2
   

83% of Doctors May Quit

 
 
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 08:38 am
http://townhall.com/tipsheet/katehicks/2012/06/14/thanks_obamacare_83_of_doctors_surveyed_say_they_may_quit

Quote:

The Doctor Patient Medical Association has released a new survey of about 700 doctors, and the results are bleak. Scary bleak. Among other dismal figures, Doctors' Attitudes on the Future of Medicine: What’s Wrong, Who’s to Blame, and What Will Fix It found that 83% of respondents are contemplating leaving the industry if Obamacare is fully implemented, owing to its disastrous projected consequences. Indeed, they openly blame the healthcare law for their industry's woes:

KEY FINDINGS

  • 90% say the medical system is on the WRONG TRACK
  • 83% say they are thinking about QUITTING
  • 61% say the system challenges their ETHICS
  • 85% say the patient-physician relationship is in a TAILSPIN
  • 65% say GOVERNMENT INVOLVEMENT is most to blame for current problems
  • 72% say individual insurance mandate will NOT result in improved access care
  • 49% say they will STOP accepting Medicaid patients
  • 74% say they will STOP ACCEPTING Medicare patients, or leave Medicare completely
  • 52% say they would rather treat some Medicaid/Medicare patient for FREE
  • 57% give the AMA a FAILING GRADE representing them
  • 1 out of 3 doctors is HESITANT to voice their opinion
  • 2 out of 3 say they are JUST SQUEAKING BY OR IN THE RED financially
  • 95% say private practice is losing out to CORPORATE MEDICINE
  • 80% say DOCTORS/MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS are most likely to help solve things
  • 70% say REDUCING GOVERNMENT would be single best fix.

If this isn't an airtight argument for the repeal of Obamacare, nothing is. When the people providing the actual healthcare are thinking of getting out of the game, the system is clearly broken. Here's hoping the Supreme Court strikes down Obamacare this month.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 2,240 • Replies: 23
No top replies

 
parados
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 08:49 am
@gungasnake,
Wow...

100% of Conservatives prove they are too stupid to know the difference between a scientific poll and a survey.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 10:06 am
@gungasnake,
100% of doctors will eventually stop practicing medicine....
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 10:12 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:

http://townhall.com/tipsheet/katehicks/2012/06/14/thanks_obamacare_83_of_doctors_surveyed_say_they_may_quit

Quote:
If this isn't an airtight argument for the repeal of Obamacare, nothing is.


According to this logic, then, there isn't an airtight argument for the repeal of the healthcare act.

Doctors are trained to treat patients. They're as fallible as anyone else when it comes to making national policy.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 10:21 am
@gungasnake,
Good lord. No significant description of how the survey was conducted, or where they obtained the fax numbers for the doctors. How can anyone have faith that it was a random sample?

This thing just stinks to high heaven.
nqyringmind
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 10:33 am
@gungasnake,
Survey says:
McDonald's must be the best burger joint in the world because they feed 46 million people daily.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 10:35 am
Guys, Townhall is a conservative shill site. This is the link line found at the bottom of every page at their site:

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So whenever you see Gunga Dim posting some drek from Townhall, just remember it's Fantasy Land for tea baggers.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 10:39 am
@DrewDad,
http://www.dpmafoundation.org/physician-attitudes-on-medicine.html

They sent out over 16,000 faxes and got less than 700 back. It wasn't scientific at all. And if you look at the comments, they included chiropractors in their sample. (I am sure there can be debate as to whether they are actually Dr.s or not.)

Based on the questions, it was a push survey that would have got the responses from those that agreed with it.


I particularly like this comment but I have no idea what he means. It must be Dr-ese.

Quote:
Obamacare will be the ultimate of the solo practioner and small practices
- Dermatologist, MO
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 10:40 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnaKKKe wrote:
Quote:

The Doctor Patient Medical Association has released a new survey of about 700 doctors, and the results are bleak....


I'm not surprised.

Quote:
The Doctor Patient Medical Association (DPMA) and the Patient Power Alliance (PPA) work to repeal health care reform and call themselves a "a nonpartisan association of doctors and patients dedicated to preserving free choice in medicine." The organization is a member of the National Tea Party Federation and the "American Grassroots Coalition."

