5
   

What does MVP stand for exactly?

 
 
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 06:38 am
Is there any difference between "most valuable player" and "most valued player"? I always thought MVP stands for the former until I meet the latter in a textbook today. Please let me know whether they are the same or not. Thx!
 
Setanta
 
  4  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 06:43 am
In the United States, MVP stands for "most valuable player." I've never heard of "most valued player," which is not, of course, conclusive. Was the textbook written by a native speaker of English? If so, is the author American, or a speaker of non-American English?
chrisking
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 07:52 am
@Setanta,
Wow, thanks for your fast reply. The book is written by both Chinese and British Scholars, first published in 2006. I don't feel good about this text but I have to use it anyway. Is it possible that it is used in non-American English? But I've never heard of it either.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 07:53 am
@chrisking,
Sure it's possible--but unless and until an Englishman shows up to tell us, i can't help you with that.
chrisking
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 08:01 am
@Setanta,
That's all right. Thx u all the same Smile
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 02:25 pm
In the sense that the two are words are being used here, "valued" and "valuable" are really interchangeable synonyms.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 03:12 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
unless and until an Englishman shows up to tell us


Whatever the V stands for, "MVP" is nit widely used in British sport, and is mainly seen as a foreign term, although I see the UK Professional Cricketer's Association has lists of "MVPs" which it calls "Most Valuable Player rankings". The term is a comparatively recent import to British sport, until recently being mainly confined to Canada, the United States, the Philippines and South Korea, although Australia uses the term for the National Basketball League. In the Australian Football League, the term "best and fairest" is more commonly used than "most valuable player" for the equivalent award on a season basis, and "best on ground" (BOG) is more commonly used for a single-match award.


contrex
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 03:50 pm
I would point out that there can be a considerable difference between 'valuable' (measurable) and 'valued' (subjective).

George has a valuable collection of jewels.
Reverend Jones is a valued member of the community.

Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 03:57 pm
@contrex,
I would agree with that in general terms, contrex. What I am saying is that within the context of what does MVP stand for, it makes no semantic difference whether the word is "valuable" or "valued." You could substitute the word "videotaped" and the meaning would still be the same.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 04:32 pm
@contrex,
No we don't use it. It's an American notion.

We use MPV for multi-purpose vehicle, though.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 04:37 pm
@McTag,
McTag wrote:

No we don't use it. It's an American notion.

We use MPV for multi-purpose vehicle, though.


Interesting. In the USA we call those ATVs -- All Terrain Vehicles.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 04:45 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:
What I am saying is that within the context of what does MVP stand for, it makes no semantic difference whether the word is "valuable" or "valued." You could substitute the word "videotaped" and the meaning would still be the same.


I don't quite see what you mean by this. If I see a table of "most valuable players" I think I would suppose that the ranking had been arrived at by counting tries, touchdowns, goals, wickets or whatever quantitative measure of a player's usefulness to their team was most suitable. If I see that Joe Smith is a team's most "valued player" I think I would suppose that he had been voted into that position, perhaps by fans or fellow team members or both. You have not convinced me that this is not the right way to use these words.

0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 04:47 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:

McTag wrote:

No we don't use it. It's an American notion.

We use MPV for multi-purpose vehicle, though.


Interesting. In the USA we call those ATVs -- All Terrain Vehicles.


You don't. You call them "minivans". Here is an MPV

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/72/Kia_Carnival_front_20071031.jpg/220px-Kia_Carnival_front_20071031.jpg
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 05:17 pm
@contrex,
Ahh. I was thinking of vehicles such as Land Rovers and other four-wheel drive type of conveyances. That's what we refer to as ATVs.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 07:39 pm
I don't think so. This is more what I think of as an ATV (and it's what Google Images thinks is one too)

 http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQXefB_Oc7CTCNESUWlv4Iqi6FBRoVi_2lrcXHdDR-aDShAMyrB
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 07:44 pm
BrE speakers also have "utes", as in utility vehicles, which I had this sort of nebulous picture of, maybe like an SUV maybe like a parcel van or maybe like a WWII jeep and its descendants. Turns out that Google Images thinks it's what we would call a pickup truck.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2013 12:25 pm
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:

BrE speakers also have "utes", as in utility vehicles, which I had this sort of nebulous picture of, maybe like an SUV maybe like a parcel van or maybe like a WWII jeep and its descendants. Turns out that Google Images thinks it's what we would call a pickup truck.


That is exactly what a 'ute' is. AusE and possibly NZe speakers have 'utes' - UK based BrE speakers might use the term ironically when what they mean is a "pickup truck". SAE speakers have 'bakkies' by the way.

By the way, the term MPV is more something that automobile dealers might use, in everyday speech people are more likely to such a vehicle a 'people carrier'.





contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2013 03:11 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:
in everyday speech people are more likely to such a vehicle a 'people carrier'.


That's

in everyday speech UK people are more likely to call such a vehicle a 'people carrier'

I guess initialism-spewing automobile nerds might say "MPV", and like I said, car salesmen.

0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2013 03:27 pm
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:

BrE speakers also have "utes", as in utility vehicles, which I had this sort of nebulous picture of


I would have expected a utility vehicle to be one of those trucks the guys working for the electric company have - with the big hoists and all.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2013 04:41 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

I would have expected a utility vehicle to be one of those trucks the guys working for the electric company have - with the big hoists and all.


Likewise. As I pointed out, it's an Australasian regional term, and they are weird.
0 Replies
 
 

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