11
   

now what mexican drones in your backyard??????

 
 
Sglass
 
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 02:11 pm
Mexican drone crashes in backyard of El Paso home
by Diana Washington Valdez and Daniel Borunda / El Paso Times
Posted: 12/17/2010 12:00:00 AM MST


Click photo to enlargeNational Transportation Safety Board officials said that an... (Courtesy Aeronautics Defense System)«1»
Mexico drone
Should Mexico or the U.S. have aerial drones on the border? Read story
Yes, as long as it helps fight drug/human smugglers.
Yes, if the U.S. has them why not Mexico.
No, neither country should be able to snoop on each other.
No, there is potential for abuse.
Have not made up my mind.


A Mexican drone crashed in El Paso's Lower Valley, sparking a federal investigation and raising questions about why the aircraft was in U.S. airspace.

"We are collecting data about the crash. We don't have the aircraft because it was returned to its owner," said Keith Holloway, spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates aircraft crashes in the United States and in other countries that request its help.

Though the U.S. is known to use drones to patrol the border, this is thought to be the first time a Mexican drone has been reported operating at the border.

The drone crashed Tuesday on Craddock Avenue, near the intersection with Yarbrough Drive.

Holloway said the aircraft that crossed into U.S. airspace is a mini orbiter unmanned aerial vehicle developed by the Aeronautics Defense System.

According to the developer's website, the aircraft is designed for use in military and Homeland Security missions. It can be used for reconnaissance missions, low-intensity conflicts and urban warfare.

Officials at the Mexican consul's office in El Paso did not call back to provide details about what kind of operation the drone was a part of, how long drones have been in use or which government agency controlled it.

Vincent Perez, spokesman for U.S. Rep. Silvestre Reyes, said, "Our office was notified about the incident today (Thursday) after we asked Department of Homeland Security about the press reports on it. We don't have all the details


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yet, but we expect to receive more information."
Reyes, D-Texas, former chief of the U.S. Border Patrol-El Paso sector, is chairman of the House Select Committee on Intelligence.

Perez said Reyes' staff was certain that drones were not part of the equipment earmarked for Mexico under the Merida Initiative.

The North American Aerospace Defense Command would not comment on the incident and referred all questions to the Department of Homeland Security and Customs and Border Protection.

In a statement, Jenny L. Burke, spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, said, "We responded to a concerned citizen's call and recovered a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), which belonged to the Government of Mexico (GOM).

"We worked collaboratively with the GOM and other U.S. federal agencies to coordinate the return of the UAV to (Mexico)."

Neither Department of Homeland Security or U.S. Border Patrol officials would say why the drone was returned to Mexico before investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board could inspect it.

Border Patrol Agent Ramiro Cordero said only that numerous agencies were involved in returning the drone to Mexico on Wednesday.

"It is an ongoing investigation," Cordero said.

U.S. federal officials also would not disclose the exact address on Craddock Avenue where the crash occurred.

Depending on the exact point of impact, the drone might have been from a third of a mile to a half-mile inside the United States.

The El Paso Police Department was the first agency to confirm that the Mexican drone had crashed in the city.

"I was told that it crashed in somebody's backyard, and that no one was injured. I was paged at 6:28 p.m. on Tuesday, so it happened shortly before that," El Paso police Detective Mike Baranyay said. "We were told it was not a police matter."

Baranyay said the U.S. Border Patrol secured the aircraft, which was transported back to one of the international bridges, where it was returned to Mexican officials.

According to www.defenseindustrydaily.com in 2009, Aeronautics Defense Systems of Yavneh, Israel, planned to sell Mexico's federal police over $22 million worth of its Skystar 300 surveillance aerostats and small Orbiter UAVs.

"Mexico doesn't make the headlines very often, but the country faces what counter-terrorist analyst John Robb has called a growing 'open source insurgency' of narco-traffickers and some leftist groups," the website said.

An online site that sells weapons (www.israeli-weapons.com/weapons/aircraft/uav/orbiter/Orbiter.html) advertises the same kind of mini UAV that crashed in the Lower Valley.

John Concha, spokesman for the Fire Department, said emergency units were not sent to the crash site because no one was injured.

The crash occurred after sunset on Tuesday in the yard of a house on Craddock Drive near Yarbrough and the César Chávez Border Highway.

The homes in the former agricultural area sit on lots of one to two acres that contain large fields and tall trees.

The neighborhood is separated from Mexico by the Rio Grande, floodlights, the 15- to 18-foot tall rust-colored border fence, a chain-link fence, a line of poles with surveillance cameras and the César Chávez Border Highway.

Border Patrol agents are a part of daily life in the neighborhood, but residents said they were surprised to hear about the crash of a Mexican drone.

A U.S. helicopter flew along the Rio Grande on Thursday afternoon while Bobby Garcia, accompanied by his two dogs, did yard work at his home on Craddock Avenue near Yarbrough Drive.

"The helicopter will roam around once in a while, but nothing like that," Garcia said after hearing about the drone incident.

Garcia lives less than a half-mile from the border.

"I feel pretty safe, I guess," Garcia said. "If anybody crosses over, they are just making tracks to get farther north. They don't stop here."

Diana Washington Valdez may be reached at [email protected]; 546-6140.

Daniel Borunda may be reached at [email protected]; 546-6102.



Closer look
The Orbiter Mini unmanned aerial vehicle system is a compact and lightweight system designed for use on military and Homeland Security missions. The Orbiter is touted as the ultimate solution for over-the-hill reconnaissance missions, low-intensity conflicts and urban warfare operations.
Orbiter Mini UAV specifications
Max ceiling -- 500-2,000 feet
Operational speed -- 30-70 knots
Max speed -- 70 Knots
Max altitude -- 18,000 feet
Max payload -- 3.3 pounds
Endurance -- 3-4 hours
Source: Aeronautics Defense System.

