19
   

Amanda Knox

 
 
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 2 Jul, 2018 12:38 am
It looks as if .nut is down.

If it is down permanently, that leaves .com as the sole survivor.

Fitting really.

http://perugiamurderfile.homestead.com
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2018 01:02 am
@oralloy,
Apparently down permanently. Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 12:35 am
The European Court of Human Rights will today give its ruling whether Amanda Knox’s last remaining conviction over the 2007 death of her British flatmate Meredith Kercher in the Italian city of Perugia should be overturned.
ECHR wrote:
[...]
Relying on Article 6 §§ 1 and 3 (c) (right to a fair hearing / right to legal assistance), the applicant
alleges that she was not assisted by a lawyer during the interviews of 6 November 2007. She
complains that the proceedings were unfair. Relying on Article 6 §§ 1 and 3 (a) (right to be informed
promptly of the accusation), she submits that she was not informed promptly, in a language she
understood, of the nature and cause of the accusations against her. Relying on Article 6 §§ 1 and 3
(e) (right to the assistance of an interpreter), she complains that she was not provided with a
professional or independent interpreter during her police interviews of 6 November 2007 and that
the police employee who assisted her had played a role of “mediator”, encouraging her to imagine
hypothetical scenarios.
Relying on Articles 3 (prohibition of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment) and 8 (right to
respect for private and family life), Ms Knox complains that she suffered ill-treatment during a police
interview of 6 November 2007. She says she was slapped on the head twice, was subjected to
extreme psychological pressure and forced to speak at a point where she was incapable of showing
discernment or willpower
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 05:54 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The ECHR has ordered Italy to pay Amanda Knox around 18,000 Euros ( 0,400 € damages plus 8,000 € for costs and expenses) in damages for police failure to provide legal assistance and a translator during the questioning following the November 2007 killing.


From the ECHR pressrelease (To be downloaded: https://hudoc.echr.coe.int/eng-press#{%22sort%22:[%22kpdate%20Descending%22],%22itemid%22:[%22003-6308618-8238134%22]} )
Quote:
The case concerned proceedings leading to the conviction of Amanda Knox for malicious accusation.
During a police interview on 6 November 2007 Ms Knox accused a pub manager of killing her
flatmate. The man was subsequently found to be innocent and she was sentenced to three years’
imprisonment for making a malicious accusation.
In today’s Chamber judgment1
in the case of Knox v. Italy (application no. 76577/13) the European
Court of Human Rights held, unanimously, that there had been:
a violation of the procedural limb (investigation) of Article 3 (prohibition of torture and inhuman
or degrading treatment) of the European Convention on Human Rights
The Court held in particular that Ms Knox had not had the benefit of an investigation capable of
shedding light on the facts and any responsibility, further to her allegation that she had been
ill-treated on 6 November 2007 at a time when she had been entirely under police control. In spite
of her repeated complaints, no investigation into the alleged treatment had been forthcoming.
no violation of the substantive limb of Article 3 (prohibition of torture and inhuman or degrading
treatment) of the Convention
The Court found that it did not have any evidence to show that Ms Knox had been subjected to the
inhuman or degrading treatment of which she had complained.
a violation of Article 6 §§ 1 and 3 (c) (right to legal assistance)
The Court took the view that the Italian Government had not succeeded in showing that the
restriction of Ms Knox’s access to a lawyer, at the police interview of 6 November 2007 at 5.45 a.m.
– when there was a criminal charge against her – had not irreparably undermined the fairness of the
proceedings as a whole.
a violation of Article 6 §§ 1 and 3 (e) of the Convention (right to the assistance of an interpreter).
The Court held that the authorities had failed to assess the conduct of the interpreter (who had seen
herself as a mediator and had adopted a motherly attitude towards Ms Knox while the latter was
formulating her statement), to examine whether her interpreting assistance had been consistent
with the safeguards under Article 6 §§ 1 and 3 (e) of the Convention, or to consider whether that
conduct had had an impact on the outcome of the criminal proceedings against Ms Knox. In the
Court’s view, that initial failure had thus had repercussions for other rights and had compromised
the fairness of the proceedings as a whole.
[...]
Judgment was given by a Chamber of seven judges, composed as follows:
Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos (Greece), President,
Ksenija Turković (Croatia),
Guido Raimondi (Italy),
Ledi Bianku (Albania),
Aleš Pejchal (the Czech Republic),
Armen Harutyunyan (Armenia),
Pauliine Koskelo (Finland),
and also Renata Degener, Deputy Section Registrar
[... ... ...]
The Court held that Italy was to pay Ms Knox 10,400 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary
damage and EUR 8,000 for costs and expenses.
The judgment is available only in French.
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 09:50 am
@Walter Hinteler,
About time.

