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The best musical of all time?

 
 
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 12:08 pm
"Brigadoon" is also CinemaScope and even with the sets (which are well done), the Charisse/Kelly dance numbers are superb. It's definetely a good one to have in a collection -- the DVD is remarkable. But then one should add Astair's last musical film, "Finian's Rainbow" directed by, curiously, Francis Ford Copolla!
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Raggedyaggie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 01:12 pm
Musicals Very Happy I love all of the above. It's really difficult to pick favorites, but I'll give it a whirl.

1. Carousel - for sentimental reasons and because of the sailboat scene and the breathtaking ocean during the Soliloquy, and Jacques Dambois (sigh) performing the Carousel Waltz.

2. The original Showboat - because Paul Robeson's version of Ole Man River will always be my favorite and I loved Helen Morgan (from an old record) and I thought Hattie McDaniel was great.

3. South Pacific - After having seen it on stage, I was enthralled by the scenery. I could never understand why it received such terrible reviews. I loved the lemonish tint during "Some Enchanted Evening." :wink:

4. The Red Shoes - music, dancing, color, cinematography- all great. I never tire of watching it.

Did someone mention Slaughter on 10th Ave. Love it.
And I'm trying to remember a movie in which Cyd Charisse performed a song from The Desert Song. I think it was Deep in My Heart, the story of Sigmund Romberg with Jose Ferrer, but I'm not sure. I just remember how beautiful that ballet sequence was. I think James Mitchell was her
partner.

PS: Thank you Lightwizard and Jespah for inviting me to this great site.
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 02:02 pm
Hmmm.. mebbe I'm an odd-ball (no comments from the peanut gallery! Very Happy) but my one and only musical fav hasn't been listed yet - Fiddler on the Roof. I've never really been a big fan of musicals as a genere but.. Fiddler is always good to watch.
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 02:40 pm
<smacking self in forehead> Ow!

I love Fiddler for what are probably obvious reasons. However, hubby and I did put our feet down and refused to have "Sunrise, Sunset" played at our wedding.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 04:08 pm
Laughing Did you also refuse "Miracle of Miracles?"
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 07:00 pm
LW

Just looking at your two threads here suggests that someone (me) ought to begin work on 'Soylent Green - the Musical'.
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Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 07:09 pm
Has anyone mentioned, "The Producers?" Though not strictly a musical, there WERE musical numbers. (Can anyone forget, "Springtime for Hitler"?)

blatham- I don't know why, but your remark about "Soylent Green" reminded me of this! Mr. Green
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 07:14 pm
Springtime for Hitler - a work of art.

Likely those teeth which look like they'd relish a bit of stewed Minnesotan.
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Hazlitt
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Nov, 2002 09:48 pm
Blatham's point about Cyd Charisse projecting a sexuality better matched by Kelly than by Astaire is well taken. However, I'd still say that she was stronger and more athletic than Astaire and they are not well matched. So I'd say Kelly matched her in both sexual projection and in strength and athletic ability.

Astaire floated on air. Rogers best complemented his style.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 10:02 am
I agree that there wasn't any dancer who could upstage Astaire and I found the chemistry in "The Bandwagon" was strictly a fantasy but who cares? The best musicals are almost entirely fantasy -- unless you know someone who breaks out into song at a crucial point of conversation. "The Bandwagon" was the ultimate "let's put on a show" and had a lot of heart.
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 12:06 pm
Hazlitt

I hesitate to put too fine a point on it, but in truth, I simply don't have nearly enough to do today. I guess I'd put forward my sense of it, or perhaps my personal response to it, in this way.

Knowing the incredible rigor and hours that Astaire consistently put into practice and rehearsals, I don't think we could assume that Charisse was 'stronger' or 'more athletic' than him. It seems to that the difference lies in the style or expression. Charisse's and Kelly's training and styles incorporated ballet and modern dance - both allowing them a range of 'expansive' choreographic options which weren't in Astaire's tool kit. If Astaire's choreography might be encapsulated with one word, that word could perphaps be 'dignified'. I don't mean this as a value judgement - I'd rather watch Astaire - but I think that this is where the incompatibility between he and Charisse might be found.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 12:36 pm
Now, see, blatham -- we totally agree here and nicely put, btw.

In "The Bandwagon," and "Silk Stockings," Astaire went out of the way to move toward a more balletic expression. There's no doubt about his athleticism in the Mickey Spillane sequence whitch is jazz ballet throughout.
That film shows Astaire as the most versitile dancers of all time and why Barishikov so adored his dancing. Kelly was really able to power his way through dance sequences with Charisse -- Leslie Caron in "An American in Paris" was a more ingratiating match, especially in the dramatics of the love story. Charisse was not an actress -- any wonder why the Astaire/Rogers match was so impossible to duplicate?
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 01:12 pm
LW

We are in accord once again. Bring that box with all those "Riders of the Purple Sage" records back. But your mom's feet still stink.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 01:19 pm
Laughing I bought my Mom a case of Foot Locker spray -- so I think it's
the Cheeze Whiz you're smelling. I do wish you'd stop bathing in it.
Laughing
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 01:23 pm
Re cheeze whiz....I met an american fellow quite a few years ago who managed to get himself out of the service by putting cheese whiz in his ears several hours before med exams...docs couldn't figure out what was draining, but it scared them.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 01:53 pm
Oh my gawd -- I just cheddar to think!
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 03:59 pm
If St. Peter has any taste at all, that one you may regret.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 04:43 pm
Well, a pun my word, I have sinned -- it's gouda you to remind me I might not make it into heaven but it won't make me blue.
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 09:37 pm
Uncle!
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Hazlitt
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Nov, 2002 10:11 pm
LW & Blatham, I defer to your profound insight into the world of dance. I simply had not thought it through.

LW I also liked the noir sequence in Bandwagon. The start up with Astaire snarling our the "She was bad, she was dangerous, and I didn't trust her as far as I could throw her. But she was my kind of woman" was wonderful (not sure I quoted that accurately).
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