46
   

Lola at the Coffee House

 
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 03:36 pm
@spendius,
What in particular is it that you find so attractive about hanging out with these poseurs, Spendi?
spendius
 
  0  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 04:57 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
and stopped shutting the door on my boss who sometimes played Renata Tebaldi while designing.


Does it really matter osso that he was "designing"? He might just as easy have been filleting fish.

That's how pats-on-the back are done.

Have you read the Life of Rossini by Stendhal?
ossobuco
 
  3  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 06:49 pm
@spendius,
You don't seem to understand joy.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 06:50 pm
<harumpf on the bumps>
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 08:31 pm
@ossobuco,
Spendi's already told us that, "pleasure is Satan's ammo," so how could he understand joy or experience it?

He also isn't really interested in learning anything about his fellow patrons in this cafe. You shared something of yourself with us, both the music you have, and your memories associated with it. Those are very personal things, particularly your memories. Rather than just accepting what you said, as expressing something about your past experience, and the people who were part of your life, spendi picked at it, looking for something he could criticize, something, that in his mind, he could score some points with.

Personally, I'm sick of listening to that kind of pointless jabbing--he's being so consistently contentious and demeaning toward other posters, apparently for no reason other than some perverse form of self amusement, and a compulsive need to display his capacity for pettiness. It's starting to poison the atmosphere in a venue that's supposed to be a relaxed meeting place. Even vonny recently said she didn't want to respond to him because she didn't want to hear another rant.

Anyway, I am also an opera fan, particularly Italian opera. I grew up in a home where the radio was always tuned in on Saturday afternoons to the live broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera, so it was always part of the music I heard fairly regularly. I didn't really fully appreciate it until I was fairly adult, and began assembling my own music collection, and listening to my favorite singers and operas, first on records, then on CD's, and now on DVDs, where I can enjoy watching the opera as well as hearing it. I have quite a growing collection of opera DVDs now.

And I am just delighted that pbs now re-broadcasts all of the operas from the Met which are screened live, and in HD, in movie theaters for many of the Saturday performances that are also on the radio. I've gotten to see, and enjoy, so many new operas that way I will be forever grateful to pbs.

I notice that you have the legendary Beniamino Gigli in your record collection. That's something I don't have. Just the sight of his name sent me scurrying to You Tube so I could hear that voice.


Now listening to that was joy, pure joy.



ossobuco
 
  3  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 08:43 pm
To spendius, I'm sorry you don't get the play and joy of design.

To the rest of you who keep up the feed, go with it. I've read his posts for about ten years, and decline. This flibberitygibbity foo is not new.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 08:52 pm
@ossobuco,
Hey Osso. Can you explain why Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev is threatened with the death penalty yet the guys who did the My Lai massacre and the hundreds or thousands of other My Lai massacres, or the big wigs in the Pentagon right on up to the president who covered these massacres all up are instead getting US pensions?

Something seems awfully amiss.
ossobuco
 
  7  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 09:04 pm
@JTT,
No, I can't.
As I've said countless times, I think I had many of your opinions before you did. My beef with you is that you inject this stuff in blanket fashion for attention, whatever thread you can and at the least I think that is a dumb move. Past that, you insult people who might consider your view every chance you can get. You get your rocks off with mockery with no quarter to your targets, that is, all a2kers.

You are a pest, plain and simple. Shut the **** up.
You have been told you are not welcome on the thread and you slime around for attention.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 09:07 pm
@ossobuco,
Apologies to everybody else. I won't do that again for another five years.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 09:25 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
Hey Osso. Can you explain why Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev is threatened with the death penalty yet the guys who did the My Lai massacre and the hundreds or thousands of other My Lai massacres, or the big wigs in the Pentagon right on up to the president who covered these massacres all up are instead getting US pensions?

Something seems awfully amiss.



Quote:
No, I can't.


You might be able to, Osso, if you and the others were willing to think a bit.

Here's a very interesting article, apropos of this very thread, and y'all. I'm starting it in half way thru, because that is the point Boston comes in at, again, very apropos.

Quote:
America, Long on Indifference, Short on Indignation

http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/26429-indifference-indignation.html

...

The Boston Marathon terror incident made me revisit that extended coffee break with my friend, and what has happened in the twelve years hence. We now have Homeland Security “defending” us – from little, other than fear – at a total budget authority which approaches $60 billion annually. Two wars and more than a trillion dollars later, we have raised our chances for fear possibly ten, maybe even a hundred-fold… something which will eventually mature in terror to be perpetrated by those who’ll try to avenge the long line of victims the US has left behind in its imperial quest.