They should have made Italy pay her compensation right now for illegally holding her in prison for four years.

Still, Italy will have to pay in the end, after her slander conviction has been cleared from the books.

I encourage Germany to continue to insist on spending and debt limits for nations using the Euro. No one wants Italy to be able to get out of this by printing money. When Italy is finally forced to pay compensation to Amanda and Raffaele, they need to get that money by closing pension funds and children's hospitals.

Now then.... isn't it about time to set Rudy Guede completely free to roam the streets of Italy at will? Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil

Sorry, it really wasn't possible to adequately convey the viciousness of my grin in that last line of text.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 10:01 am
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
They should have made Italy pay her compensation right now for illegally holding her in prison for four years.
The court didn't follow your advice.

oralloy wrote:
When Italy is finally forced to pay compensation to Amanda and Raffaele
By whom and how?
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 10:19 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
The court didn't follow your advice.
I noticed. Shame on them.

Walter Hinteler wrote:
By whom and how?
Ideally, after Amanda's slander conviction is overturned, Italian courts will award her half a million euros compensation for having illegally kept her in prison for four years.

Whether Italy does or doesn't do this, the case will then go back to the European Court of Human Rights to have them order Italy to pay Amanda and Raffaele many millions of euros.

The next step is to get her slander conviction overturned. So, onward....
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 10:57 am
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
Whether Italy does or doesn't do this, the case will then go back to the European Court of Human Rights to have them order Italy to pay Amanda and Raffaele many millions of euros.
So there are new Protocols to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms to make this possible? Could you give a link?
oralloy
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 11:47 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
So there are new Protocols to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms to make this possible?
No. It's the same old protocols.

Walter Hinteler wrote:
Could you give a link?
http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Library_Collection_P7postP11_ETS117E_ENG.pdf

Article 3 - Compensation for wrongful conviction
When a person has by a final decision been convicted of a criminal offence and when subsequently his conviction has been reversed, or he has been pardoned, on the ground that a new or newly discovered fact shows conclusively that there has been a miscarriage of justice, the person who has suffered punishment as a result of such conviction shall be compensated according to the law or the practice of the State concerned, unless it is proved that the non-disclosure of the unknown fact in time is wholly or partly attributable to him.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 12:12 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Could you give a link?
The link I gave in my previous post would only cover a claim for half a million euros (although tax free). That is what Italian law says they are owed for a wrongful conviction.

Claims for many millions of Euros will come under this provision:

http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf

3. Everyone arrested or detained in accordance with the
provisions of paragraph 1 (c) of this Article shall be brought
promptly before a judge or other officer authorised by law to
exercise judicial power and shall be entitled to trial within a
reasonable time or to release pending trial. Release may be
conditioned by guarantees to appear for trial.

4. Everyone who is deprived of his liberty by arrest or detention
shall be entitled to take proceedings by which the lawfulness of
his detention shall be decided speedily by a court and his release
ordered if the detention is not lawful.

5. Everyone who has been the victim of arrest or detention
in contravention of the provisions of this Article shall have an
enforceable right to compensation.


Italy did not give Amanda and Raffaele a speedy trial. It took four years to acquit them. Nor did Italy release them pending trial.

This means that Amanda and Raffaele's detention was not merely a miscarriage of justice. It was outright illegal for Italy to have held them in jail for those four years.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 06:28 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
Quote:
oralloy wrote:
They should have made Italy pay her compensation right now for illegally holding her in prison for four years.

The court didn't follow your advice.


They probably should. It might save them money on lawsuits....
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 24 Jan, 2019 07:23 pm
@gungasnake,
Lawsuits are the least of Italy's problems. Italy's persecution of Amanda and Raffaele resulted in Guede's LIFE sentence being reduced, first to 30 years, and then to 16.

Guede is already being released during the day for employment (at a local Centre for Criminological Studies no less).

As soon as Guede is completely free to roam an Italian college town at night, I expect that Karma has something grim in store for Italy.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Guilty murderer Amanda Knox - Question by contrex
Amanda Knox - Discussion by JTT
The Trial that JUST WON'T END - Question by michellesings
Amanda Knox conviction thrown out - Discussion by gungasnake
Multinational Murder Mystery - Discussion by wandeljw
Who killed Meredith Kercher? - Discussion by DylanB
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Amanda Knox
  3. » Page 102
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 04/18/2019 at 08:28:03