msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Jul, 2011 09:06 am
@Thomas,
That's interesting, Thomas.
I knew about summer camps in the US (of course), but wasn't aware that politics & religion were a feature of them.

(Which makes me wonder why Glenn Beck found the Labour youth camp in Norway such an abhorrent concept.)
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Jul, 2011 09:15 am
@msolga,
msolga wrote:

Thanks, Walter.

Izzy, you're saying you worked for the Tea Party?


No Silly, I was just using that as an excuse to post a Roger Mellie cartoon. I use Roger as my avatar. He's as representative of me as Felix is of you.
http://images.moviepostershop.com//felix-the-cat-shatters-the-sheik-movie-poster-1926-1010197726.jpg
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Jul, 2011 09:26 am
@izzythepush,
Well phew that's a relief!
I'm really glad you cleared that up! Wink

I'm glad you fixed that cartoon image, too. Good stuff! I like it.
I was wondering where your avatar came from.
Now I know.

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Jul, 2011 09:28 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Thanks, Walter.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Jul, 2011 09:28 am
@msolga,
Viz is a brilliant mix of high brow intellectualism, and schoolboy lavatory humour. Not many things make me laugh out loud, but it does.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Jul, 2011 09:29 am
@Thomas,
Quote:
(Note to self: I need to plug This American Life more often. It's a treasure!)

Thomas, I've been listening to that program.
It does sound good!
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Jul, 2011 09:31 am
@izzythepush,
This is some of the more high brow stuff.

http://www.dom-bescoby.com/uploaded_images/modernparents-716349.jpg
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Jul, 2011 09:43 am
@izzythepush,
Very good! Smile

But now I'm feeling rather guilty because we've strayed so far from the thread subject.

Anyway, nice talking to you.
Way past my bedtime so I'm heading off now.
Good night.

0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Aug, 2011 11:34 pm
Married Lesbian Couple Rescued 40 Teens from Norway Massacre
http://bandofthebes.typepad.com/bandofthebes/2011/07/married-lesbian-couple-rescued-40-teens-from-norway-massacre.html

Reported several times but not in anything I'd call a mainstream English language paper. Wondering why. Not true, or something else? Odd.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2011 04:10 am
@hingehead,
There was a lot on the BBC about how some of the children were rescued by others, I think that couple may well have been included in the reports, but their sexuality wasn't commented on.

I did love this particular phrase,
Quote:
Did they run and hide? No, they're lesbians,
as if that had anything to do with it.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2011 04:33 am
@izzythepush,
There were reports here as well, they were named in the Norwegian media, but all without their sexuality. (Age, might certainly be - especially, when interviewed.)
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2011 04:44 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I think the website has a particular axe to grind, which is understandable considering the levels of homophobia out there, but I don't think their heroism is a result of their sexual preference.
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Mar, 2012 09:45 am
@izzythepush,
Norway Unveils Terrorism Indictment For Massacre
by The Associated Press
March 7, 2012

Norwegian prosecutors on Wednesday indicted Anders Behring Breivik on terror and murder charges in the slaying of 77 people in a bomb and shooting rampage. But they said the confessed mass killer likely won't go to prison for the country's worst peacetime massacre.

Prosecutors said they consider the 33-year-old right-wing extremist psychotic and will seek a sentence of involuntary commitment to psychiatric care instead of imprisonment unless new information about his mental health emerges during the trial set to start in April.

As expected, they charged him under a paragraph in Norway's anti-terror law that refers to violent acts intended to disrupt key government functions or spread fears in the population.

Breivik has confessed to the July 22 attacks but denies criminal guilt, portraying the victims as "traitors" for embracing immigration policies he claims will result in an Islamic colonization of Norway.

Eight people were killed when a bomb exploded in downtown Oslo and another 69 people died in a shooting spree on Utoya island outside the capital, where the youth wing of the governing Labor Party was holding its annual summer camp.

Reading from the indictment, prosecutor Inga Bejer Engh said 34 of the victims at Utoya were between 14 and 17 years old, 22 were aged 18-20, six were between 21 and 25 and seven were older than 25.

She said 67 died of gunshot wounds, and two died of fall injuries or drowning. In addition, 33 people were wounded by bullets, but survived.

Police spokesman Tore Jo Nielsen told Norwegian broadcaster NRK outside Ila prison in Oslo that Breivik had been "totally calm" when he was read the charges.

The terror charges carry a maximum penalty of 21 years in prison but prosecutors are working under the assumption that Breivik is legally insane and therefore unfit for prison. However, they said that this assessment could change during the trial.

