16
   

The Michele Bachmann Watch

 
 
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2011 06:13 am
It might be a good idea to keep track of this woman. Some basics from her wiki biography might be helpful.

The Congresswoman, who is about to turn 55, was born in Iowa. When her parents divorced, she moved to Minnesota with her mother. She worked in a kibbutz after high school, attended Winona State University, the now defunct law school at Oral Roberts University and the William and Mary Law School where she took a master's degree in tax law.

She has been married for 30 years. "Bachmann and her husband own a Christian counseling clinic in Stillwater, Minnesota.
Bachmann also has an ownership stake in Waumandee, Wisconsin farm land. Since the death of her father-in-law, the farm and its buildings have been rented out to a neighboring farmer who maintains a dairy herd on the farm. From 1995 through 2006, the tenant-farmer received $251,973 in federal subsidies, chiefly for dairy and corn price supports."

Initially a Democrat, she became disillusioned with Jimmy Carter. In 1976, the CHristian documentary by Francis Schaeffer, "How Should We Then Live?" impelled her to take up an anti-abortion stance and she and her fiance began praying outside abortion facilities.



"In 1993, Bachmann and other parents started a K-12 charter school in Stillwater, and she began speaking against a state-mandated set of educational standards, which propelled her into the world of politics.

Bachmann became an outspoken critic and opponent of Minnesota's School-to-Work policies. In a 1999 column, she wrote: "School-to-Work alters the basic mission and purpose of K-12 academic education away from traditional broad-based academic studies geared toward maximizing intellectual achievement of the individual. Instead, School-to-Work utilizes the school day to promote children's acquisition of workplace skills, viewing children as trainees for increased economic productivity."*

* My reaction: what a surprise.
 
maxdancona
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2011 06:18 am
I love Michele Bachmann!

With any luck, she will be the Republican nominee for the 2012 presidential race.
0 Replies
 
33export
 
  3  
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2011 06:36 am
A dream opponent for the dems, really.

Now, if her running mate were to be someone named Turner, the dems could be in trouble, like, a Bachmann-Turner ticket would blow them off the road once the campaign got into overdrive.

Doubt if she'd adopt an anti-vocational ed stance, though.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2011 07:02 am
All I know, is the more I see her on television, the better.

0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  0  
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2011 09:45 am
@33export,
I'm not certain that everyone will "get" the reference to Bachmann-Turner. The Canadians, however, will.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2011 06:37 pm
@plainoldme,
It made me laugh (and I am American).
0 Replies
 
mysteryman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2011 05:43 am
@33export,
Thats only because you aint seen nothing yet.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2011 06:19 am
@mysteryman,
Oh Mysteryman, we have seen quite a bit from her.

Quote:
“Literally, if we took away the minimum wage—if conceivably it was gone—we could potentially virtually wipe out unemployment completely because we would be able to offer jobs at whatever level.”


Quote:
. So, I just take the Bible for what it is, I guess, and recognize that I am not a scientist, not trained to be a scientist. I’m not a deep thinker on all of this. I wish I was. I wish I was more knowledgeable, but I’m not a scientist.”


Quote:
Normaliza­tion (of gayness) through desensitiz­ation. Very effective way to do this with a bunch of second graders, is take a picture of “The Lion King” for instance, and a teacher might say, “Do you know that the music for this movie was written by a gay man?” The message is: I’m better at what I do, because I’m gay.”


Did I say I am a big fan of this lady?

mysteryman
 
  3  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2011 06:49 am
@maxdancona,
My comment was simply a reply to the backhanded reference to BTO.

IMHO, Michele Bachmann is not as sharp as a bowling ball and has no business even thinking about running for President.
maxdancona
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2011 06:54 am
@mysteryman,
Lol, that's really funny.

I can't believe I missed that.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Apr, 2011 09:58 pm
A friend forwarded this to me:


Michele Bachmann has become known as the Queen of the anti-government Tea Baggers, protesting health care reform and slamming every other government handout as “socialism.” But what her followers don’t know is that Rep. Bachmann is also a queen of another kind—a welfare queen. That’s right, the anti-government insurrectionist has taken more than a quarter-million dollars in government handouts thanks to corrupt farming subsidies she has been collecting for at least a decade.

And she’s not the only one who has been padding her bank account with taxpayer money.

