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Bonds Convicted

 
 
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:00 pm
Former San Francisco Giants outfielder Barry Bonds, whose record for most home runs in Major League Baseball has been under a cloud, was found guilty of obstruction of justice by a jury.

After eight years and millions of dollars. Was it worth congress's time and our money?

 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:03 pm
@edgarblythe,
No, because... who cares? And what's the sentence for that? Was THAT worth millions of dollars? Why prosecute him for something inane like "obstruction" when there are violent criminals running around out there on parole or probation?
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:03 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

Former San Francisco Giants outfielder Barry Bonds, whose record for most home runs in Major League Baseball has been under a cloud, was found guilty of obstruction of justice by a jury.

After eight years and millions of dollars. Was it worth congress's time and our money?




Yup. Drug use in baseball is rampant and he deserves to have an example made of him. If baseball wants to retain its' status as a noncompetitive monopoly, they'll comply with things such as this.

Cycloptichorn
Mame
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:04 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Come on - baseball is a sport! Big deal! It's different if they're scamming or physically hurting people - we need some perspective here.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:06 pm
@Mame,
I'm with Cyclo on this one. True, I've some understanding of the opposite point of view, but, nah.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:08 pm
@Mame,
Mame wrote:

Come on - baseball is a sport! Big deal! It's different if they're scamming or physically hurting people - we need some perspective here.


It's not just a 'sport,' it's a huge business. A tremendously large business with huge revenues. They deserve to be regulated just like any other business and when their employees are called to testify in front of Congress, and swear an oath not to lie, and then lie - blatantly - to the Congress, they deserve to be prosecuted for it. I can't understand how you could feel any differently.

Cycloptichorn
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:11 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
I do care about truth, but honestly, they're not harming anyone. So they take steroids, make a few bets... who does it really hurt? The ones who get my dander up are the politicians, lobbyists, other corrupt officials. I do believe if they find out he lied that he should be prosecuted like anybody else, but in a sporting situation, I just can't get all that worked up about it when I compare it to the effect Madoff had. That's where I'm coming from.
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:14 pm
@edgarblythe,
Yes - I think it should be regulated and brought to court in some way - but to Congress - no. Really Congress has bigger issues to deal with...
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:17 pm
@Cycloptichorn,

thanx to MLB's strict testing policy, drug use is no longer rampant in baseball.
only a handful of minor leaguers (and dunces like manny ramirez Exclamation ) get caught nowadays.

today's conviction all but guarantees no hall of fame for bonds...
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:19 pm
@Mame,
These turkeys make/made all the biggie money. Their natural talent, that I do grant, is obfuscated, at the least. Honest players didn't get promoted. This ramifies down into peewee leagues. Well, maybe not, but at least high school.

I'm also aware players of yore took amphetimines, and so on, so there is a linear history. Still, the record books are now a fine mess.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:20 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:
Yes - I think it should be regulated and brought to court in some way - but to Congress - no. Really Congress has bigger issues to deal with...


agree
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:22 pm
@ossobuco,
Who cares? It's not big in my world. I think there are bigger fish to fry. And what's his punishment going to be? Esp compared to REAL criminals (ie violent)?
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:23 pm
@ossobuco,
And I could give a **** about the record books. Who even remembers this stuff anyway?

Edit: It's like the Oscars, Emmy's and Golden Globe Awards.
dadpad
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:35 pm
Allowing him to get away ith lying to congress erodes the power of congressional inquiries.
Drug use in major league sport sets a bad example for youth.
This should be treated as no different to abuse of women. just because you are a major league baseball or football star does not mean you are immune from the law.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:35 pm
@Mame,
I understand that you don't care about sports. I get it. But some of us do.

I'll even go back to my piazza interest, that city sport rivalries cut into more vicious rivalries by putting neighborhood horses against each other (and similar forms). Or orange throwing rivalries. Or joustings. I think of these as a panoply of whaddyacallit, some psychiatric term that I can't come up with this minute - but a replacement and essentially a valve to let the gas out.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:38 pm
@dadpad,
agree totally that he should be prosecuted ... but it doesn't answer my question why HE was convicted when so many other, violent people are out there... legally. Read a Carl Hiaasen book! (lol) I would pick on worse people, is all I mean.
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:53 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

edgarblythe wrote:

Former San Francisco Giants outfielder Barry Bonds, whose record for most home runs in Major League Baseball has been under a cloud, was found guilty of obstruction of justice by a jury.

After eight years and millions of dollars. Was it worth congress's time and our money?




Yup. Drug use in baseball is rampant and he deserves to have an example made of him. If baseball wants to retain its' status as a noncompetitive monopoly, they'll comply with things such as this.

Cycloptichorn


why bonds and not McGuire or Sosa?
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:55 pm
@snood,
wait till they get done with roger...
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 04:56 pm
@snood,
Quote:


why bonds and not McGuire or Sosa?


Why not indeed? I think all of them should get punished for what they did.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2011 05:11 pm
@djjd62,
djjd62 wrote:

Linkat wrote:
Yes - I think it should be regulated and brought to court in some way - but to Congress - no. Really Congress has bigger issues to deal with...


agree
Yeah. If it had been some other law agency going after him I could have accepted it.
0 Replies
 
 

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