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RACISM IN "WHITE" AMERICA

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 06:15 am
@Setanta,
mmmmmm ham salad. I havent had a good hamm salad sammich since Reagan was the governor.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 06:47 am
@farmerman,
The Rapid "Hispanitization" of the US will be an interesting experiment about how racism morphs into something else. I remember as a kid, my Russian grandfather was unable to cope with "All the wops whove moved in around his comfortable Russian ghetto ". He considered Italians as inferirors based upon some minor but still detectable, skin difference. Today, most all of those first generation Eastern European and Mediterranean types are dead and the second to third genberations are all fled to suburbia along with blacks and recently, Hispanics
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 07:49 am
I worked with a man from Mexico, until several months ago. He had a green card and achieved his GED while we were together. We started out as the best of friends. But, he gradually changed toward me. Some of it was due to my closeness with the boss, but the racism factor seems also at play. One of my grandsons is half Mexican. His Mexican grandmother and her two daughters ran the daycare center across the street. My wife worked for this other grandmother. My coworker enrolled his son there. Well, the grandson in question now lives in Denver. The MG (Mexican grandmother) turns out only hired my wife to have a funnel of information about the grandson. She tried unsuccessfully to pump information about my daughter and the boy. When my wife balked at being so used, the MG decided to get rid of her. She began writing her up for infractions manufactured by her and her daughters, until my wife had to leave. When I related some of the conflict to my coworker, he took the MG's side, saying that I likely tell these things because I don't like the lady (misreporting the facts, was the inference).

Not many months later, I told my coworker about the lawless, shifteless bunch living across the street from me. After he listened a few minutes, he asked me, "Are they Mexican?" They were not Mexican, but I saw where he was going.

After this man left the job for good, he stayed in touch with my other coworker, plus some of the people living where I work, but he avoids me. Much of it relates to his anger over getting fired and my closeness with the boss, but I am apparently marked as anti Mexican.

I can write him off, but the allegations against me are a bother. But, you cannot please everybody.
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wayne
 
  2  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 08:02 am
I understand quite well that racism still exists, and see more than a little in my daily life. I do, however, believe that America is a strong force for the good in this respect. The opportunity is there for each of us to do our part in our daily lives.

I had an interesting experience, a few years ago, which demonstrated the power of simple human connections.
My farmer friend and I needed an extra hand loading out a semi with small bales one day, we were able to borrow a man from a larger farming operation.
When we arrived to pick up our help, the man turned out to be an Hispanic immigrant, of indeterminate status, who spoke not a word of English.
We three started off in the pick-up with nods and a sense of mutual discomfort, until I remembered a bit of my miniscule repertoire of high school Spanish. I looked the man in the eye and uttered, se llamo? He responded with a huge smile and the name Hector. My friend and I then gave our names, along with our own huge smiles, and the rest of the day we all communicated with nods, smiles, and a lot of finger pointing. It turned out that Hector was an able hand and names and smiles were all we needed.
I saw no racism that day.

I've not seen Hector again, but the power of that small human connection was not lost on me that day. I believe, in time, the human connection will win out over racism and bigotry in America.
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 09:17 am
@Tabludama,
I bet setanta has criticised Clarence Thomas, Herman Cain, Louis Farrakhan and at least a few other black persons.
snood
 
  3  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 09:34 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

I bet setanta has criticised Clarence Thomas, Herman Cain, Louis Farrakhan and at least a few other black persons.


Anybody want to try to make the case that Setanta has been easy on me because I'm black, or always agreed with me, or any nonsense like that?
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 09:38 am
@snood,
I thought about that, but did not want to stir the pot.
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snood
 
  3  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 09:55 am
@edgarblythe,
I respect that kind of self-restraint in you, ed. but I don't see this Tabludummy dude as worth any extra effort keeping boats un-rocked, you know?
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 09:57 am
@snood,
I am seeing now that the guy merely wants to pick a quarrel, rather than engage in exchange of thoughts.
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Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 12:49 pm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LiberalismLiberalism (from the Latin liberalis, "of freedom")[1] is the belief in the importance of liberty and equal rights.[2] Liberals espouse a wide array of views depending on their understanding of these principles, but generally, liberals support ideas such as constitutionalism, liberal democracy, free and fair elections, human rights, capitalism, and freedom of religion.[3][4][5][6][7] These ideas are widely accepted, even by political groups that do not openly profess a liberal ideological orientation. Liberalism encompasses several intellectual trends and traditions, but the dominant variants are classical liberalism, which became popular in the eighteenth century, and social liberalism, which became popular in the twentieth century.