The DPMA is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). DPMA Chair and Co-Founder, Kathryn Serkes, is on ALEC's Health and Human Services Task Force.

Source
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 11:34 am
They also are tied to the American Association of Physicians and Surgeons, who publish occasionally a non-peer-reviewed journal notable chiefly for publishing a deeply flawed anti-climate-change article by some of the nutball "scientists" associated with the Pacific Research Institute, an essentially nonexistent "scientific" organization, whose proud boast is that they have an electron microscope, apparenly their only equipment, one of whose founders is also a co-founder. "Fringe" overstates their legitimacy.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 12:03 pm
Yes, I can see 83 percents or 1o percent or 5 percents for that matter quiting and going to work at some job without that the income or the social standing after spending decades getting the title of doctor in front of their names.

Oh doctors cry about Medicare in the 60s going into effect and then got rich from that program.
gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 02:27 pm
@BillRM,
People become doctors for differing reasons, but money is not usually one of them. There are too many simpler and easier ways to make money and most doctors come from families of independent means to begin with. They have lots of choices and not too many of them are going to keep at it beyond the day that Bork Obunga makes the profession too painful to want to deal with.
parados
 
  0  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 02:43 pm
@BillRM,
Based on the numbers, it would be 83% of 2% of Doctors may quit.

Dang.. that's almost 2% of doctors that might quit.
And of those 40% are nearing retirement age.
Dang.. 83% of those doctors nearing retirement age may actually quit their jobs.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 03:01 pm
Remember kids, four out of five doctors is not a statistically signiicant sample . . .
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 03:13 pm
@gungasnake,
Quote:
There are too many simpler and easier ways to make money and most doctors come from families of independent means to begin with.


LOL not the doctors I had known or the one doctor I used to date and most of them have debts in the many many hundreds of thousands at the end of their training.

Off to google,,,,,,,,,,,INDEPENDENT MEANS INDEED!!!!!!!!

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/28/the-hidden-costs-of-medical-student-debt/

The Hidden Costs of Medical Student Debt
Doctor and Patient |
By PAULINE W. CHEN, M.D.| July 28, 2011, 12:01 am 105 Comments
.
iHe was a senior surgeon many of us in training wanted to emulate — smart, busy and beloved by patients and staff. But we loved him most because he could have been any one of us. He had slogged through the same training program some 15 years earlier, and he had survived.

I caught up with him one afternoon during my internship, hoping to glean some wisdom, but all he could talk about was how he was going to be seeing patients less and focusing on his dream of improving hospital quality and efficiency. “Don’t get me wrong,” he said. “I love caring for patients.” But the stress of keeping a practice afloat was wearing him down.

“Plus the monkey is finally off my back now,” he said with an enormous grin. “I paid off my last student loan.”

.
My heart dropped. That the specter of student loan payments would loom over my life for at least another decade and a half was utterly disheartening.

But absolutely true. It wasn’t until my early 40s that I paid off my last loan.

For almost three generations, debt has been a nearly inescapable part of becoming a doctor. Over 80 percent of each medical student class will graduate in debt; and while that percentage has remained unchanged for 25 years, the increase in the total amount owed has leapfrogged over all other economic reality checks, like inflation and the consumer price index. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, which has been trying to address the problem for nearly a decade, young doctors who graduated from medical school last year had an average debt of $158,000, or $2.3 billion for the group as a whole. Almost a third of students owed more than $200,000, a number that will only increase with the addition of interest over payback periods of 25 to 30 years.

The skyrocketing costs are primarily due to the expansion and increasing complexity of universities and academic medical centers, and to the trend among university administrators to use tuition to support institutional projects that may be only indirectly linked to medical student education.

But while upgraded clinical facilities and spectacular research programs are obvious reasons, another key factor has gone largely unnoticed. It is our society’s assumption that individual indebtedness is required to obtain big-ticket items, whether they are cars, houses or higher education.

“It’s become normal now to take out loans to get anything of value,” said Dr. S. Ryan Greysen, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and lead author of a fascinating study published this month on the historical and social factors that have contributed to rising medical student indebtedness. “Getting a medical education has become similar to getting a mortgage on your house.”

