10
   

Any takers of CoQ10 here?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 05:43 pm
@Linkat,
I don't know about the socks, but his wife might.
He and she and I are friends.
They tolerate my lack of intellectual ingots.

JL, would you mind if I posted that photo Dys took of you a few years ago?

boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 05:49 pm
@hawkeye10,
Oh! That's a much better deal. Thanks!

300mg is a big dose, isn't it?
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 06:35 pm
@boomerang,
Quote:
/300mg is a big dose, isn't it?.

Quote:

Coenzyme Q10 is the third most popular supplement on the market today. If you're wondering how much CoQ10 you should take, this article will help you get an idea of what's right for you.

Depending on why you're taking CoQ10, the amount you'll want to take will be different. If you're taking it for a specific condition, you may need to experiment with different amounts of the supplement until your symptoms improve.

Research has shown that 1200mg per day is safe and even as high as 3600mg per day is tolerated well by most people, but in most cases it's not necessary to take that much and the higher the amount taken the higher the likelihood of mild side effects like diarrhea and nausea.

For migraines, one study found that only 15mg of CoQ10 was enough to reduce 61% of patients' migraines by 50%.

A 2002 study found that 1400mg per day slowed the progression of Parkinson's disease by 44%.

Researchers have found that 200-600mg per day of CoQ10 is beneficial for people suffering with chronic fatigue.

Several studies have shown benefits for people with congestive heart failure at levels as low as 30mg per day. Other studies have found improvements in heart function in amounts between 100mg and 200mg.

If you're just taking CoQ10 for its overall health benefits and not for any specific condition, 30-100mg per day is a good place to start. Many of the available CoQ10 supplements come in 100mg tablets.

CoQ10 may interfere with certain drugs so it is important to check with a doctor or pharmacist before adding CoQ10 to your daily supplement regimen.

http://www.healthdiaries.com/eatthis/recommended-coq10-dosage.html
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 07:08 pm
@boomerang,
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5145XRDSWEL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
I use Nature Made--I get it at CVS or Walgreens, and only buy it when it is buy one, get one free, and they have that deal quite often.

I'm not taking it for any specific reason. I increased the dose gradually. I think I originally started with 30mg, then went to 60 mg, then to 100mg. And I'm not going any higher. I haven't noticed any change in energy level.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 07:20 pm
Okay, this was REALLY stupid of me...

I did read the box (and put it in the recycling which was picked up today) and I looked for a package insert (none) and now I've looked at the bottle several times and nowhere have I seen anything other than "take 2 teaspoons before, during or after a meal". There is nothing about dosage on the bottle label.

I don't have a clue about how many milligrams of anything I ingested the AM.

I've tried google but have come up empty handed. I think my search terms must be lacking (and I'm pretty good at google).

It's 2 tsp. Qunol Co Q 10 Liquid. Help!
sozobe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 07:36 pm
@boomerang,
Looks like 100 mg:

Quote:
Coenzyme Q10 (USP Grade) 100mg


http://www.qunol.com/qunol-products-catalog/qunol-liquid
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 07:40 pm
@sozobe,
Thank you!
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:46 pm
There's apparently a quality/effectiveness difference between ubiquinol and ubiquinone, both of which are called coq10. Boomer's product contains ubiquinol (reduced coq10 and supposedly more potent/effective) which may explain the $$$ differences between some of the products.

Quote:
Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) exists in three redox states, fully oxidized (ubiquinone), partially reduced (semiquinone or ubisemiquinone), and fully reduced (ubiquinol). ...

Ubiquinol is a potent lipophilic antioxidant capable of regenerating other antioxidants such as tocopherol (Vitamin E) and ascorbate (Vitamin C). Recent studies also reveal function in gene expression involved in human cell signaling, metabolism and transport....