And added to the grievous vice of our indifference is our lack of indignation in watching ourselves being marched to the slaughter house and not showing an ounce of courage, a legitimate cry of indignation. It became evident, if only in the economic arena, when the Occupy Movement made an attempt to pinpoint blame for the nation’s economic ills. Indignation never materialized… indifference quickly suffocating the cries of a few.

As for any questioning by Americans of the seeds which grow terror; that will never happen while the empire continues waving its flags from hundreds of enclaves all over the world. Unfortunately, most Americans find pride in that, not indignation.

Anton Chekhov in his Gooseberries could just as easily have been writing about life a century later in this America of ours: “I look at this life and see the arrogance and the idleness of the strong, the ignorance and bestiality of the weak, the horrible poverty everywhere, overcrowding, drunkenness, hypocrisy, falsehood. . . . Meanwhile in all the houses, all the streets, there is peace; out of fifty thousand people who live in our town there is not one to kick against it all.

Think of the people who go to the market for food: during the day they eat; at night they sleep, talk nonsense, marry, grow old, piously follow their dead to the cemetery; one never sees or hears those who suffer, and all the horror of life goes on somewhere behind the scenes. Everything is quiet, peaceful, and against it all there is only the silent protest of statistics…” So much for indignation, the silent protest of statistics! Whether Chekhov’s town of 50,000 or today’s US of 315+ million people, we are all immersed in our selfish little lives proudly displaying what could be society’s worst vice: indifference… indifference to “all the horror of life [that] goes on somewhere behind the scenes.”

Indifference has historically been accepted by multiple cultures and religions as a vice. Isn’t it about time, in an era where democracy appears to be slowly gaining ground, that we successfully battle such vice with its corresponding virtue: indignation? After all, indignation is not just anger, but righteous anger at people or situations that are truly offensive or unjust to the better nature of humankind.

As we look at the arrogance of the strong, and the ignorance of the weak, we can’t help but recognize that at least for now… vice rules over virtue and our country will continue to remain long on indifference and short on indignation. And that’s not a prescription to cure us from terrorism… or, what’s even worse, the fear of terrorism.


0 Replies
 
Diane
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 09:25 pm
@firefly,
Thank you for posting the bit of Nessum Dorma. It was pure joy.

Thanks to Osso for posting her eclectic list of recordings. She and I share a love of similar music.

Wassau, how about some chamomile tea before bedtime?
JTT
 
  -4  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 09:43 pm
A little bedtime reading, or for the all nighters, or something to wake up to.

Quote:

http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/26428-tsarnaevs-motive.html

What If the Tsarnaev's Motive Was Revenge for U.S. Foreign Policy?


Tuesday, 23 April 2013 09:12

By Sheldon Richman


On the day of the Boston Marathon bombings, President Obama stood in the White House briefing room and said, “We will find out who did this; we’ll find out why they did this.”

What motivated the murderous acts allegedly committed by Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarvaev is the question on everyone’s mind. We would be surprised if it were not.

But will people remain interested in the motive if they don’t like what they hear?

Judging by the recent past, the answer might well be no. After 9/11, people wondered why anyone would kill indiscriminately by flying airplanes into buildings. The Bush administration and others leapt to an unlikely conclusion: the hijackers “hated our freedom.” That seemed to satisfy most people. But it made little sense, and based on previous incidents, we already had ample reason to believe the answer lay elsewhere. Earlier perpetrators of violence from the Middle East had made clear that what fueled their hatred of America was U.S. foreign policy in the region and the larger Muslim world. Osama bin Laden’s own fatwa against the United States named three offenses: support for Israel’s occupation of Palestine, the presence of American military forces near Muslim holy sites in Saudi Arabia, and the devastation of Iraq through 10 years of bombing and economic sanctions.

But most American officials did not want to hear — and did not want the American people to hear — that Muslim violence was in retaliation for U.S. foreign policy. When Ron Paul, a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 2008, criticized U.S. interventionist foreign policy during a primary debate, he was admonished by another candidate, Rudy Giuliani, among others, who claimed he had never heard such an outrageous thing. Giuliani was either lying or unaware that the official 9/11 commission and the Pentagon had previously acknowledged that U.S. foreign policy creates resentment among Muslims.

What about the Tsarnaevs? We await the facts, and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev reportedly told authorities his acts were motivated by “religious fervor.” But it’s a good bet this resentment was part of their motivation. The Tsarnaev family is Chechen, but Chechnya’s beef is with Russia, not the United States, so that seems an unlikely source of a desire to kill and injure runners and spectators in Boston.

It is more likely the young men were angered by U.S. drone warfare that has killed thousands of Muslims in Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia; brutal occupations in Iraq and Afghanistan; backing for dictators and corrupt monarchs throughout the Muslim world; and unwavering material and moral support for Israel’s oppression and humiliation of the Palestinians, with no end in sight. The Washington Post reports that a neighbor of Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the older, deceased brother, told him, “In Afghanistan, most casualties are innocent bystanders killed by American soldiers.”

