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Reply Sun 21 Mar, 2004 02:58 pm
http://image2.sina.com.cn/nx/n/2004-03-17/U204P133T3D7185F57DT20040317142130.jpg

Could you translate the French on the woman's chest into English?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 10,957 • Replies: 72
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doglover
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Mar, 2004 05:06 pm
A
I can't help ya oristar....I need a french translation to english myself. BTW ~ Are you sure that's really a woman? Shocked

Can anyone tell me what 'Socra Blur' means?
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Setanta
 
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Reply Sun 21 Mar, 2004 07:43 pm
That's sacré bleu, Quinn, and it means "holy blue"--think "holy ****!"

Oristar, i have never seen the word racolage. I'm not an expert, but i am comfortably fluent in French. The verb coller means to glue or to paste together. Perhaps this is idiomatic, or slang. Passif, six mois de prison means "--passive, six months in prison." Perhaps a native speaker would know what "racolage" means, but i'm clueless (and suspicious).
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Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Mar, 2004 07:58 pm
solicitating - 6 months in jail

Solicitating is to approach or accost (a person) with an offer of sexual services. She's obviously a bitter hooker.

Sacre Blue! is an exclamation in french. Like oh my god, or holy crap. It's a play on Sacre Coeur, or Sacred Heart, which like most curses in french are blasphemy based, so you get 'sacred blue'. Unlike english swear which are all about sex.
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Eos
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Mar, 2004 09:28 pm
that's soliciting not solicitating. So your translation should read: Passive solicitation: 6 months in prison.
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Ceili
 
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Reply Sun 21 Mar, 2004 10:42 pm
My spelling sucks, sorry.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2004 12:46 pm
The most probable translation, yes, would be 'Passive soliciting: six months in prison.' I took interest in the word 'passif' above all others, and the arrow pointing down towards her nether region. I thought at first that the 'six months' in prison after 'passive' solicitation-- i.e. being raped, the 'soliciting' not being made by her but being read by the man due to post-feminist society today-- were psychological; yet, obviously, the effects would last longer than that. So, the above conjecture was completely pointless, and she's probably a prostitute, not a victim.




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joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 01:20 am
Ceili wrote:
Sacre Blue! is an exclamation in french. Like oh my god, or holy crap. It's a play on Sacre Coeur, or Sacred Heart, which like most curses in french are blasphemy based, so you get 'sacred blue'. Unlike english swear which are all about sex.

"Sacré bleu" is a substitute for "sacré Dieu" (holy God), not "sacré coeur, in much the same way that "gosh" is a substitute for "God" or "cripes" is a substitue for "Christ" in English. "Bleu" and "Dieu" rhyme, so the inoffensive "blue" is substituted for the profane "God."
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Setanta
 
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Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 05:27 am
If that's so, it's what the French would refer to as a "poor" rhyme, and i'm inclined to agree . . .
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 06:21 am
'Racolage' is "looking for customers", here: specially used re prostitution.

'Sacre bleu' is similar in every day's use to "Mein Gott" in German, "Mama mia" in Italian ... and used as often :wink:
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joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 09:32 am
Setanta wrote:
If that's so, it's what the French would refer to as a "poor" rhyme, and i'm inclined to agree . . .

I think the French would regard it as "close enough." From Cyrano de Bergerac:

    CYRANO Oui, vous m'arrachez tout, le laurier et la rose! Arrachez! Il y a malgre vous quelque chose Que j'emporte, et ce soir, quand j'entrerai chez [b]Dieu[/b], Mon salut balaiera largement le seuil [b]bleu[/b], Quelque chose que sans un pli, sans une tache, J'emporte malgre vous, (Il s'elance l'epee haute) et c'est. . . ROXANE C'est?. . . CYRANO Mon panache.
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Setanta
 
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Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 09:47 am
I was referring to the classification of rhymes: a single matching pair of phonemes is described as "poor," two matching phonemes if described as "sufficient," and three or more matching phonemes is described as "rich." In the poem you cite here, all of the rhymes would be classified as "poor" with the exception of tache--panache, in which the poetice pronunciation of the otherwise silent "e" would make them "sufficient."

For another example, Paul Verlaine's Nevermore, which follows:

Souvenir, souvenir, que me veux-tu ? L'automne
Faisait voler la grive à travers l'air atone,
Et le soleil dardait un rayon monotone
Sur le bois jaunissant où la bise détone.

Nous étions seul à seule et marchions en rêvant,
Elle et moi, les cheveux et la pensée au vent.
Soudain, tournant vers moi son regard émouvant :
« Quel fut ton plus beau jour ? » fit sa voix d'or vivant,

Sa voix douce et sonore, au frais timbre angélique.
Un sourire discret lui donna la réplique,
Et je baisai sa main blanche, dévotement.

- Ah ! les premières fleurs, qu'elles sont parfumées !
Et qu'il bruit avec un murmure charmant
Le premier « oui » qui sort de lèvres bien-aimées !


The first four rhymes are "sufficient," as are the next four, and the two following are also sufficient in that "-lique" in poesie would have the final silent "e" pronounced--but are followed by four "poor" rhymes. Rich rhymes are very difficult to achieve, which is one of the reasons that Corneille and Racine have been so highly regarded by the literary French.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 09:51 am
Hey, the French equate heavy perfuming as "close enough" to bathing. I would suggest that explains their rhyme.
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joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 10:13 am
I shall be filing this information away under the heading "learn something new every day."

Setanta wrote:
I was referring to the classification of rhymes: a single matching pair of phonemes is described as "poor," two matching phonemes if described as "sufficient," and three or more matching phonemes is described as "rich." In the poem you cite here, all of the rhymes would be classified as "poor" with the exception of tache--panache, in which the poetice pronunciation of the otherwise silent "e" would make them "sufficient."

No, rose and chose would also be rimes suffisantes.

For more information on this endlessly fascinating topic, do what I did and check out RIME ET RICHESSE DES RIMES EN VERSIFICATION FRANÇAISE CLASSIQUE (.pdf file).
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 10:23 am
Yes, you are correct about rose-chose, given the pronunciation of the otherwise silent "e." I had to learn this for the advanced undergraduate French courses i took while employed at the University of Illinois. My final product was an imitation of La Fontaine, in which, of 54 rhyme pairs, all were sufficient, except for six pairs, which were rich.

I forget which obscurantist wit it was, but i will quote the unknow joker:

Je meur de soif aupres de La Fontaine.
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Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 10:30 am
Joe, I've heard it either way, but again, like I said, most french curses are bases on blasphemy while english are mostly about sex.
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Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 03:03 pm
You can also say "mon Dieu"...in Dutch: "(oh) mijn God!" But in our secular country, people tend to use more ehh powerful words: "k*t", "godverdomme" or a simple "f*ck" - pronounced in Dutch more as "f*k" (how do you mean, Americanized?...) :wink:
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 03:30 pm
Yeah Ceili, I've been wondering about that....when we English say 'f- you' aren't we wishing on someone else something we want ourselves? It doesn't make sense, really. Now 'audit you' seems like a much stronger curse to me.
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patiodog
 
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Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2004 03:41 pm
It's short for "Let Jesus..."

Well, you've seen the Exorcist.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Wed 24 Mar, 2004 01:13 pm
cavfancier wrote:
Yeah Ceili, I've been wondering about that....when we English say 'f- you' aren't we wishing on someone else something we want ourselves? It doesn't make sense, really. Now 'audit you' seems like a much stronger curse to me.


Laughing You are right, though, Cav; 'f/ck you' is more of a blessing than a curse.

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