Ubiquinol is the antioxidant form of CoQ10 and is essential for mitochondrial synthesis of energy. It is the only known lipid-soluble antioxidant that is endogenously synthesized, protecting biological membranes against lipid peroxidation as well as regenerating other antioxidants such as Vitamin C and Vitamin E. Published clinical and experimental research shows that ubiquinol affects cardiovascular health, neuronal metabolism, renal health, and genes related to lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and inflammation.Wiki
joanne001
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 04:18 am
@boomerang,
CoQ10 is also called as ubiquinone because it belongs to a class of compounds called quinones, and because it’s ubiquitous in living organisms, especially in the heart, liver, and kidneys. It may help treat, or possibly prevent, heart disease, hypertension, Parkinson’s disease, certain cancers. However, research is still going on to uncover a range of potential benefits.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 09:14 am
@JPB,
Some studies have found that the delivery system-i.e. powder form vs oil/lipid delivery systems--is the single most important factor in determining the bioavailabilty of CoQ10.
http://www.usana.com/media/File/dotCom/company/science/crb/UbiquinoneVersusUbiquinol.pdf

Some of the cheaper supplements may use the powdered form of ubiquinone in capsules, but the more expensive brands use liquid/soft gel capsules which deliver the ubiquinone with an oil/lipid.
Quote:
Soft-gel capsules with CoQ10 in oil suspension

A successful approach was to use the emulsion system to facilitate absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and to improve bioavailability. Emulsions of soybean oil (lipid microspheres) could be stabilised very effectively by lecithin and were utilised in the preparation of soft gelatine capsules. In one of the first such attempts, Ozawa et al. performed a pharmacokinetic study on beagle dogs in which the emulsion of CoQ10 in soybean oil was investigated; about two times higher plasma CoQ10 level than that of the control tablet preparation was determined during administration of a lipid microsphere. Although an almost negligible improvement of bioavailability was observed by Kommuru et al. with oil-based soft-gel capsules in a later study on dogs, the significantly increased bioavailability of CoQ10 was confirmed for several oil-based formulations in most other studies.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coenzyme_Q10#cite_note-32


There really isn't much difference, if any, in cost between the ubquinol type Boomer bought and the soft/liquid gel capsules of ubiquinone the other major manufacturers of supplements, like Nature Made which I've used, have on the market. The big savings, for me, is when I buy them during a BOGO sale--I save about $36 a bottle.

So, I wouldn't bother with ubiquinone supplements in powdered form, but, beyond that, I'm not convinced that there is a significant difference in bioavailability between ubiquinol and ubiquinone which is in an oil/lipid based capsule. There is a tremendous amount of manufacturer's hype about ubiquinol that doesn't seem fully supported by research on humans.

But, if one wants ubiquinol, careful shopping can find it at much lower cost--at places like Amazon-- than the product Boomer bought.
This one, for instance, NutriGold CoQ10, 100mg, 120 Softgels - High Absorption CoQ10 GOLD with Kaneka Q10 is only $16.95--and that would be equivalent to the liquid Boomer bought--same strength, same 2 month supply. And the manufacture makes the same claims for the superiority of this product as the one Boomer bought.
http://www.amazon.com/NutriGold-CoQ10-100mg-120-Softgels/dp/B006SA2EMS/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1343401198&sr=8-12&keywords=ubiquinol

For general health, one can always try increasing one's dietary intake of ubiquinone--some foods are much higher in it than others.

hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 10:01 am
@firefly,
If you don't think there is a difference in cost then you have not been paying attention. Nobody beats Costco branded suppliments as a rule. Costco also promises that it has independent labs constantly analysing its products to make sure that the producers are keeping to specs. As you might be aware bottles not containing what the labels say they do is a major problem in the largely unregulated suppliment industry.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 10:20 am
@firefly,
Thank you. Too many decisions sometimes means the same as no decision. This helps.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 10:40 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
If you don't think there is a difference in cost then you have not been paying attention.

I didn't say there was no difference in cost. You can find wide variation in cost--even on identical products offerred on Amazon, depending on the vendor.

What I said was...
Quote:
There really isn't much difference, if any, in cost between the ubquinol type Boomer bought and the soft/liquid gel capsules of ubiquinone the other major manufacturers of supplements, like Nature Made which I've used, have on the market. The big savings, for me, is when I buy them during a BOGO sale--I save about $36 a bottle.


You can save considerably on cost, on almost all supplements, by careful shopping.

I never shop at Costco, but Nature Made is a generally highly regarded brand in most reviews I have read, and it is not cheap, which is why I wait for BOGO sales--I purchase my fish oil supplements that way too, and save about $25 a bottle when I buy them that way.

Nature Made also asserts that their ingredients have been verified by an independent third-party.
http://www.naturemade.com/about-nature-made/quality

If you're happy with the Costco product, that's fine.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  3  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 10:43 am
I'd rather get it from food -

http://www.livestrong.com/article/85773-natural-sources-coenzyme-q10/

It seems I have been - I eat lots of these items, including the mackeral fish cakes I make.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 11:24 am
@ossobuco,
I was channel flipping on TV the other day and came across the Dr. Oz show. The segment I saw was about cancer fighting foods and his guest was quickly going through the foods one should eat, and the amounts they should eat.

