38
   

Can you FEEL high blood pressure?

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 06:40 pm
@chai2,
agreed. I keep mine operating a lot. Ill plot my BP (I like data) throughout a given day and compare it to days of exercise, days with weird foods , etc.

One of those digital cuffs costs about 90 bucks and , if you have a "benefits bank account" you can use that money to buy it. I took m y cats BP just to see. WOW, cats get stressed out with a cuff around their necks. I guess that wasnt a great idea.
I dont even know whether a cats BP is a meaningful piece of information and I really only tried to collect that data cause I could.

I didnt like those little finger tip BP digital meters, they dont seem to have enough surface area to give correct data. I was getting way different readings on each finger and (thats not good) so I had my doctor check it out by comparing my readings with hers.
I always check any new BP meter against my docs. They all are calibrated but sometimes you can get an instrument that reads artificially LOW. (dont know why)
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 06:57 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

I took m y cats BP just to see. WOW, cats get stressed out with a cuff around their necks.



i thought i was the only one who considered taking a cats BP. It's nice to know I'm not alone.

however, I never thought of the neck, I wondered how I could get the cuff around it's little arm.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 07:01 pm
@chai2,
I can see the coroner's report now...

man found dead with giant cat attached like clawed python to neck. (cat strangely enough has a blood pressure meter around his...)
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 07:22 pm
My wrist thing from Walgreen's was much much less, Farmer. I figure it's faulty, but so am I.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 07:26 pm
@Rockhead,
c'mon, like you've never thought of taking stinky's BP.

you know, just to see...
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 07:35 pm
@chai2,
not even once on crack at the cathouse.

(he has already informed me that the next time I think he requires medical care, one of us might die...)
margo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 08:36 pm
@Rockhead,
Quote:
(he has already informed me that the next time I think he requires medical care, one of us might die...)


Jeez - I've just got this message from Poss-cat, after Tuesday's vet visit! Boy - did my BP go up!
ossobuco
 
  0  
Reply Thu 19 Mar, 2009 08:55 pm
@margo,
Hello? (not specifically to Margo)

A lot of us on a2k deal with blood pressure issues. Could we keep it as a subject separate from our pets' needs for the moment? Or start a thread re pets?
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2009 06:09 am
Why is it, that when you read other people's descriptions of symptoms, you suddenly realize that you have them, too? Wink
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2009 09:35 pm
@msolga,
Sooo.... this is just a sign of getting older - we all go through it?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2009 09:43 pm
@littlek,
Sorry I was crabby about the cat stuff.. apologies.

I don't know about all. But one of my long time friends, a p.e. major in college and an RN, long distance cyclist, routine runner as in, um, say, 35 miles a week, serious hiker (we are soooo different: she'll stop and climb a mountain on casual driving trips), major good cook with an eye to nutrition, fresh veggies from own garden, bla bla, not an ounce of chub - got wildly high blood pressure in her forties. Hereditary, apparently, in her case.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2009 09:51 pm
Mine didn't show up until my early/mid sixties. A novelty I'd rather not have.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2009 10:13 pm
My family history is mixed. My dad's side has high BP, my mom's side low BP. My bro went on BP meds in his teens, my dad in his 50s. As of yet, I have trended more like my mom.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2009 10:41 pm
@littlek,
So did you have a highish bp at a doctor's visit? Situational anxiety can bump up normal.

I haven't looked into normal rises and falls of bp with exertion. but there must be data out there on that.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Mar, 2009 05:56 pm
@littlek,
Quote:
Sooo.... this is just a sign of getting older - we all go through it


Could be, k.

Yep, we're all getting older every day!

And eventually we're all gonna die!Shocked


But seriously, this has been a very interesting & informative read. Thanks, farmer, for all that information.