If revenge for U.S. foreign policy was the motive, what will happen next? Will such evidence prompt a national reconsideration of America’s decades-old imperial foreign policy? Or will it be quickly dismissed, while the bombings are exploited in an effort to double down on that foreign policy. U.S. Rep. Peter King, a Republican, has already begun that effort. (Interestingly, Alberto Gonzalez, who was attorney general under President George W. Bush, acknowledged on CNN over the weekend that U.S. foreign policy is indeed resented by Muslims abroad and prompts a desire for revenge.)

There is much we still don’t know about the Tsarnaev brothers and why they chose their deadly path. (What, if anything, did it have to do with Chechen organized crime?) Maybe it will turn out that they simply developed a hatred for what they saw as American licentiousness and felt they needed to strike out at it. (That Dzhokhar Tsarnaev partied at his college after the bombings, casts doubt on that prospect.)

It seems far more likely that the murder-by-drone of Muslim children, the no-knock night raids of Afghan homes, the daily humiliation of and violence against Palestinians, and the support for violent and corrupt rulers are what made these men want to exact vengeance against Americans.

Of course, none of this would justify killing innocents. But if we wish to prevent such wanton crimes in the future, we’d better understand what motivates the criminals who commit them.

0 Replies
 
Lola
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2013 10:03 pm
@Diane,
Quote:
Wassau, how about some chamomile tea before bedtime?


Wassau sets the chamomile tea on the table before Diane. Wiping his hands on his apron, he says, "so nice to see you here again." Tell me, what have you been up to lately?
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Apr, 2013 02:21 am

Do not serve Spendi any more coffee until he answers my question.
FOUND SOUL
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Apr, 2013 02:41 am
@McTag,
I'm gonna need a coffee when I wake up, or two, cuppacino please, I will put my order in now, 6.30am ... bacon and eggs? No, no, sauteed mushrooms with cherry tomatoes and a little bit of feta cheese , much healthier I think ... If that's ok Was... Z....S..Z...
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Apr, 2013 03:42 am
@McTag,
I cant remember the exact words I read but it was something like "Keep it up Barry, we are all proud of you." And Manilow said that he couldn't tell whether it was a compliment or a put down.

Sorry I overlooked it Mac but ff has been calling me a lot of names and I became distracted.

May I have a coffee now?

They are all hi-tech buskers. Inc. Dylan. It feeds on our desire, maybe need, for spectacle, colour and movement.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Apr, 2013 03:47 am
@spendius,

Certainly.

I kind of like Barry Manilow, when I'm in my cups. He writes the songs that make the whole world sing.

And not to forget:

Her name was Lola
She was a showgirl
With feathers in her hair
And her dress cut down to there...
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Apr, 2013 03:51 am
@McTag,
I much prefer--

"Up on the white veranda She wears a necktie and a Panama hat
Her passport shows a face from
Another time and place
She looks nothin' like that
And all the remnants of her recent past
Are scattered in the wild wind
She walks across the marble floor
Where a voice from the gambling room is callin' her to come on in
She smiles, walks the other way
As the last ship sails and the moon fades away
From Black Diamond Bay"

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Apr, 2013 04:26 am
@spendius,
And I prefer

Noel Coward was a charmer.
As a writer he was brahma.
Velvet jackets and pyjamas,
"the gay divorce" and other dramas.

There ain't half been some clever bastards
(Lucky bleeders, lucky bleeders)
There ain't half been some clever bas-tards.

Van Gough did some eyeball pleasers.
He must have been a pencil squeezer.
He didn't do the Mona Lisa,
That was an Italian geezer.

There ain't half been some clever bastards
(Lucky bleeders, lucky bleeders)
There ain't half been some clever bas-tards.

Einstein can't be classed as witless.
He claimed atoms were the littlest.
When you did a bit of splitting-em-ness
Frighten everybody shitless

There ain't half been some clever bastards.
Probably got help from their mum
(who had help from her mum).
There ain't half been some clever bastards.
Now that we've had some,
let's hope that there's lots more to come.

There ain't half been some clever bastards
(Lucky bleeders, lucky bleeders)
There ain't half been some clever bas-tards.

Okey-dokey!
Oh!
Segovia.
Da-laa la-laa da-daa da-lee
De dump di dump de dump-dump-diddle li-lee.

There ain't half been some clever bastards
(Lucky bleeders, lucky bleeders)
There ain't half been some clever bastards
(Lucky bleeders, lucky bleeders)
There ain't half been some clever bastards
(Lucky bleeders, lucky bleeders)
There ain't half been some clever........
..................................bastards.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Apr, 2013 05:11 am
@izzythepush,
It takes all sorts izzy.
 

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