12
   

is it safe to use a lightly rusted razor?

 
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 04:37 am
@maxdancona,

I like this answer best of all.
maxdancona wrote:

I think the responses here are irrational.

Assuming that these aren't razors that have been used by someone else (which would be dangerous with or without rust) I can't imagine that a little rust will hurt anything.

Resistant bacteria is spread by contact with people. That isn't something that comes from razors you bought yourself. There is zero risk of bacterial infection from razors that haven't been used by someone else. This is true no matter how much rust there is.

I think the real risk here is that the blades wont be sharp enough to give a good shave. But if it is only a little rust, that won't hurt.

I would use razors with a little rust on them, as long as they were sharp enough.


0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 05:49 am
@Herald,
You are very entertaining.
Herald
 
  2  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 07:59 am
@maxdancona,
Quote:
You are very entertaining.
.
I have had good teachers ... like you for example.
Here is another professional opinion:
- Surgical instrument spotting, staining, and corrosion (rust) are serious problems in many healthcare facilities.
- Spotting lies loosely on the surface. Staining is integral with the surface. Corrosion penetrates the surface.
- Spotting, staining, and corrosion of surgical instruments can impair their function. For example , a ... may not open because of corrosion, scissors and scalpels could become dull, and instruments could break during surgery as a result of severe corrosion.
- Spotting, staining, and corrosion also interfere with sterilization. Spores can be protected from destruction during sterilization by the layers of iron oxide (rust).
- Soil residues that are allowed to dry on the surface of instruments can cause damages. Soils should not be allowed to dry onto the surface of instruments ...
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 06:31 pm
@savyrae,
If you're too cheap to buy new razors, I assume you are talking about the removable kind, just a few strokes on an Arkansas stone would remove the rust and put the edge back on the blade.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 06:50 pm
Rusty razors might be steril, but if contaminated, that rust will hold the bacteria much better than a new, clean blade. I use new blades - actually in a Shick double disposable.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 07:17 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

If you're too cheap to buy new razors, I assume you are talking about the removable kind, just a few strokes on an Arkansas stone would remove the rust and put the edge back on the blade.


Exactly! Get a new razor, cheapo! 64, now 65 responses on a question likely put by a Scot trying to save a few pennies?? Hell, give me your address and the type of razor you're using and I'll send you some new ones!
maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:07 pm
@roger,
Quote:
Rusty razors might be steril, but if contaminated, that rust will hold the bacteria much better than a new, clean blade


Come on Roger! You are making stuff up to back up your prejudice. I bet that you didn't even look to see if there is any reality to this claim (and yes I did check). I mean, do you have a link from a scientific source to back this up.

Again, as the CDC and EPA and the School of Medicine already referenced in this thread, rust doesn't come from "contamination" it comes from moisture. You all keep on wanting to link rust to bacteria. And yet, no one has come up with a link.

And you make up this claim that bacteria will "hold bacteria better" with zero facts to back this up.

Let's think logically about this. Rust is Ferrous oxide and is a stable compound of iron and oxygen. There is no reason to believe that the chemical compound is more conducive to bacterial growth... in fact the only scientific references made in this thread, including the CDC link found by Herald, say the contrary.

Razors today have moisturizing strips which are more porous than rust (with all the crevices you will imagine). Do you see that as more of a risk as the "crevices" in a little rust?

This is a just classic case of American hysteria. It is a neurotic obsession for sterility even when there is no scientific or medical reason for it.

This is the reason that we keep buying anti-bacterial soap even though scientist tell us that not only is the ineffective, but that it is actually harmful to our heath.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:10 pm
@maxdancona,
I agree. And anyway the topic was not dirty razors, but a little light rust.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:11 pm
@Mame,
The willingness of Americans to throw perfectly usable things away is obscene. Americans produce 25% of the world's trash in spite of the fact we are 5% of the world's population.

Throwing away a perfectly good razor because of little rust is not only crazy, it is irresponsible.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:16 pm
@maxdancona,
Bullshit! Exactly what prejudice are you accusing me of, here.

I promise you, I no more discriminate against rusty razor blades than rusty nails. That is a truely horseshit post.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:22 pm
@roger,
When I agreed with max's post I did not intend to extend the statement re prejudice.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:29 pm
@maxdancona,
Cut the you all.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:34 pm
@roger,
I meant "prejudice" in the strict dictionary definition of the word "preconceived opinion not based on reason or experience". I realize that this word now has a stronger implication that I did not intend.

I am simply suggesting that your rationalization that rust holds bacteria better is based on a preconceived notion that rust is dirty. It doesn't have any rational or factual basis.

I wasn't accusing you of bigotry toward razor blades.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:50 pm
@ossobuco,
Why? English needs a second person plural.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:51 pm
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 10:23 pm
@maxdancona,
Got it.
0 Replies
 
Stormy11
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 01:28 pm
@savyrae,
Ok I have 2 things to say.

1 being: a rusted razor has been exposed to air and water, both of which carry bacteria that can be transferred to the blade by just sitting it out in the open while wet. Also it depends on what surfaces the blade has touched. Some surfaces have possibly had someone else's soap, washcloth, razor, etc. on it and that in turn attracts and generates other bacteria, thus putting the risk of picking up something potentially dangerous.

And 2: My best friend's aunt picked up a skin eating disease called Necrotising Faceitis from a razor blade that had no visible rust on it at first glance, but on closer inspection had a very tiny spot in the corner. This disease spreads rapidly, taking anywhere from 20 minutes to 8 hours to incubate, then it begins to liquify the tissues of the body at an alarming rate. Secondary symptoms are nausea, headache, body ache, dizziness, vertigo, dry mouth and tremors. Any or none could occur, and the highly aggressive bacteria can enter the body from a nick even as small as a pinprick. I was with my friend and her aunt when they went to the hospital. In less than the 10 minute drive to the ER the spot that had appeared went from dime sized, to covering her entire inner thigh and most of her calf. the only remedy for such a case was to cut out the muscle and tissue around the infected area before it could spread further. The woman uses a wheelchair now because ahe lost over 96% of her leg muscle.

This is a rare disease, but VERY dangerous, and even deadly if not treated in time. So have caution for things like that.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 01:31 pm
We have every opinion on the spectrum. Take your pick, folks.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 01:38 pm
@Stormy11,
Good and interesting post, Stormy.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 18 Aug, 2013 01:40 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

We have every opinion on the spectrum. Take your pick, folks.

But if you are wise you will pick mine. Razz
0 Replies
 
 

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