It amounted to this:

1 cup cooked lima beans every day
1/2 cup fresh chopped parsley ever day
1/2 cup (might have been 1 cup) fresh lime juice every day
7 apricots every day

I sat there thinking this was really some strange advice in that I don't know of anyone who could maintain that diet for more than a couple of days.

I like to get my nutrients from food too but some of the amounts required to get any benefit are really unreasonable. That's why I take vitamins.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 11:52 am
@boomerang,
That sounds like about a years supply of lima beans and parsely
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 12:09 pm
@roger,
No kidding!

I wonder what adding that list of foods to your daily diet would cost. Has anyone priced limes lately? Outrageous!

I've never watched that Dr. Oz show before because the guy kind of creeps me out. I've read his column in the paper a few times and his advice always strikes me as being geared towards the pampered millionaire.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 12:18 pm
@boomerang,
I am very hard to sell on suppliments because I believe that if you eat a well rounded diet you will be fine on almost everything all the time. I do though take fish oil, CoQ10 and a joint suppliment. I got sold on the joint stuff back arounf 1995 when while in Germany we had a newfoundland with hip problems. The vet put her on these suppliments and they were like a miricle. I started to use after a knee injury around 2001 that I was stupid about treating so I damaged the knee perminently. For weeks I could barely get on it till I remembered this
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 12:36 pm
@boomerang,
I've watched it from time to time (where I had found out about mangosteen) - I would take what he teaches or shows on there with a grain of salt. In other words, one show he is telling you to eat 10 pounds of parsley and it will cure any disease and then the next show tells you mangosteen is the power food.

Not that I think he is giving wrong information - but maybe over simplifying it and maybe there are different views. I heard on his show about arsenic levels in apple juice - how it was poisioning our children. Although his report wasn't "wrong" there is arsenic - he claimed it was potentially toxic - whereas the CDC criticized Oz’s coverage of this issue, stating: “Mehmet, I’m very upset about this, I think that this was extremely irresponsible. It reminds me of yelling fire in a movie theater.”

So - Dr. Oz is basically part of hollywood and I'd take his reports as such.

0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 12:53 pm
Well - I just happen to have cooked up a batch of dried baby lima beans in my crock pot recently. I'll just call them lima beans adovado. I freeze beans of various kinds for soups, so I eat a bunch of beans a week, but nothing like a cup a day. Yesterday I mixed the beans with some thawed tomato concoction of mine, some homemade pork sausage bits, some garlic, and some broken up spaghetti pieces, and a little this and that re spices. It came out rather like the way I make pasta fagioli, except the beans weren't all blended in. It's good - but I'll freeze the rest, no interest in eating that for many days in a row.

First time I made pasta fagioli I thought it was so great I had two big bowls. No, I didn't poop explosively (what a thought), but I did get a sense of kind of a dried out and thirsty gastrointestinal tract - literally thirsty, and the feeling went away when I kept sipping a lot of water.

Yeah, I've priced limes lately.

Something said on those food and CoQ10 sites I looked at was that you get best benefit from the raw items, that cooking affects CoQ, so overdone meat is not that good. Meantime, it is hard to order a medium rare burger here in Abq, because none of the places I eat at grind their own good beef (or have a good butcher fresh grind it), which is very unlikely to have bad escherichia coli bacteria, and since they all likely use prepackaged patties, they're wary of processed patties E. coli dangers and lawsuits.

When I make my mackerel fishcakes, I use canned mackerel and potatoes and some cracker crumbs, and egg, and some spices, and saute the fishcake well enough but not to a burny stage, as the potatoes and mackerel are already cooked and it's just the egg that matters. Salmon's on the list, and I make salmon cakes too. But re raw - walnuts are on the list (yippee!)
 

Related Topics

Immortality and Doctor Volkov - Discussion by edgarblythe
Sleep Paralysis - Discussion by Nick Ashley
On the edge and toppling off.... - Discussion by Izzie
Surgery--Again - Discussion by Roberta
PTSD, is it caused by a blow to the head? - Question by Rickoshay75
THE GIRL IS ILL - Discussion by Setanta
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.07 seconds on 06/20/2021 at 01:56:31