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Should prisoners have the right to vote?

 
 
Zara78
 
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 03:04 pm
The UK has continually defied ECHR ruling that the UK's prison population should be allowed universal suffrage. Should the UK fall into line in order to comply with the ECHR on principle? Or should they abstain due to ethics?
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Type: Question • Score: 9 • Views: 4,683 • Replies: 92
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BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 03:26 pm
@Zara78,
Amazing that anyone would think that a person who had already proven he or she is not a law abiding and useful citizen should still enjoy a share of control over the state.
Fil Albuquerque
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 04:12 pm
@BillRM,
Well I find it amazing that you think otherwise...are n´t they breathing living beings ? Even with limited access to society they are still a part of this world and very much part on the decision making just as long they are n´t allowed to commit any crime...your reasoning is plain flawed !
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 04:19 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
Sorry they should have no power over the state until they can show that they can behaved as useful citizens.

They surely should have no power over the state during the period that they are lock up for crimes!!!!

In the US civil rights are not restore in some states until a period of crime free behavior can be shown.
Fil Albuquerque
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 04:48 pm
@BillRM,
That´s just plain stubbornness..you did n´t actually addressed any of my remarks, did you ?
(A bridge to far or a step to far I recon...)
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 05:11 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
Your remark that because air go in and out of thier lungs they have a right to have control over a state that they had attacked by way of their unlawful actions?

Seem not to be worth replying to, in my opinion.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 05:14 pm
@BillRM,
There are way more criminals out than in. There are way more criminals out, voting, receiving pensions, being paid salaries, walking around free, giving speeches for recompense.

Quote:
In the US civil rights are not restore in some states until a period of crime free behavior can be shown.


That's not civil at all. The punishment ends when the sentence ends. Even during a period of parole, all normal societal rights that don't affect considerations of safety should be restored.

BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 05:31 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
That's not civil at all. The punishment ends when the sentence ends. Even during a period of parole, all normal societal rights that don't affect considerations of safety should be restored.


The power to vote or hold public office does affect safety and wellbeing of the society as a whole.

An interesting situtaon in my state is that we have large prsions and prison populations in rural areas with little popualation.

It would be amusing to have whole towns and in fact whole county governments control by the votes of felons living in these prisons.

JTT
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 05:59 pm
@BillRM,
Not many prisoners are in prison because of municipal/town/county laws. There's no need for a vote on that level. There is a need for them to vote for issues that affect them directly on a state and national level and there is much to be said for them having a voice. This could help them in their rehabilitation.
PaddyH
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 06:07 pm
@BillRM,
If their electorate automatically became that, within which the prison lies, they could indeed,in a tight election, carry the balance of power.
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 06:19 pm
@PaddyH,
Let me guess the line in which you follow...you suggest the side in which they voted would be kind of "contaminated" and suddenly become itself criminal like, right ??? a good program turns bad because the votes are not all from "clean" sources... linear American reasoning...anonymous votes won´t change the programs specially coming from minority´s...there´s simply no logical relation from where to draw a connection like that.

In turn breathing human beings, seams quite obvious, still exist and are a part of this world !
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 06:32 pm
@PaddyH,
Quote:
If their electorate automatically became that, within which the prison lies, they could indeed,in a tight election, carry the balance of power.


And vote in Tweedledee.

Considering the "quality" of candidates that have been elected even to the highest office in the land, the criminals that regularly inhabit said offices, what really would be the concern?
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 06:58 pm
@JTT,
What are you talking about?????

A right to vote is a right to vote on all level of governments.

And I see no reason why any sane society would give them a vocie at any level of government as they righlty loss that right by thier actions.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 07:06 pm
@PaddyH,
No need to be a tight election as there are prisons with a larger population then the communities around them.

The land is cheap and the labor for guards are cheap in those rural areas and the communities look on the jobs such prison product in far greater favor then more popultated and better off areas.

A numbers of whole towns and counties would likely be under the control of the immates if they had the power to vote.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 07:07 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
Quote:
In turn breathing human beings, seams quite obvious, still exist and are a part of this world !


So any human that exist should have the right to vote?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 07:36 pm
@BillRM,
Considering the number who are in prison for exceedingly dumb offenses, what was the number Spendi noted in another thread, you can hardly argue that your society is sane.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 07:38 pm
@JTT,
Sane or not sane allowing prisons from thier jail cells to vote is not sane.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 07:49 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
from thier jail cells to vote


Of course not you dummy. You don't get to vote from your home.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 08:34 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
Of course not you dummy. You don't get to vote from your home.


I can only assume you are on drugs.

Side note a large percent of the non-prison population indeed vote from their homes now in the US. Drunk
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2011 08:59 pm
@JTT,
My mother vote from her home kitchen table every election now and more and more people are doing so see below for the state of Florida.


http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/09/26/1844071/election-day-is-already-over-for.html


In 2008, 54 percent of ballots were cast by mail or at early voting sites, the first time in Florida that Election Day accounted for less than half of total turnout. Early voting could reach that threshold again in November.



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