8
   

Yiddish or German Saying

 
 
Willyc
 
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 11:22 am
My father used to have an expression in either Yiddish or German that loosely translated as: "Buy a bargain, catch a cold". Does anyone know of the original expression?
 
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 05:20 pm
@Willyc,
Will no luck with Google
So can you suggest another possible wording
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 05:44 pm
@Willyc,
Be right back
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 06:54 pm
@glitterbag,
Did he use any words like 'metsie' or 'kalt'?
Willyc
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 06:50 am
@glitterbag,
Not sure...my father's passed 13 years ago. He would translate the saying as I stated. The meaning was somewhat equivalent to the English saying "penny wise pound foolish".
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 10:09 am
@Willyc,
Google Yiddish dictionary, there are several versions and its a lot of fun reading all the numerous phrases. My parents were born in Baltimore, and when I was very young everybody new a little Yiddish, polish, Greek, Italian etc. because so many grandparents were from the 'old country'. I think you will find what you are looking for in the online dictionaries. My family came from Ireland and there were many sayings bounced around that definitely originated from there. Good luck.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 10:13 am
@Willyc,
It's not a (proper) German saying.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 10:30 am
@Willyc,
Willyc wrote:

My father used to have an expression in either Yiddish or German that loosely translated as: "Buy a bargain, catch a cold". Does anyone know of the original expression?


I would guess that the origin of the expression was to dissuade people from buying at a store that had discounts. Perhaps, its origins were not based on philo-Semitic feelings, since Jews were known to attract customers that are looking for a discount? Otherwise, many a customer would not go to a Jewish owned store.
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 11:25 am
@Foofie,
Really foofie? That's close to the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 11:29 am
@glitterbag,
Quote:
...the most ridiculous thing...
Okay Bag but exactly where and in what aspect
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 11:45 am
@dalehileman,
The implication is that the only possible reason a consumer would shop in a 'Jewish' establishment is because they are guaranteed a lower price, otherwise no non-Jew would ever patronize such a store. It smacks of misunderstanding. And no, I am not Jewish, I just don't like stereotyping. Pushing the boundary here, no one would enter an Irish operated business for fear everybody was drunk. That of course is ridiculous, and so is foofie's rational.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 11:51 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

I would guess that the origin of the expression was to dissuade people from buying at a store that had discounts. Perhaps, its origins were not based on philo-Semitic feelings, since Jews were known to attract customers that are looking for a discount? Otherwise, many a customer would not go to a Jewish owned store.
So you are familiar with this saying?
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 11:56 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I'm betting not. He/she said it was a guess.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 12:04 pm
@glitterbag,
A guess about an expression with was either Yiddish or German. Okay. But a bit meschuggo (in German meschugge, in English Yiddish meshuggah) as well.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 12:17 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Yes, Yiddish phrases vary slightly from region to region, country of origin. There are a ton of Yiddish words used all the time in my part of the US. Phooey and bubkas instantly come to mind. There a number of Yiddish dictionaries online, and I've been searching for this phrase (penny wise pound foolish) but its becoming a bit laborious.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 12:29 pm
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:
The implication is that the only possible reason a consumer would shop in a 'Jewish' establishment is because they are guaranteed a lower price, otherwise no non-Jew would ever patronize such a store. It smacks of misunderstanding. And no, I am not Jewish, I just don't like stereotyping. Pushing the boundary here, no one would enter an Irish operated business for fear everybody was drunk. That of course is ridiculous, and so is foofie's rational.
Presumably, the Jews know whether or not
thay consider themselves to be surrounded by antipathy.
He appears to be expressing his opinion on that point.





David
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 12:37 pm
@glitterbag,
There are two universities here (in Trier and Düsseldorf) with Yiddish departments. While they focus mainly an German-Yiddish, the chair for Yiddish literature at the University of Jewish Studies, (Hochschule für Jüdische Studien) Heidelberg teaches and researches all kinds of Yiddish "dialects".
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 12:38 pm
@Foofie,
Willyc wrote:
My father used to have an expression in either Yiddish or German that loosely translated as: "Buy a bargain, catch a cold".
Does anyone know of the original expression?
Foofie wrote:
I would guess that the origin of the expression was to dissuade people
from buying at a store that had discounts.
Alleging that such a store
is a threat to their health (catching a cold) ?




Foofie wrote:

Perhaps, its origins were not based on philo-Semitic feelings,
since Jews were known to attract customers that are looking for a discount?
Otherwise, many a customer would not go to a Jewish owned store.
Foofie, in your understanding,
for the most part, do Jews consider themselves to be surrounded by ill will ?





David
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 12:59 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Great David, now that you have completely executed your illegal left turn, what can you add to the discussion regarding the translation. Lets try to find that out, shall we?
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 01:16 pm
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:
Great David, now that you have completely executed your illegal left turn,
what can you add to the discussion regarding the translation. Lets try to find that out, shall we?
I cant help u with that.
I dunno Yiddish nor German.

I simply commented on your comment
and raised questions on Foofie 's.
 

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