20
   

I think I met Miller yesterday

 
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 12:18 pm
Well, I'm glad the pissing matches are over and we can anticipate good news about Wally's recovery at home.

BBB
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 12:30 pm
@wandeljw,
ok..I'd say I'm dropping it as well, but that would be redundant and calling additonal attention to it.

I do want to say my thoughts and prayers are with Mr. Chai and Chai, as well. I empathise and sympathize for what he's going through. I especially can identify as I have a defib-pacemaker implanted 6 yrs ago for my severe arrhythmia brought on from obstuctive cardiomopathy. As a point of info, to those who may not know, this (mostly non-invasice) procedure goes smoothly 99% of the time.

That being said, a nightmare scenario can occur if the feedback loop (with connection) is interrupted and the logic in the defib senses through the software and the lead that the heart is not beating within the safe limitations. The fact that it did this repeatedly is ONE of the worst possible scenarios. The absolute worst is it not firing at all when your heart falls outside of the "safe" parameters. To be shocked once is not fun, to be shocked repatedly all the way to the hospital...I just can't imagine it.

Problems can arise after implantation for those who are very active and if they lift a lot as they may tear the lead which attaches to this AV node of the heart muscle. The body, in its infinite wisdom, after healing, starts to cover over the lead with tissue over a period of time. Sometimes people who are in construction and in the building trades are more prone to tearing this lead (lifting left arm over the head). A minor outpatient procedure reconnects the lead with no huge hassle. While I was in having my first unit implanted a contruction worker was in having his lead reconnected.

FYI, every 3.5-6 yrs , you get a new unit implanted as the battery runs out.
It is the common medical practice to replace the unit rather than just swapping the the batteries out. This is often done as an outpatient surgery in 6 -8 hrs if the lead does not have to be replaced. In some cases, they'll hold you overnight for observation. My last was done in oupatient surgery as they used the same lead as it was tested as 100% relaible (not one of the defective, easily-fratured ones in the news).

Anyhow all this is info for those wondering about the reliability and effectivenss and procesdure that is donw to implant and live with defib- pacemakers.

And, once again, my sincerest sympathies go out to Mr. Chai in this very scarey series of events. One shock can be tolerable, but several non-stop shocks is what I consider one VERY bad hair day. Wink Wink
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 12:34 pm
@Ragman,
Good information, Ragman. Thanks. I had forgotten but now I remember that you had cardiac surgeries also. I hope you are doing okay.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 12:40 pm
@wandeljw,
wandel: thanks for recalling my circumstances. My life goes on fairly normally (normal is relative term) as I take meds (beta blockers) and this keeps things fairly in check. I can't jog much and don't long distance biking as I used to, but I can do brisk walking and about 95% of what I was used to. I have no blockage due to plaque or any arterial issues, thankfully. Mine was a congenital issue..probably waiting 'til I hit the magic 50.

I fear nothing..except a lighted match (as quoted from the scarecrow in Wiz of Oz).

Here's wishing that Wally soon has the same normalcy once again. I'm sure his situation is far more complicated than mine was.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 02:04 pm
@wandeljw,
oops..I have a correction. Lead replacement is more than likely an overnight stay after the surgery. They do need you overnight as they test the unit defib capability (zap) in the morning while you're under sedation. You dfeel notbhing as your sedated. They then keep you around for the day for recoup and observation.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 02:32 pm
Well, thanks everybody for your concern. I truly do appreciate it.

He'll be in the hospital at least another night, maybe 2.

He got a blood clot logged in his arm and it swelled up to the size of popeye's.

They did tests on him today and they found he was bleeding from behind his defibrillator, so first they'll stop that, then they'll desolve the blood clot. I'm sure it'll all be fine, but the doctor said "I'm in no rush to see him go home". His pain's diminished significantly and now he's getting bored.

I in no way intended this thread to be anything about Miller. Just as shewolf said, I used that name because it brings an instant, apparantly common idea to mind. I think rocky said it best when he said "she's a big girl" The same way I know what I'm like, she knows what she's like, for sure.

All I can say is, in hindsight I should of named this thread "I think I met Nurse Rackett today."

Not to scare you dag...it is supposed to be a routine operation, and I hope your dad will be fine. I'm glad ragman's procedures were uneventful.

I have no idea why, but everytime something is done to Wally, it's never a textbook procedure, something goes wrong, even if it's something small. Compared to other things, this is small.

shewolf, I wish we had pm's.

actually I wish we had pm's, because there's so many people I've wanted to say something to. Not about this, but just talk.