Bachmann, of Minnesota, has spent much of this year agitating against health care reform, whipping up the tea-baggers with stories of death panels and rationed health care. She has called for a revolution against what she sees as Barack Obama’s attempted socialist takeover of America, saying his presidential policy is “reaching down the throat and ripping the guts out of freedom.”

But data compiled from federal records by Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit watchdog that tracks the recipients of agricultural subsidies in the United States, shows that Bachmann has an inner Marxist that is perfectly at ease with living on the government dole. According to the organization’s records, Bachmann’s family farm received $251,973 in federal subsidies between 1995 and 2006. The farm had been managed by Bachmann’s recently deceased father-in-law and took in roughly $20,000 in 2006 and $28,000 in 2005, with the bulk of the subsidies going to dairy and corn. Both dairy and corn are heavily subsidized—or “socialized”—businesses in America (in 2005 alone, Washington spent $4.8 billion propping up corn prices) and are subject to strict government price controls. These subsidies are at the heart of America’s bizarre planned agricultural economy and as far away from Michele Bachmann’s free-market dream world as Cuba’s free medical system. If American farms such as hers were forced to compete in the global free market, they would collapse.

However, Bachmann doesn’t think other Americans should benefit from such protection and assistance. She voted against every foreclosure relief bill aimed at helping average homeowners (despite the fact that her district had the highest foreclosure rate in Minnesota), saying that bailing out homeowners would be “rewarding the irresponsible while punishing those who have been playing by the rules.” That’s right, the subsidy queen wants the rest of us to be responsible.

Bachmann’s financial disclosure forms indicate that her personal stake in the family farm is worth up to $250,000. They also show that she has been earning income from the farm business, and that the income grew in just a few years from $2,000 to as much as $50,000 for 2008. This has provided her with a second government-subsidized income to go with her job as a government-paid congresswoman who makes $174,000 per year (in addition to having top-notch government medical benefits). “If she has an interest in a farm getting federal subsidy payments, she is benefiting from them,” Sandra Schubert, director of government affairs for the Environmental Working Group, told Gannett News Service in 2007, when the subsidies to Bachmann were first publicly disclosed.

But Bachmann isn’t the only welfare recipient on Capitol Hill. As it turns out, there is a filthy-rich class of absentee farmers—both in and out of Congress—who demand free-market rules by day and collect their government welfare checks in the mail at night, payments that subsidize businesses that otherwise would fail. Over the past couple of decades, welfare for the super-wealthy seems to be the only kind of welfare our society tolerates.

In the 11 years for which the Environmental Working Group has compiled data, the federal government paid out a total of $178 billion to American farmers. We’re not talking about the Joads here. The bulk of subsidies go to the wealthy, not small farmers, as Ken Cook, the group’s president, explained to the Central Valley (Calif.) Business Times:

American taxpayers have been writing farm subsidy checks to wealthy absentee land owners, state prison systems, universities, public corporations, and very large, well-heeled farm business operations without the government so much as asking the beneficiaries if they need our money. … Even if you live smack in the middle of a big city, type in a ZIP code and you’ll find farm subsidy recipients.

Chuck Grassley, the longtime Republican senator from Iowa who warns his constituents of Obama’s “trend toward socialism,” has seen his family collect $1 million in federal handouts over an 11-year period, with Grassley’s son receiving $699,248 and the senator himself pocketing $238,974. Even Grassley’s grandson is learning to ride through life on training wheels, snagging $5,964 in 2005 and $2,363 in 2006. In the Grassley family they learn early how to enjoy other people’s money.

Sen. Grassley railed against government intervention in the health care market, telling The Washington Times, “Whenever the government does more … that’s a movement toward socialism.” As the top Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, he ought to know, especially because the government has done more for him and his kin than for Americans struggling with high medical bills and mortgages. Even the free-market think tank the Heritage Foundation criticized Grassley on his deep connections to farming interests and his stubborn lack of transparency.

Then there’s Sen. Sam Brownback, R-Kan., whose family has been on the government take for at least the past 11 years, pocketing some $500,000. The senator recently held a “prayercast” with Michele Bachmann to beseech God to kill health care reform as soon as possible because it would bring an evil socialist spirit into America. Like Bachmann, Brownback has a fierce belief in God, the free market and a two-year limit on all welfare benefits—unless it’s welfare to rich Republicans who don’t need it.

