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What sort of doona/comforter'duvet for an allergy sufferer?

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 06:25 pm
@ehBeth,
Thanks, Beth.

Quote:
You could get a nice light-weight down duvet (1 - 2 pound)


Duck feathers, perhaps? I like the "light weight" element.

Quote:
- and keep it inside duvet covers - best made of very very tightly woven cotton in your climate - 800+ thread count.


Yep, I have a few of those now. Terrific & easy re ease of washing, etc ..
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 06:27 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
no, no


No, no? Confused

Have I said something else confusing, osso? Smile
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 06:45 pm
Just doing a bit of Googling about doonas, including maintenance. I came across this (advertising) information about dust mites. :

Quote:
About Dust Mites

Dust Mites love bedding, mattresses, quilts and pillows. If you don't regularly clean your bedding, you can rest assured that at night you share your bed with millions of these allergy inducing insects.

What is a Dust Mite?

http://www.quiltpillowfactory.com.au/files/C9I5VOE8HC/dust-mite.jpg
Doesn't it give you the shivers, just to look at this horrible creature and think, millions of those things crawl around your bed when you are fast asleep. The good news is that Dust Mites do not bite or sting but they do harbour strong allergens in their bodies as well as in their secretions, excreta and shed skins. Constant contact with these allergens can trigger respiratory and dermatological complaints. Not nice. So, make sure you send your quilt and pillows to the Quilt and Pillow Factory for rejuvenation and cleaning regularly. Our process uses natural Eucalyptus Oils to kill the Mites.

Where do Dust Mites like to live?

The answer is: in your bed!!! This little nasty comes under the easy to remember name of Dermatophagoides Pteronyssinus, so it's easier to remember them as Dust Mites. The bad news is that there are more than one type, dusty environments harbour other species of predatory mites. Dust Mites like to live in areas that have high humidity and are warm. Dust Mites are also associated with allergies.

What do we do about Dust Mites?


The simple answer to that is, kill them. Stone dead. We use natural cleaning ingedients to do the job, like eucalyptus oil. We clean and sanitise your pillows and quilts and add more down or feathers if needed. Most quilts and pillows need regular cleaning, not Dry Cleaning.


http://www.quiltpillowfactory.com.au/html/s02_article/article_view.asp?id=101&nav_cat_id=130&nav_top_id=55
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 07:01 pm
@msolga,
msolga wrote:
I think your climate sounds similar to mine, so I'm listening carefully. PLUS you're an allergy suffer. We are on the same page! Very Happy
OK, you'd recommend cotton, or wool, then? Any "down sides" to either of those you're aware of?


Yes, we do have similar climate and you never go wrong with cotton. Not only
can you wash it on high setting (to kill all dust mites) I occasionally let the bedding dry in the sun too (hanging wash outside thread Very Happy) that kills all germs
and the sun acts as natural bleaching agent as well - whites stay white.

I don't use the wool blanket very often, as I'd like to have it cool, even in winter. Like ehbeth said, I use the duvet cover as blanket and if I am cold I also use the wool blanket or a quilt on top of it.

In Germany, my Mom uses all goose feather beds, it's fine for their climate
but here I'd be afraid of all the little dust mites. A synthetic pillow/duvet
I can wash really hot and kill the dust mites, with goose feathers you can't do that.

If possible, MsOlga, use a plastic wrap or a special cover for your mattress
and wash it weekly along with your sheets. This way you're for sure sleeping
without any dust mites around.

ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 07:02 pm
@msolga,
down, not feathers

feathers aren't bad under you, but not so nice in a duvet on top of you

(hamburgboy points out that a feather comforter would also be too heavy)
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 07:09 pm
@msolga,
No, that was me.

smiles
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  3  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 07:09 pm
Dust mites don't like wool because wool spreads out the moisture and dries quickly. There are very little dust mites in wool. And 100% Natural Latex has antibacterial properties which help keep the dust mites away as well.

Our 100% Natural Latex mattress covered with Organic Cotton and Pure Grow Wool quilted to the fabric is the best choice for someone with Dust Mite Allergies.

Down-filled pillows, quilts, or comforters should not be used. Down filling consists of tiny feathers that contain large numbers of dust mites.

http://www.ecobedroom.com/

0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 07:47 pm
@msolga,
If you haven't had feather/down bedding before, I'd advise investing in a small pillow filled with the various types of comforter filling and sleep with each for a few days to see if you have an allergic reaction to any of them.

I am allergic to down and feathers and can't have them anywhere near me while sleeping or I wake up with a swollen face and clogged sinuses. When BBB and I traveled in Europe we had to always ask for replacement bedding and pillows because the down and feather filled ones were so common there.

If I lived in a house temperature that required one, I'd purchase something like this one. As it is, I don't sleep with even a top sheet on me most nights.

http://images-p.qvc.com/is/image/h/80/h161980.001?wid=535&hei=472&op_sharpen=1

Sealy Posturepedic F/Q Down-Alternative Ringstitch Comforter

Stay cozy on the coolest of evenings. Offering warmth and durability, this down-alternative comforter is filled with hypoallergenic MaxiLoft fiber that lofts beautifully. The ringstitch design helps to lock the fill in place and create a fluffy look on the bed, while the 230TC cotton tick is breathable and long-lasting. From Sealy Posturepedic.

