap and hot water.

I don't care about sterile counters, the raw chicken is never on one. I do care not to make bacteria resistant by constant fear. I've never been sick from eggs or chickens. I don't eat either of them raw, and keep them in a small area when preparing them and then rinse that well. Usually that is a tile I use for such food prep.

I was sick once, and only once, from food, that I remember, raw oysters (the one and only time I ever ate them, which was to be polite to a couple who were from Mexico City and wanted to treat me and my then boyfriend.) Sick as a dog, as they say. One of those lifetime memorable times of spewing propellently from more than one orifice. Muy romantico. That went away on its own.

Also, 65 years ago, I threw up after drinking root beer. That's about it.

Ironically, I did get a bacterial infection from contamination this past weekend - an old opened hydrating eyedrop solution, stored in a bathroom cabinet. Huh. The eye is better after the antibios. The eye is trouble prone anyway, so that may have been part of it.


edit - oops, I was also sick from a taco from a cafe in Guadalajara. Probably a matter of different bacterial flora.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 06:04 pm
@ossobuco,
It's kind of like her recipe. If I recall her's called for a seriously hot oven -- one I didn't think my oven would be comfortable with. I start it like hers -- dry brining for at least a day -- but then I loosen the skin and dry it in the fridge for at least one more day to help get the skin crispy while cooking at a lower temperature.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Aug, 2013 06:35 pm
@boomerang,
I want to copy you, that makes sense. For my next chicken's appearance..
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Tue 27 Aug, 2013 06:06 am
@jespah,
jespah wrote:

A quick rinse, particularly if there's blood. Then I play soft music while tying it up.

Do you often read excerpts of 50 Shades of Grey before you cook your chicken?
jespah
 
  4  
Reply Tue 27 Aug, 2013 06:34 am
@tsarstepan,
If I write 50 Shades of Grey fan fiction, will the universe explode?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 27 Aug, 2013 08:13 am
@tsarstepan,
sounds like the tsar is busy choking his chicken
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Aug, 2013 03:25 pm
@farmerman,
As a Chicken Consciousness adherent I object to this denigration of the sacred bird of the ancient Sumerian religion.

Has nobody read CLUCK! by Jon-Stephen Fink?

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Aug, 2013 06:06 pm
@spendius,
In the Good Ol Sumertime
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Aug, 2013 06:43 pm
@ossobuco,
I have to correct a misconception I had expressed at the end of that last post -

my recent exciting hospital visit was not due to a bug from an old hydrating eyedrop bottle. I saw an ophthalmologist today and it was due to a condition of my condition, if you follow me. Not any outside contaminating bacteria.

That's good news, actually. Easy enough to fix, as it happens, and I don't have to go around being bacteria scaredy cat in my own house.
scarlet01
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Aug, 2013 03:17 am
@Butrflynet,
I do yes. It's one of the finicky stuff I do, I guess. But after cleaning it I ensure the kitchen top and anything else that may have come in contact with it is cleaned well too.
spendius
 
  2  
Reply Wed 28 Aug, 2013 04:41 am
@scarlet01,
Take care scarlet--you can end up like Howard Hughes if you take pathogens too seriously. Humans spread them as well.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Aug, 2013 09:22 am
Back when I was a bacteriology major (degree in it), we had in our beginning class some illustrative test that involved our wiping our forearms with different substances to clean them and then testing the results by swabbing the demarked areas and plating those swabs on agar petri dishes. I forget what all we used, but they included hot water, soap and water, alcohol, phenol, iodine. Hot water, soap and water, and alcohol were similar in colonies showing up, though I think I remember alcohol was slightly better (slightly less colonies). Soap, after all, is a degreaser in action. Phenol was then used in O.R.'s and really did the job, as did iodine.

This stuff made now for counter washing is likely of small value and may even - with its anti bacterial properties - over time make bacteria resistant. Thus my take on plain soap and water being fine.

If you happen to have an active case of HIV or similar condition, then maybe there are other bits of advice out there from your m.d.
0 Replies
 
 

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