Not surprisingly, Blue Dog Democrats are on board with this welfare-for-the-rich thing. Max Baucus, the fiscally conservative Democratic senator from Montana who did his best to sabotage the health care reform process before it ever began, collected $250,000 in taxpayer subsidies to his family’s farm while fighting to keep Americans at the mercy of free-market health insurance. Sen. Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas, another Democrat, also helped hold the line against so-called socialized medicine for Americans who need assistance, even though her family farm business follows the socialized subsidy playbook to a T. The Lincolns pocketed $715,000 in farm subsidies over a 10-year period, and the senator even admitted to using $10,000 of it as petty cash in 2007. Democratic Rep. Stephanie Sandlin of South Dakota stayed true to her conservative free-market roots by voting against the public option. Meanwhile, her daddy, Lars Herseth, a former South Dakota legislator, collected a welfare jackpot of $844,725 paid out between 1995 and 2006.

That’s just the way the game is played these days. Republicans and conservative Democrats bitch and moan about the allegedly Marxist underpinnings of universal health care and do everything they can to deny struggling Americans access to social services. Meanwhile, many of them profit off taxpayers in a massive welfare program.

Farm subsidies have become so corrupt that payments sometimes go to dead people for years. Federal farm subsidies, which were originally meant to help struggling farmers survive, are now little more than taxpayer robbery, taking taxpayer wealth from working Americans and sending it to the have-mores. According to 11 years’ worth of Environmental Working Group data that tracks $200 billion in subsidies, the wealthiest 10 percent of “farmers” have collected 75 percent of the money. That’s exactly the kind of socialism that Rep. Bachmann and her elite ilk like.

Yasha Levine is a mobile home inhabitin’ editor of The eXiled. He is currently stationed in Victorville, CA. Levine and co-editor Mark Ames first broke the connection between the Tea Party and the billionaire Koch brothers in Playboy.com in February 2009, sparking lawsuit threats, and causing CNBC’s Rick Santelli to publicly distance himself from the Tea Party movement and cancel his Daily Show appearance. You can reach him at levine [at] exiledonline.com.
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2011 06:48 pm
I love watching Michele Bachmann. She is funnier than any sitcom on television. Bad thing is she makes Mitt Ronmey look very solid. I mean, compared to Palin and Bachmann, Romney sounds like Einstein LOL.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Jul, 2011 07:18 am
@jcboy,
I believe that Bachmann has a real chance of beating Romney for the nomination. I think it will come down to the two of them, and Romney's negatives, from being a Mormon to having taken so many positions in the past that annoy conservatives.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  0  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2011 05:54 am
A "selection of recent articles on the Republican presidential wannabe and Tea Party darling", from the New Statesman HERE
farmerman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2011 06:18 am
@Walter Hinteler,
As amusing as a Bachmann candidacy would be, itll never happen. There are some intelligent people in the RNC who realize that this would be tantamount to handing over the presidential race to Obama without firing a shot. The RNC is scared that the public may love her like they do Sarah.With the GOP trying to find its "center of mass" they are p[arading out these clowns that can only cause them big trouble in November 2012
slkshock7
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2011 07:18 am
@farmerman,
Right now, I would give Bachmann about the same odds as I gave a certain young Senator from Illinois back in Jul, 2007.
farmerman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2011 07:26 am
@slkshock7,
That just means that you are used to making wrong predictions. Obama had the benefit of being an opponent of a popular and capable female candidate. The GOP field is now full of clowns. SO much so that I hear they all ride together in the same car when going to their various events.
slkshock7
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2011 07:30 am
@farmerman,
Well, that's exactly what I said of the Dem slate back in 2007 as well. You and I must think alike.
farmerman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2011 07:39 am
@slkshock7,
probably we agree on the law of gravity.
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Jul, 2011 08:36 am
Quote:
What Michele Bachmann and Her Teapot 'Patriots' Do Not Know About America
(John Nichols | The Nation | July 2, 2011)

The unsettling thing about Michele Bachmann’s failed discussion of the founders and slavery is not that the Tea Party “Patriot” knew so little about the birth of the American experiment that she made John Quincy Adams—the son of a somewhat disappointing founder (John) and the cousin of one of the true revolutionaries (Sam)—into something he was not.