A second, court-ordered psychiatric evaluation of Breivik is ongoing after an initial review, which concluded he was a paranoid schizophrenic, met widespread criticism. Some experts questioned whether someone suffering from a grave mental illness would be capable of carrying out attacks requiring such meticulous preparation.

Breivik himself rejected the diagnosis. He also rejects the authority of the Norwegian legal system, calling it a tool of the left-leaning elites he claims have betrayed the country.

Investigators haven't found any indications to support Breivik's claims that he belongs to a secret anti-Muslim resistance movement plotting to overthrow European governments and replace them with "patriotic" regimes.
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2012 10:01 am
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Norway 'Still Shattered' As Extremist Goes On Trial
by Eric Westervelt - NPR Weekend Edition Sunday
April 15, 2012

This week, Norwegians will be confronted again with the terrible details and trauma of the worst peacetime attack in the country's history.

Police say last July 22, Anders Behring Breivik set off a car bomb in the center of Oslo near government offices. The blast killed eight people and spun residents and police into a state of chaotic alarm and confusion.

The bombing was a deadly diversion that allowed the right-wing extremist to then make his way to the small bucolic Island of Utoya. There, dressed as a police officer, Breivik roamed the island and methodically gunned down 69 people — most of them teenagers attending a summer camp for the ruling Labor Party.

Hoping To Move On

Breivik, who has confessed to killing the 77 people and injuring dozens more, has said the attacks were a bid to stop a "Muslim invasion" of Europe. He goes on trial in Oslo Monday.

Nowadays, the orderly streets and sidewalks of Oslo are lined with blooming spring flowers. Families and safety-helmet wearing cyclists are out enjoying the sun. On the surface, it's hard to tell that some Norwegians are still deeply shaken by the massacre.

"The magnitude of the crime. So many people killed, so many people injured. The cold blood, everything," says Frank Rossavik, a commentator for a leading Norwegian weekly paper.

He says many want to move on. They're tired of hearing Breivik's name and about the horrific details. But the trial is now bringing it all back to peoples' computer screens, to their doorsteps in the morning paper, and back into their psyches.

"People are still shattered, and when they read about the awful things that went on in Utoya, the sadness comes back, and the shock comes back, to some extent," Rossavik says.

'You Have To Protect The Society'

Breivik has voiced no remorse for the massacre. He considers it part of a so-called "war" against multiculturalism, immigration and Islam, which he sees as the downfall of white, Christian Europe. He has said his only regret is that he didn't kill more people.

The case has sparked debate anew here about Norway's liberal criminal justice system. Breivik is charged with crimes including terrorism, and the maximum sentence if convicted is just 21 years.

The idea that Breivik could be out in two decades doesn't sit well with survivor Per Anders Langerod. The 26-year-old graduate student hid behind a rock before diving into the water and swimming for his life while Breivik killed those around him. He held on to a makeshift raft until rescuers plucked him from the cold water.

He told APTNvideo that he now supports a life sentence option for crimes such as Breivik's.

"Sometimes that is the right thing to do because you have to protect the society," he said. "And I won't run the risk of meeting Anders Behring Breivik on the subway in 20 years. That's not an option for me. Then I'd have to move from Norway."

The trial is expected to center on Breivik's mental health. Two sets of court-appointed psychiatrists have issued contradictory reports. The first said Breivik was a delusional paranoid schizophrenic. The second report said he was not psychotic or mentally ill at the time of the crime.

Young People Fight Breivik's Message

Norwegian crime novelist Jo Nesbo, a longtime Oslo resident, says the mass murder will leave an indelible mark on the country for decades to come. But he's not convinced it will affect Norwegian society in the way, say, the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks shook America.

"Simply because this was one individual, disturbed personality — he doesn't represent an important voice in the political landscape," Nesbo says.

Breivik targeted the future generation of the Labor Party, young people at the vanguard of what he detests: a more multicultural, ethically and religiously integrated Norway. However, the killing spree has only emboldened Norway's young people to get more involved: Membership in youth groups of all the main political parties has increased since the attack.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2012 10:13 am
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
There was an interview with his father in Friday's Guardian.

Quote:
"I was so … shocked, I did not know what to do," he says. "I couldn't … I was unable to do anything. I sat with my head in my hands. It was a terrible moment. I just could not face it. The media got here that evening and I hid. My wife told them I was in Spain."

Several months later, with his son in the dock – first judged criminally insane, now declared sane enough to face trial and jail – he still feels "terrible. Such pain. Constantly, I am reminded who I am. In the first few weeks, I thought seriously of taking my own life. I've lost the retirement I always imagined; that's gone. I will forever be asking how a man could possibly develop such thoughts. And could I have done something?"


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/apr/13/anders-behring-breivik-norway?INTCMP=SRCH
0 Replies
 
 

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