The acceptance of student indebtedness as the “norm” of medical school has provided a kind of carte blanche for robust tuition increases. Median yearly tuition at public medical schools is $29,000, and at private institutions it is $47,000 — increases from two decades earlier of over 312 percent and 165 percent, respectively. While some may counter that future doctors can well afford such increases and loans, the rising debt load has had and will have repercussions on patients, particularly those in greatest need.

izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 01:04 pm
This fearmongering nonsense by the rich and powerful is nothing new. We had the same bluster over here when the NHS was established, and the Tories talked of widespread unemployment when Labour introduced the minimum wage. Neither of which came true.

At the end of the day I'd rather be treated by someone who was motivated by a desire to treat the sick, not to get obscenely rich.

Quote:
As far as the hospital service was concerned, the new proposals went a long way to meet the desires of the medical profession and the voluntary hospital movement. The doctors had feared a salaried service, with loss of clinical freedom. This risk had been averted, and to the avid socialist Bevan’s scheme appeared almost reactionary. The voluntary hospitals had looked for a way to preserve their independence, though dependent on public funds. They had therefore opposed local authority control, seeking instead partnership on a management body alongside the representatives of local government. This had been achieved. A regional solution was in sight, within which university hospitals would have a special place. Indeed the British Hospitals Association wrote to Bevan that ‘so far as concerns the arrangements for the general administration and financing of the service we are satisfied that a substantial measure of common ground is already in sight’.


http://www.nhshistory.net/bevan.htm
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 01:12 pm
@BillRM,
OK, that I didn't know and if true amounts to a sea change from when I was in school which was the last I took any notice of medical students and how they lived, serious debt problems were not part of the picture at that time.

Nonetheless I did have the part about there being easier ways to make money right and I have no reason to doubt the poll in the article. If the supreme court does not get rid of Obungacare and a Romney administration is not able to get rid of it, health care in this land is going to suffer.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 01:23 pm
The size of Obungacare indicates to me that it is about power and not about health care. Likewise Mark Steyn notes that the job of director or head of public health has become the biggest govt. job in most European countries, i.e. it would be a step upwards from PM or President to head of health care. In other words, European health care is ultimate bureaucracy.

If I had the power to I would institute a sort of a basic health care reform which would be overwhelmingly simple and which would resemble Obungacare in no way, shape, or manner. Key points would be:

1. Elimination of lawsuits against doctors and other medical providers. There would be a general fund to compensate victims of malpractice for actual damage and a non-inbred system for weeding out those guilty of malpractice.

2. Elimination of the artificial exclusivity of the medical system. In other words our medical schools could easily produce two or three times the number of doctors they do with no noticeable drop off in quality.

3. Elimination of the various practices which drive the cost of medicines towards unaffordability. Again a large part of that is lawsuits and the insane costs of bringing a new drug to market.

4. Elimination of the outmoded WW-II notion of triage in favor of a system which took some rational account of who pays for the system and who doesn't. The horror stories I keep reading about the middle-class guy with an injured child having to fill out forms for three hours while an endless procession of illegal immigrants just walks in and are seen would end, as would any possibility of that child waiting three hours for treatment while people were being seen for heroin overdoses.

5. Elimination of whatever goes into people using emergency rooms as their basic care provider systems.

All of those things would fall under the heading of what TR called "trust busting". There would also be some system for caring for the truly indigent, but the need and cost would be far less than at present.

By far the biggest item is that first one. The trial lawyers' guild being one of the two major pillars of financial support for the democrat party is the basic reason nobody is saying anything about that part of the problem.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 04:00 pm
Today, many PCPs are refusing to treat Medicare/Medicaid patients. The same is true for hospital admissions. Many are not taking Medicare or Medicaid insurance.

Some ERs in the Boston area have closed because of the lack of private insurance-paying customers.

How will Obama remedy this sorrow situation?
parados
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 04:14 pm
@Miller,
Quote:

Some ERs in the Boston area have closed because of the lack of private insurance-paying customers.

Interesting that you don't blame Romneycare for the Mass medical system.
 

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