MontereyJack
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 01:12 am
Ain't it sweet.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  4  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 06:39 am
McCaskill Defeats Akin in Missouri

Sen. Claire McCaskill has won re-election in Missouri, holding off Rep. Todd Akin who came under fire for saying women had ways of preventing pregnancies in the case of "legitimate rape."

McCaskill's victory denies Republicans a seat they'd hoped to pick up before Akin's comments.

Democrats have picked up two Senate seats from the Republicans — Elizabeth Warren in Massachusetts and Joe Donnelly in Indiana — while the GOP has lost three seats, including to an independent in Maine.

As of 10:45 p.m. Eastern time, Democrats had locked up 45 seats, Republicans 42, including 67 seats not up for election. Democrats now hold a 53-seat majority, including two independents who align with them.

http://news.yahoo.com/mccaskill-defeats-akin-missouri-035535912.html
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 06:47 am

(victory fist-bump...)
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 06:49 am
@Region Philbis,
he was a douche...

I'm just a little less embarrassed to live next door to misery now.

I'd like to hear 2packs opinion of it...
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 06:57 am
What Happened to the Tea Party (and the Blue Dogs?)



Some of the Republican Party‘s most controversial House members are clinging to narrow leads in races where only a few votes are left to count.

Rep. Michele Bachmann, the chairwoman of the Tea Party Caucus, led by almost 2,300 votes with 84 percent of precincts reporting as of early this morning. That race is still too close to call and shifted back and forth all night long.

Rep. Allen West of Florida, one of the most outspoken Republicans in the House of Representatives, trailed Patrick Murphy by fewer than 3,000 votes with all precincts reporting. The race is still too close to call, according both to ABC News and the Associated Press, but barring surprises, West looks poised to lose.

The Democratic Party of Florida has already released a statement: “We congratulate Congressman-elect Patrick Murphy on defeating tea party crony Allen West,” said Rod Smith, the chair of the Florida Democratic Party. “Tonight, the people of this district rejected divisive, hateful rhetoric in favor a fresh-faced, bipartisan approach centered around the issues important to Florida’s middle class families.”

Most of the other freshmen Republicans from 2010 were able to hold on to their seats. Of 87 Republican freshmen, just nine have lost their bids for a second term at last count. There is a common perception that the freshman class was stocked with tea partyers, but just 19 of 87 GOP freshmen joined the Tea Party Caucus after the 2010 landslide. Two freshmen Democrats, Reps. Mark Critz of Pennsylvania and Kathy Hochul of western New York, also lost.

Of the 60 members of the Tea Party Caucus, 46 have already clinched victory. Four others, including Bachmann and West, remain in races too close to call. Six Tea Party caucus members were defeated at the polls, plus another seven who retired, lost a primary or sought higher office. Both tea party candidates who ran for the Senate, Reps. Denny Rehberg of Montana and Todd Akin of Missouri lost, while Rep. Mike Pence won his bid for governor of Indiana.

Blue Dog Democrats also saw their numbers shrink from 24 to 15, including six members who retired, sought higher office, or were defeated in primaries earlier this year. Reps. Ben Chandler, Larry Kissell, and Leonard Boswell all lost Tuesday.

One Blue Dog, Rep. Jim Matheson of Utah, fended off an intense challenge from Mia Love, a small-town mayor who was running to become the first black woman Republican elected to Congress. With 100 percent of the precincts reporting, Matheson defeated Love by nearly 3,000 votes. She issued a statement offering her congratulations to Matheson early Tuesday morning.

“Congratulations to Jim on a hard fought victory,” Love said. “It was a close race, but ultimately the voters of Utah have spoken.”


http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2012/11/what-happened-to-the-tea-party-and-the-blue-dogs/


(crossing my fingers that wackjob Bachmann gets the old heave ho)
parados
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 07:53 am
@Rockhead,
It looks like Bachmann is leading by about 1%. An automatic recall would take place if it was .5%. At this point the challenger Jim Graves is deciding whether to ask for a recount or not trailing by roughly 3,900 votes out of 355,000 cast. A recount is not likely to overturn it. Bachmann had a 12 to 1 advantage in spending but barely won a squeaker.
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 07:59 am
@parados,
she's a frootloop.

at least she provides some comic relief.

and doesn't represent my state...
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 07:59 am
@parados,
Interesting note in Bachmann's district.

Romney/Ryan got 206148 votes - Obama - 151900
Bachmann got 179653 votes. - challenger Jim Graves - 175716

I guess she is starting to wear a little thin in her fairly heavy GOP district.
0 Replies
 
NSFW (view)
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 08:48 am
@joefromchicago,
Eew.

That'll teach me not to click on "NSFW."
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 08:53 am
@DrewDad,
Oooh, awesome! I didn't know there was a NSFW filter for individual posts.

