7
   

How many kinds of fossilized cells of animals have been found?

 
 
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 12:12 am
Could you give the links to photos of such fossilized cells?
 
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 06:45 am
@bewildered,
NO, because that would be doing your homework and that pisses me off when kids boldly come on a site like little dumb birds seeking quick answers.
The types of fossils you seek are mostly seen from the fossilization process called distillation and to a minor extent petrification, and polymerization of stuff like coprolites (fossil doo doo). Id suggest going to a University Library or geology department and seeking out "The Treatise of PAleontology" . Its a very extensive set of books on vertebrate, invertebrate, trace, plant, and early eukaryotic fossil organisms. Its not an unfriendly set of books and its easy to maneuver for a bright kid like you. AND, you can find some sections on line by using a better science search engine than Google. Until then, have some fun in your assignment and dont be whiney, Life doesnt hand out answers.






        http://www.t-rat.com/images/Fossils%20Preservation/CoproliteCartoon.jpg
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 06:58 am
@bewildered,
bewildered wrote:
Could you give the links to photos of such fossilized cells?

If you put "Fossil Cells" into google several relevant links come up immediately. Have you looked at those? If you are looking at more specific information let us know, we might be able to help at that point.
Krumple
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 07:15 am
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:

bewildered wrote:
Could you give the links to photos of such fossilized cells?

If you put "Fossil Cells" into google several relevant links come up immediately. Have you looked at those? If you are looking at more specific information let us know, we might be able to help at that point.



I think farmer is right on this one. The OP doesn't want to do any homework or else it would be incredibly easy. The OP is obviously not even interested in the research or the information itself but instead wants someone else to do the work for them. I was a little puzzled myself when I first saw this posted, so I checked the OP's info and this is their first post. I am skeptical of anyone who posts like this for their first time and I wouldn't put much into answering if it is because to me it seems like they are just looking for a hand out. I could be wrong, but like I said, I'm skeptical that they are even here for any learning otherwise they would have done what you already pointed out. Google probably got them here, but they wanted someone else to take over from there.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 08:26 am
@Krumple,
I just get totally annoyed at how we enable people to be as lazy as possible. I mean, the kid took more time and effort to join A2K than to ask the question. Why not go the extra mie and do some work on ones own.

I gave the kid some ways to interrelate the answer to a better understanding of the question. Just pooping out links to pics of fossil cells wont do anything to foster any understanding. Its like collecting stamps or baseball cards .
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 08:53 am
Come on guys, someone has to graduate at the bottom of the class and who do you think is going to be draining our french fries in the future? We need kids like this.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 09:07 am
@Green Witch,
SO the kid should be learning proper diction to say

"Do you wish fries with that?"

I didnt want to accuse the kid of underachievement but now that you brought it up.
What is wrong with being smart?

NPR ran a thingy just Wednesday about reduced expectations in our own colleges from AMerican kids. Jeezuz were screwed, how we gonna be anywhere near where we were?
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 09:18 am
@farmerman,
A teacher friend of mine calls this "Google Brain". Instant gratification is the goal. There is no reward in the effort or the challenge. She says it's like reading the last chapter of a really good mystery novel before you've actually read the book. No thrill of the hunt. Shoot the fish in the barrel, it's so much easier. Don't think about having to get the fish in the barrel in the first place. This has become the norm rather than the exception. I'm glad I'm not younger. I'm glad I'm not a teacher.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 09:30 am
Interesting point about the OP doing more work to join A2K than searching for relevant info on Google.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 09:54 am
Oh my gosh?!!
How DO the fish get in the barrel?

Joe(And which US Federal Agency regulates the insertion?)Nation
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 10:26 am
And which of his many, many weapons does OmSigDavid use to shoot them? Does he use a laser sight or a telescopic one? Does he prefer a magnum or a smaller caliber weapon? Questions, always question.
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 10:30 am
And don't get farmerman started on why gungasnake is an idiot because the snake thinks in some peculiar corner of his brain that the discovery of fossil cells disproves evolution. (and don't you think any such thing either--it doesn't)
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 10:37 am
@Krumple,
Krumple wrote:
I think farmer is right on this one. The OP doesn't want to do any homework or else it would be incredibly easy.

I know, but I thought I might get him on the right track anyway.

A2K actually had a thread on Cellular Fossils a while back...
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jan, 2011 04:37 pm
@bewildered,
I didnt mean to skare the kid off but he or she's gotta know that I sometimes teach and I hate Google breath, its so friggin obvious when someone comes up with all this irrelevant **** about a question without ever getting to its nexus.

the point Ros made was about Hamburger posting a thread and it started off with understanding and some news about fossil cells. The discussion moved along further and further and yet the point was never missed by Hber that he had some information to share about something of interest to us who joined in.
If a kid would start a homewrok question with a central proposal and then pose some questions that show a deeper understanding (or at least an ATTEMPT) at a deeper understanding, then I dont think Id have any concern about helping.

I wont carry any worms to feed the helpless little birds by asking the dumass questions, its obvious the kid was past the little birdie stage, I will however, try to help the birdies feed themselves. Its the way education is supposed to work. if they aint interested , screw em, let mommie do their homework until they dont get accepted at the college of their choice.
0 Replies
 
bewildered
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2011 08:16 am
I bet none of you could answer my questions correctly. Here are some kinds of vertebrate fossil cells:
red blood cells, muscle cells, brain cells (neurons and neuroglial cells), bone cells.

What more could you add to the list?

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2011 08:22 am
@bewildered,
Wht re your sources? Im not sure I buy the neurons part. (Theres a diff between "preserved" and fossilized.
Im glad to see that you are doing your own work.
Did you look into the "Treatise of paleontology"?
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2011 09:27 am
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:
And which of his many, many weapons does OmSigDavid use to shoot them? Does he use a laser sight or a telescopic one? Does he prefer a magnum or a smaller caliber weapon? Questions, always question.
Laser sights r embarrassing (unless u use a bipod)
because u see that u r shaking the muzzle all over the place.





David
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2011 02:25 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
Laser sights r embarrassing (unless u use a bipod)
because u see that u r shaking the muzzle all over the place.


Perhaps you oughta call it a career before you hurt someone.
bewildered
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2011 08:25 pm
@farmerman,
Source for fossilized neuron:
http://scienceblogs.com/neurophilosophy/2010/03/fossilized_13th_century_brain.php
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2011 08:46 pm
@bewildered,
Technically, the term "fossil" is kind of misused in this case. The childs brain was merely preserved by a reaction between bacteria, salts in the environment , and free calcium . The name for the substance is adipocere , or a natural "soap-like" substance. The kids brain is merely being preserved for a time and , as it reduces further, will be gone in some time as the fatty acids that are converted are removed .Its actually a form of "mummification" . Mummies are really not fossils and , while your find is of archeological significance, the term "fossil" is a bit of hyperbole.
 

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