* Full/Queen sized at 88" x 90"; weighs 54 oz
* Tick 100% cotton, 230TC; fill MaxiLoft fiber
* Machine wash, tumble dry
* 1-year Limited Manufacturer's Warranty
* Made in USA of imported materials

# QVC Price:
# $52.72
# Shipping & Handling: $7.97

In case you can't access the QVC site from Oz, here's a link to the Sealy site, but the price is a bit higher:

https://www.sealybedding.com/comforters

tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 07:53 pm
@dyslexia,
dyslexia wrote:

what's a doona?

Aren't they faux shortbread cookies?
http://snacks.cyberpunks.org/lorna.gif
http://purpleisright.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/turtle.gif
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 08:20 pm
@msolga,
Oh, you have a cat? Might I suggest Kevlar?
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Oct, 2010 09:21 pm
@roger,
you have a cat... keep your door closed. (well, I don't but lady Diane does)
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Oct, 2010 01:30 am
@CalamityJane,
Thanks again, Jane.

I'm thinking wool or cotton, more & more. Especially since I read that "harvesting" down from live ducks or geese is very painful for them, according to animal advocates. (Another thing to take into consideration.) And being able to wash a doona/comforter/duvet (as opposed to dry cleaning) is a real bonus!

Quote:
I occasionally let the bedding dry in the sun too (hanging wash outside thread Very Happy) that kills all germs and the sun acts as natural bleaching agent as wel l)


Me, too!
I have no idea whether there are dust mites present or not, but I love the way my washing (& my doona) smells after a sunny day outside on the clothesline.

Quote:
In Germany, my Mom uses all goose feather beds, it's fine for their climate...


I spent my whole childhood & adolescence sleeping under one of those, Jane.
A great, big, fat, bulky one! As did all my family.
If it was good enough for Ukrainians, it was good enough for Oz! Too bad the climate of both countries is so different. I can't tell you how HOT it it got, as the weather warmed up in spring & summer! Shocked
Then, when I left home (in the country) to pursue further tertiary studies in the city, they presented me with with a brand new one, to keep forever! More hot nights. Laughing
I didn't sleep under blankets, or a doona even, till I was in my early twenties. Ahhhhhh. What a relief! Smile


0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Oct, 2010 01:42 am
@Butrflynet,
Quote:
...Stay cozy on the coolest of evenings. Offering warmth and durability, this down-alternative comforter is filled with hypoallergenic MaxiLoft fiber that lofts beautifully. The ringstitch design helps to lock the fill in place and create a fluffy look on the bed, while the 230TC cotton tick is breathable and long-lasting. From Sealy Posturepedic.


Ah, another allergy sufferer, Butrflynet. My commiserations.
Though your afflictions definitely sounds worse than mine!

Quote:
hypoallergenic MaxiLoft fiber


I know that's a brand name, but I'll have to check out doonas with hypoallergenic fibres, definitely.

One question: Washable? (I suspect they would be.)


0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Oct, 2010 01:59 am
@tsarstepan,
dyslexia wrote:
Quote:
Quote:
what's a doona?


Aren't they faux shortbread cookies?


Nice try, tsar, but you're not even warm. Smile

You know, I was very surprised that Australians were the only ones (apparently) that called these things "doonas". I'd always thought it was some sort of Scandinavian derivation. (as in: "Will you stop hogging the doona, Sven. You're not the only one who feels the cold, you know!")

Turns out I was almost (though not quite) right:

Quote:
In Australia, a duvet or down quilt is often called a "Doona", which is a genericized trademark (registered to the Tontine Group) which is derived from the equivalent common Scandinavian term dyne and popularized by the retailer IKEA in the 1970s. Originally the term continental quilt was the standard name used across Australia.


http://www.answers.com/topic/duvet

Interesting, hey? Wink
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Oct, 2010 02:10 am
@roger,
Quote:
Oh, you have a cat? Might I suggest Kevlar?


Believe it or not, roger, I actually Googled Kelvar (not having the vaguest idea of what it was.)

Now I know.
It wouldn't work on my cat. I know it wouldn't.
It might be terrific in repelling dust mites, though! Smile

0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Oct, 2010 02:11 am
@dyslexia,
Quote:
you have a cat... keep your door closed. (well, I don't but lady Diane does)


That wouldn't work, either, dys.
Besides, it would be cruel! Wink
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Oct, 2010 02:37 am
Thanks for all the good advice here, all.
Yesterday, while out on one of my walks, I ended up buying my new doona, a bit earlier than I'd planned to. From a local wholesaler, where I'd purchased sets of sheets & pillow cases before.
I bought a wool blend, "non allergic", machine washable doona ... "ideal for asthma & allergy sufferers" ... for considerably less $$$ than similar products I'd checked out online.
I considered the 100% wool ones available, but the convenience of being able to wash this one was the decider.
Thanks again for your input. Much appreciated. Smile
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Fri 8 Oct, 2010 08:28 am
@msolga,
Good for you, MsOlga! It pays to shop around a bit and get what you want
for much less $$$. After you initiated this thread, I also went out and bought
new pillows (hypo allergenic) and a pillow encasing that's resistant to dust mites.
0 Replies
 
 

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