The above pretty much states what I as a liberal believe. I'm sorry racist find human rights, freedom of religion, fair elections et al.. a dirty word. It doesn't affect me none. Keep using the word as a smear. I'll then use the tried and true to describe the likes of you and your ilk. Words like close minded, fundamentalist, ignorant... are pretty apt. What you see as pc is the world I'd like to live in, but I keep brushing up against low life scum who poison the water and atmosphere with hate, bigotry and venom.
So keep using the word liberal. I'll wear it with pride. I'll assume you'll wear my words with pride as well...
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 01:34 pm
@Lash,
Lash. I read this a bit ago and it caught my ear..
well, first of all, when I originally read about Cisneros it was re her insistance on having a purple house in a designated heritage protected part of town (San Antonio?). I've not read anything by her but like her gumption/flare (not sure if I agree with her or not on that, have gone back and forth and back and forth, my libertarian side with my fondness for older architecture and its ways. I've messed some of it up myself rather righteously).

I've been doing a mix of household stuff, and started mulling about you and your class and Sandra Cisneros.. and Malaetele. Good, the openness of both of you.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 01:42 pm
@snood,
Snort...
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ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 02:07 pm
On bigotry, some fair part of the package is how we were raised and who the people we associate with are. I was raised oddly isolated, only child in a family that moved a lot - so my associates were pretty much my parents. Looking now at their biases, if I had followed them, who would I be? Well, I'd distrust protestants but not jews, we being irish american catholics with later roots in hollywood. Nothing about race. (Talking particularly about my mother here; she born in Boston 1901). Later I figured out that she thought Mexico was dirty... that was just before my first of a bunch of travels there. That may have been anti ethnic but I'm not sure - I think it was more re the country, because I remember her liking my early classmates and their mothers.. the ones she liked being mexican american.

I have a personal view over my lifetime observation that the east coast u.s. is more class oriented than the west, but of course that is anecdotal and is probably only about my own version of the west. But, not for nothing do I call my Boston family lace curtain irish. This may be related to the fact that I've been odd at housekeeping, both creative and on the sloppy side, for many decades.

I'm not like Set in that I don't remember facts from what I read and at the time understand (egads, what a talent, not kidding); it's more that I remember washes from what I read, memory, at least sometimes, of my formed opinions or of envisaged scenes. But I read like a mad child, and, fairly early, people were just people to me.

I don't remember my father disliking anyone except Hoover. He roamed around northern california as a kid, majored in philosophy, and so on, very different background than my mother.
My aunt hated "japs".

I tried in my twenties to talk my then way older aunt out of that - no go.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 02:11 pm
Hey folks, i would ask that you ignore the obsessional racist troll who is now posting in the thread. He can post to his heart's content with his hateful bullshit, but if we respond, we're just feeding him.
Tabludama
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2011 02:17 pm
@Ceili,
Ceili,

You are confusing true liberals like Martin Luther King, JFK, LBJ, and Scoop Jackson with todays leftists who call themselves "liberals" like the racist Al Sharpton, Michael Moore, and Ward Churchill. Although most call themselves "progressives" these days.

True liberals support equal rights and equal justice under law. Martin Luther King's most famous words called for the end of judging people by the color of their skin.

But todays"liberals" support the racist affirmative laws and racial spoils system where qualified people are denied jobs, admission to college, govt contracts, etc, solely based on the color of their skin.

True liberals are as anti communist as they are anti Nazi. Todays "liberals" at the Occupy Wall Street, in many cases, march hand and hand with open Communist Party members and others with anti Semitic signs stereotyping the bankers as Wall Street Jews.

Etc,etc, etc.

Quote:
Keep using the word as a smear. I'll then use the tried and true to describe the likes of you and your ilk. Words like close minded, fundamentalist, ignorant... are pretty apt.


Please note that I put the word, liberal, in quotes signifying that I am talking about todays leftists who call themselves" liberals" not true liberals who are honorable people.. Although, judging from your closed minded, ignorant, quote above, you probably qualify for the quoted version .
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