Bachmann has for some time peddled the notion that the nation’s founding fathers worked “tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States.” She is simply wrong about this. The last of the revolutionaries generally recognized by historians as the founders—signers of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and their chief political and military comrades—passed in 1836, with the death of James Madison. That was twenty-seven years before the Emancipation Proclamation was issued, and twenty-nine years before the finish of the Civil War.

But Bachmann has never been bothered by the facts. Until now.

As she has moved from the fringe of the House Republican Caucus—which earlier this year dismissed her candidacy for a minor leadership role—into serious contention for the Republican presidential nomination, she has finally begun to be called out on some of her more outlandish statements.

Noting that many of the founders were slaveholders, George Stephanopoulos asked Bachmann the other day on ABC News’s Good Morning America to explain how she came to her distinctive view of the nation’s founding. “Well, if you look at one of our founding fathers, John Quincy Adams, that’s absolutely true,” the Minnesota congresswoman chirped. “He was a very young boy when he was with his father serving essentially as his father’s secretary. He tirelessly worked throughout his life to make sure that we did in fact one day eradicate slavery…”

In fact, John Quincy Adams was just 8 when the Declaration of Independence was signed and just 20 when the Constitution was being cobbled together at a convention that agreed to a “compromise” that identified a slave as three-fifths of a human being. He did not sign either document. Nor did he participate in any significant manner in the debates regarding those documents—or the compromises contained in them—until the last years of his life.

John Quincy Adams was, like his father, a critic of slavery. But as a diplomat, Cabinet member and president, he was relatively cautious in his approach to the issue -- fearing the divisions that an honest and thorough debate would stir. Only when he was in his mid-60s, after finishing his one term as president, did Adams emerge as an outspoken critic of human bondage. When he did so, his was a radical act of departure from the corrupt political consensus that allowed slavery to be maintained. Adams’s courageous stance in opposition to states rights and in favor of a strong federal government with a commitment to liberty and justice for all is surely worthy of note.

But Bachmann got Adams’s story wrong. And she refused to back off her error even when she was offered an opportunity to do so.

That ought to be troubling to anyone who takes seriously the detail and nuance of America’s founding and the progression of the American experiment. But it is not the most troubling thing about her ignorance with regard to the history of the revolutionary moment and its aftermath.

The really unsettling thing about Bachmann’s desperate struggle to explain away her errors and mischaracterizations is that, with a little effort, she could have gotten right the story of the fight over slavery at the point of American beginning.

There were, indeed, founders who objected to slavery. Thomas Jefferson tried to insert anti-slavery language into the Declaration of Independence, only to be rebuked by his fellow Southerners. Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Rush were relatively active abolitionists, for instance. More significantly, within the founding circle, a genuine foe of human bondage risked his place among the elites to stand, again and again, at the side of the disenfranchised: slaves, Native Americans, the landless masses and women.

Tom Paine , the man who called the United States into being, did not just write Common Sense.

Historians suggest that it was Paine who encouraged Jefferson to include the anti-slavery clause in the declaration.

And historians know that Paine was a regular contributor to the great radical journal of the colonial era, the Pennsylvania Journal and Weekly Advertiser, which in 1775 published “African Slavery in America,” the first article proposing the emancipation of African slaves and the abolition of slavery. In his time and to this day, it has been speculated that Paine wrote that pioneering article. Certainly, he associated himself with its values and ideals—particularly the declaration that: “Our Traders in MEN (an unnatural commodity!) must know the wickedness of the SLAVE-TRADE, if they attend to reasoning, or the dictates of their own hearts: and such as shun and stiffle all these, wilfully sacrifice Conscience, and the character of integrity to that golden idol.”

Those words were published March 8, 1775.

Barely one month later, on April 14, 1775, the first anti-slavery society in the American colonies was formed in Philadelphia.

Thomas Paine was a founding member.

If Michele Bachmann wanted to talk about a founder who was on the right side of history, she could have done so.

But that would require her to do more than talk about American history. She would have to read it. And she would have to do so with an eye toward understanding America as a work in progress where there have always been debates between progressives, like Paine and his “winter soldiers” of the visionary American revolution, and the “sunshine patriot” conservatives who were—and are—too afraid, or too wrongheaded, to do right by their fellow human beings.
 

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