I really miss pm's.

Robert, I know you're a good person, thinking about your response, all I can come up with is that you're a much more literal person than I am.

I live in a world of metaphors. Like wandell said, when he says someone pulled a gus, or a kicky can.

BTW, the nurse last night was really good. Most of them are.
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 02:40 pm
@chai2,
Chai wrote:
BTW, the nurse last night was really good. Most of them are.


Very true, Chai, and I am glad Wally is feeling better.

I have had a few experiences with insensitive or arrogant health care people, but I can count them all on one hand. Most health care workers treat patients well or maybe if they are tough with us, it is only when necessary.
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 02:41 pm
thanks, chai, he is ok so far. 3 days after surgery the old fool (77 years old to be exact) drove himself to the mountains (4 hour ride) and stayed there for a week to 'recuperate'.... at least i know who's genes i got. he's a silly, stubborn, yet wonderfully spontanneous and creative geezer. it went as well as it can, except he said it was extremely uncomfortable (not painful) when they were pulling the old apparatus out and putting the new in, some sort of concentrated pressure. he got to keep the old machine, which is apparently a shiny plate with INTEGRITY inscribed on it. He offered it to me as jewelry. I will get it for Christmas :-) It certainly helps that he laughs everything off and we learned it, too, but the older he gets, the more I worry...sort of in a non-stop way. It was intermittent before. Sigh.
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 02:58 pm
@dagmaraka,
oh, and i'll get to see him tomorrow. going home for the weekend.
i'll think of you when i will enjoy his company over the weekend.
Lambchop
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 02:27 pm
@chai2,
I'm glad your husband's feeling better, and I hope he gets to come home soon. I'm also glad he has someone who loves him so much.

I'll bet he really loves you too.
0 Replies
 
Izzie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 02:55 pm
@chai2,
Hey Chai

Hope hubby will get stronger and come home soon. Try and rest when you can Chai.

Glad Mr.T had good nurse last nite. In my experience, I have only had one "sister"... who... if I could have - would have readily decked her when she told me I couldn't possibly be in the pain I said I was after surgery. pfffffffffffsttttt - 'til they had to cut the "too tight" plaster off and replaster!!!!! But hey, one out of a million... so, hoping any future nurses will be as good as they usually are and you and Mr.T won't have further bad experiences with them. Most of them are angels.

Take care Chai of Mr.T and yourself. x

0 Replies
 
Izzie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 03:38 pm
@dagmaraka,
Have a lovely time Dag. Hugs gal. x
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Nov, 2008 11:03 am
For anyone that's curious, I just brought Wally home.

A procedure that was supposed to involve an overnight stay ended up lasting 1 week. Went in last Monday, home on Sunday.

The last few days were for observation to make sure the swelling in his arm went down, and how the blood thinner was working, but still it's no fun sitting in a hospital.
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Nov, 2008 01:03 pm
@chai2,
I am glad he is home Chai - I know you both will be more comfortable. So sorry it took as long as it did. Hope to hear that he continues to improve - Thanks for letting us know.
mis
0 Replies
 
mac11
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Nov, 2008 01:16 pm
@chai2,
Chai, I'm glad you've got Wally home again. Please keep us posted.
0 Replies
 
Izzie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Nov, 2008 01:17 pm
@chai2,
So pleased he is home with you. Take care Chai and thanku for letting us know. x
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Nov, 2008 01:17 pm
@chai2,
Chai- I know how traumatic it is to see a loved one suffering in a hospital. I am glad Wally is home, and you can start getting your lives back to as normal as possible.
0 Replies
 
martybarker
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Nov, 2008 03:38 pm
Chai,
So glad to hear your honey is on his way to feeling better. Ican only imagine how hard that experience was for both of you.

As far as the wicked nurse, it's unfortunate that there are HC workers that give the rest of us a bad image. I see myself as a compassionate person and hope that having a bad day or lack of sleep doesn't seem apparent to my patients.

As far as Miller goes, there are HC workers that know just enough to be dangerous. And what I mean by that is that some people have a peripheral view of things but aren't the expert in them, therefore feel obligated to comment on them.

I have a sister who is a respiratory therapist but has my parents convinced that she knows everthing about their health. I've caught her babbling about things that I actually have a lot of knowledge about. I also have a brother that is a RN who had years of critical care background.

Recently we've had a talk with our parents and have told them that they have many resources available to them, not just one.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Nov, 2008 05:19 am
@chai2,
Great news that he's home.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Nov, 2008 10:14 am
At last!

BBB
 

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