0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Mar, 2009 05:13 pm
canada's public health agency considers a BP reading of 139/89 as "high normal" and recommends an annual recheck for otherwise healthy individuals .
my usual BP is in the 120's over the 70's - but will sometimes go to 140/80 .
i take a "water pill" daily and our physician checks my BP usually once a month (mrs usually has a completely normal reading - pretty good for her age) .
our physician does not believe in taking PB readings too often since they apparently do put some stress on our bodies .
hbg


Quote:
Normal blood pressure
Blood pressure is normal when the higher number is below 130 and the lower number is below 85. For example, 125 over 80 (125/80) is normal blood pressure.

High normal blood pressure
Blood pressure between 130/85 and 139/89 is high normal and should be rechecked every year.

High blood pressure
Blood pressure of 140/90 or over is high.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Mar, 2009 05:47 pm
@hamburger,
Thanks Hamburger. What's a water pill?
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Mar, 2009 05:56 pm
@littlek,
littlek :

waterpill = diuretic
a/t latest studies they are still the best in controlling "ordinary" high BP .
pharma corporations don't make much money on them - they only cost a few pennies - so they prefer it when your doctor prescribes a much more expensive med with a fancy name .
hbg

Quote:
The largest hypertension study ever conducted has found that the simple "water pill" is preferred to newer, more popular and expensive drugs and should be the designated choice "for use in starting treatment for high blood pressure."


But what if you're among the 24 million Americans taking other types medications to manage hypertension? Should you talk to your doctor of switching to a diuretic (water pill), whose use has dwindled in recent decades with the introduction of newer drugs?


"Yes," says the lead researcher of this landmark study, called ALLHAT for the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial.


"The bottom line of our study is that diuretics should be considered as the first step for treating all new cases of hypertension," Barry R. Davis, MD, PhD, of the University of Texas School of Public Health, tells WebMD. "But diuretics should also be part of every hypertensive regimen."


Davis adds that while the study findings recommend using diuretics to start treatment of high blood pressure, it shouldn't be interpreted to suggest that only newly diagnosed patients would benefit from them.


"The way the clinical trail was conducted, 90% of the study participants had been on some type of medication [before the study], and their medication was stopped and they were switched to four different drugs in randomized fashion -- including the diuretic," he says. "And those taking the diuretics, which are much less expensive, fared as good or better."


Plus, they don't cause any additional side effects than the other drugs -- typically increased urination that subsides after several weeks, and sometimes dizziness, muscle weakness, and cramps. "In rare cases, someone can't take them because they may be allergic to them," says Davis. "But for the average patient, they are the better choice. So if you are on another medication and your blood pressure is not controlled, and another medication has to be added, as is often the case, it should be a diuretic."


The results of the eight-year ALLHAT trial, released recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association, brings new attention to this old standard in blood pressure treatment, which works by ridding the body of excess salt and water. The generic diuretic used in the study, chlorthalidone, was deemed a better choice than two other types of treatments that can cost as much as 30 times more --- the ACE inhibitors Prinivil or Zestril and the calcium channel blocker Norvasc. A third medication, the alpha-blocker Cardura, was dropped from the study some two years ago because it increased the risk of heart disease and stroke in study participants.

The diuretic was found to be better at lowering systolic blood pressure -- the top number in a blood pressure reading -- than the newer drugs, but Norvasc was more effective in reducing diastolic blood pressure, the bottom number. However, those taking Norvasc had a 38% higher risk of developing heart failure and a 35% higher chance of being hospitalized for the condition. Meanwhile, those on the ACE inhibitor had a 15% higher risk of stroke, a 19% higher risk of developing heart failure, and other increased risks compared with people taking a diuretic.



link :
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=51967
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Mar, 2009 07:08 pm
Wouldn't taking a daily diuretic dehydrate you?
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Mar, 2009 09:18 pm
@littlek,
littlek wrote:

What's a water pill?

My wife currently takes this. A big fancy, hard-to-say name:
Hydrochlorothazid for 25 mg.

She was using Accupril some time back. Her blood pressure got better, so she got down to a 12.5 mg Hydro pill, but it's worsened some and know dosage is up.

The Accupril is a much stronger medication and tends to be harder on your internal organs.

And, yes, you need to drink lots of water, which she's supposed to do anyways.
0 Replies
 
 

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