For those of you at work, my post shows a naked Mitt Romney having wild monkey sex with a bound-and-gagged Karl Rove while yelling "you promised me Ohio!"
parados
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 09:31 am
@joefromchicago,
I'm just sorry I looked before I read your description.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  0  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 10:47 am
Skimming through the demographics it looks as if the influence of whites is on the decline. So also the influence of men. As is the case with earners above $50,000. City dwellers are on the up. So are the young.

And marijuana legalisation got its foot in the door.

The Republicans can either tack left or sit tight and wait for the liberal consensus to implode.
Miller
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 10:51 am
@spendius,
spendius wrote:

Skimming through the demographics it looks as if the influence of whites is on the decline. So also the influence of men. As is the case with earners above $50,000. City dwellers are on the up. So are the young.

And marijuana legalisation got its foot in the door.

The Republicans can either tack left or sit tight and wait for the liberal consensus to implode.


The backlash has already started.
DrewDad
 
  7  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 12:13 pm
@Miller,
Miller wrote:
The backlash has already started.

You mean the sour grapes and "I'll take my ball and go home!" petulance?

Who ever doubted it?
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 12:20 pm
@DrewDad,
They probably didnt' listen to Romney's speech last night about cooperation for our country. They're like children who wants to be the bully just because they lost.

It's probably good that they remain the No Party for the next four years to show how much damage they are willing to do to our country. The financial cliff facing us will be a good test of their resolve. Another gridlock will only show they don't belong in our government.

They're between a rock and a hard place; their future lies in what they do to resolve differences or bankrupt this country.

spendius
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 01:28 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Do you mean that a majority of the House and a substantial minority of the Senate "don't belong" in your Government?

That sounds like you want a One-Party State. All blue. You should be investigated for unAmerican activities.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 01:47 pm
@spendius,
I never ever suggested such idiocy. Go back to the pub to drink where your buddies will understand wtf you're talking about.
spendius
 
  0  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 01:57 pm
@cicerone imposter,
You did indeed.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 02:05 pm
The Republicans Bet Everything, and Obama Won It All

Quote:
["High risk, high reward."] That is the approach the entire Republican Party has taken in almost every situation it has found itself since 2008. Republicans greeted Barack Obama’s presidency with a calculated wave of total opposition. They would not cut a deal on health care or on the federal budget, each time accepting the risk of total defeat rather than settling for half-measures, like giving Democrats some kind of token health care reform or small tax increase.

The gamble was that by denying Obama any support, they would render his presidency wholly partisan at best, and a dysfunctional failure at worst. They would increase their own chances of denying him a second term, and that their return to power would allow them to claim a full and absolute break with the past. They shoved all their chips onto tonight’s election. When the networks called it at 11:15 p.m., the totality of the right’s failure was clear. And because they bid up the stakes as high as they could, their loss was unusually devastating.

The gamble was not totally crazy, I have argued, because 2012 may have been the last chance to enact an undiluted conservative agenda. The electorate is driving steadily leftward, with the oldest voters representing the GOP’s strongest constituency, and the youngest voters its weakest. Every four years, a new 18–22-year-old cohort arrives that is more liberal than the one that has died off in the interim. The Republicans face a double peril with the youth vote. A far lower proportion of young voters are white, and those who are white are far less likely than their parents or grandparents to vote Republican. White voters over the age of 65 selected Romney by a twenty-point margin. White voters under 30 split evenly.

...

The great gamble failed. It failed for many reasons: The economy recovered just enough in 2012, Mitt Romney ran a mediocre campaign, Obama ran a strong one. Among the most important is a factor conservatives seem to have never reckoned with — their party has never recovered the public’s trust.

...

Democrats will not keep winning forever. (In particular, their heavy reliance on young and non-white voters, who vote more sporadically, will subject the party to regular drubbings in midterm elections, when only the hardiest voters turn out.) Eventually, the Republican Party will recast and reform itself, and the Democratic Party’s disparate constituencies will eat each other alive, as they tend to do when they lack the binding force of imminent peril. But conservatives have lost their best chance to strike down the Obama legacy and mold the government in the Paul Ryan image. “There is nothing more exhilarating,” Churchill once said, “than to be shot at without result.”


Links, images, and additional commentary in the original.
 

Related Topics

Why Romney Lost - Discussion by IRFRANK
Route to the sea. - Question by raprap
Two bad moments for Romney in second debate - Discussion by maxdancona
Romney vs. Big Bird - Discussion by maxdancona
Mitt Romney, the bane of Sesame Street - Discussion by DrewDad
It looks like it's Paul Ryan!!! - Discussion by maxdancona
Who will be Romney's running mate? - Discussion by Robert Gentel
When will Romney quit the race? - Discussion by edgarblythe
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Romney 2012?
  3. » Page 163
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.06 seconds on 05/09/2021 at 02:53:25