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Type: Discussion • Score: 11 • Views: 5,068 • Replies: 30

 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 02:17 pm
@Sglass,
Maybe High Seas will drop in and help with my confusion. I don't begin to know how high it flies with specs like these

Max ceiling -- 500-2,000 feet

Max altitude -- 18,000 feet
0 Replies
 
Sglass
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 02:22 pm
See whatcha mean. Calling High Seas.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 02:32 pm
@Sglass,
I had often wonder why the drug lords do not hire a few engineers and give them a budget of a few hundreds of thousands of dollars to create small and cheap GPS/Computers control drones to bring drug over the border.

They had gone into both semi-submersible and even full submarines to haul cargo so why not drones?

Side note such a system could also be turn into one hell of a terrorist weapon.

The technology to do so is plenty must in the public domain see transatlantic weather drones projects.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 02:58 pm
Hell . . . i thought this thread was gonna be about killer bees from south of the border . . .
roger
 
  3  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 03:01 pm
@Setanta,
Oh? I thought it was going to be about lazy illegals.
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 03:41 pm
@roger,
I thought is was going to be about people who go on and on in monotone Spanish.
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 04:01 pm

Citizens of Texas and the other border states
shoud all be issued by the US Army (or NASA)
free anti-aircraft guns.

In the public schools, along with arithmetic
thay shoud teach fonetic spelling and the proper operation
of said anti-aircraft guns, for optimal accuracy.





David
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 04:42 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
What bizarre notion leads you to assume that NASA possesses anti-aircraft artillery? When this "fonetic spelling" is taught, will the silly non-distinction between they and "thay" be included? What about schools--is "ch" really necessary to make a "k" sound? What about accuracy? Why two "c's" rather than a "k?"

You're only consistent in that you are reliably inconsistent in your insistence on "fonetic" spelling.
Sglass
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 04:54 pm
Now that I have thought about this for awhile it occured to me that drones would be an excellent way to smuggle drugs. Now if the cartels were to get their own flying field and they could just bop the drones by remote control to remote areas where someone would do the pickup.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 07:23 pm
@Setanta,
Ya know, you've just hit one of my pet peeves. There is a brand of kids' toys/furniture out there called something like Play Skool. I grit my teeth to keep from smashing the damn stuff.

Want to teach our kids "The Three Rs". Fine, but learn how to spell first.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 07:57 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:
Ya know, you've just hit one of my pet peeves.
There is a brand of kids' toys/furniture out there called something like Play Skool.
I grit my teeth to keep from smashing the damn stuff.

Want to teach our kids "The Three Rs". Fine, but learn how to spell first.
The way that we were tawt to spell
is NOT the right way to SPELL, except insofar as it is fonetic.

We O our loyalty to LOGIC,
not to stupid atavistic tradition.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 08:16 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
What bizarre notion leads you to assume that NASA possesses anti-aircraft artillery?
Thay can get some.
My thawt was that the Mexican drones were involved in Aeronautics,
in American Space. (a note of levity; pun intended)



Setanta wrote:
When this "fonetic spelling" is taught, will the silly non-distinction between they and "thay" be included?
No. The distinction that will remain is that "they"
is misspelled because of the difference between
an e and an a. It is pronounced as I wrote it: long a.





Setanta wrote:
What about schools--is "ch" really necessary to make a "k" sound?
K shoud be in & ch is out, except
to generate such a sound as CHURCH.


Setanta wrote:
What about accuracy?
Why two "c's" rather than a "k?"
K is better.




Setanta wrote:
You're only consistent in that you are reliably inconsistent in your insistence on "fonetic" spelling.
I plead guilty to inconsistency.
There is extremely little chance that I will participate in writing the first fonetic dictionary.
Other minds will polish the improvements,
but I 'm pointing out the old problems
(instead of continuing to participate in and to perpetuate them,
as I used to do in years past). Almost ALL of English is already fonetic.

There r only a relative few
non-fonetic lexical relics from the earlier Germanic pronunciation.

Don't be an old stick-in-the-mud conservative, Setanta.





David
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 08:20 pm
@Swimpy,
Trying to remember if I've ever heard a native spanish speaking person do monotone. Me, on the other hand, si.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 09:08 pm
@ossobuco,
Now that you mention it, I have never heard a Spanish speaker talk in a monotone.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 09:42 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:
Now that you mention it,
I have never heard a Spanish speaker talk in a monotone.
Perhaps, for a modest consideration . . .
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Dec, 2010 10:25 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:
Now that you mention it, I have never heard a Spanish speaker talk in a monotone.

I take it you've never seen Efren Ramirez as Pedro in the movie Napoleon Dynamite.

'Course he's not actually speaking Spanish in the movie.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Dec, 2010 12:54 am
@roger,
roger wrote:

Now that you mention it, I have never heard a Spanish speaker talk in a monotone.


Didn't Jose Jimenez or one of Speedy Gonzalez's peon mouse friend speak in a monotone?
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Dec, 2010 01:00 am
@Ticomaya,
Ticomaya wrote:

roger wrote:
Now that you mention it, I have never heard a Spanish speaker talk in a monotone.

I take it you've never seen Efren Ramirez as Pedro in the movie Napoleon Dynamite.

'Course he's not actually speaking Spanish in the movie.


How right are you? So right that I was thinking about the exact same guy when I read Rog' post.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Dec, 2010 05:10 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Dunno. Never heard heard them do that.
0 Replies
 
 

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