46
   

Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic

 
 
hamburgboy
 
  3  
Reply Tue 20 Dec, 2011 04:10 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
journalists and all other scribes better learn these new spelling rules :

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-16255972

Quote:
Virgin Media's electronic programme guide's filter has gone into overdrive.

Over recent days, subscribers to the firm's TV and radio services have been offered the highlights of the "Manchester City v A***nal" game and "Jarvis C**ker's Sunday Service".

Meanwhile, movie lovers could tune into The 39 Steps, a "Hitchc**k remake".

In a statement, a Virgin Media spokeswoman said: "The altered titles have been swiftly an*lysed and we're fixing any remaining glitches."

The firm blamed an "overzealous profanity checker" for the fault.

Subscribers have been posting screenshots of the mistakes on Twitter.

Other examples include the Will Smith movie "Hanc**k", the panel show "Never Mind the Buzzc**ks" and the The Bleak Old Shop Of Stuff, a "Charles D***ens" spoof.


     http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/57419000/jpg/_57419652_vmedia.jpg
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2011 05:26 am
@hamburgboy,
I saw that, what a laugh.

They also said the couldn't refer to the well-liked TV programme "The Golden Age of Canals".

Yes, it took me a while to find it, too.

Whoops, edit, it's in the black box, sorry.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 12:19 am
@Artificial,
Artificial wrote:
Secondly, I definitely do not vouch for a "freedom of spelling", if I may use that term. The spelling and the shape of words are formed in a way that allows foreigners and Englishmen alike to understand the meaning.


I don't support the "freedom of spelling" idea either, but I do think that it's not nearly as important an issue as it used to be (e.g. can learn by spellcheck instead of rote), and also do not agree that English spelling is as well-formed as you seem to think it is.

Quote:
Especially when you have the homonyms in place.

He held back the queue.
He held back the cue.


Those aren't homonyms (homonyms are spelled the same), they are homophones.
0 Replies
 
Dixie Swnason
 
  2  
Reply Fri 24 Aug, 2012 10:40 am
@Robert Gentel,
this reminds me of the old joke...

A young Englishman asks his father, "Father, must a gentleman know Greek?"

"It is sufficient to have forgotten it."

Spelling is necessary, lest spell check let stand a word that means completely different than what the author intended -- could have serious legal and medical consequences.

In medicine the different between hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism are night and day. Precision in language is required in a number of professions and therefore, spelling must be taught in the lower grades.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Aug, 2012 10:48 am
@Dixie Swnason,
Dixie Swnason wrote:

this reminds me of the old joke...

A young Englishman asks his father, "Father, must a gentleman know Greek?"

"It is sufficient to have forgotten it."

Spelling is necessary, lest spell check let stand a word that means completely different than what the author intended -- could have serious legal and medical consequences.

In medicine the different between hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism are night and day. Precision in language is required in a number of professions and therefore,


spelling must be taught in the lower grades.
Yes; FONETIC SPELLING!





David
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Mar, 2013 09:58 pm
Spelling and grammar only matter if you want to be understood. It might not matter if your goal is to have a career as professional batboy. If my doctor, lawyer, or accountant didn't know the difference between "no or know" I'd be looking for new people.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Mar, 2013 03:10 pm
@glitterbag,
Quote:
Spelling and grammar only matter if you want to be understood.


Doctors, lawyers, accountants and everyone else makes no/know mistakes. A2K is full of its/it's; their/there; ... .

But the "grammar" you were taught, GB, is like the Greek in the post a few before this one.

"It is sufficient to have forgotten it."
0 Replies
 
vjean
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jul, 2013 02:25 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter, that just made me laugh. Maybe it shouldn't be spelling rules that should be abandoned. Just maybe--teachers should abandon those spelling tests that could give unjustified pressure on the kids, who could be spending more time under pressure on things that just 'logically' or maybe 'rationally' matter. There are always all sorts of writings where teachers can red-slash misspelled words.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jul, 2013 03:00 pm
@vjean,
This,

Quote:
He should try saying that to the editor of a newspaper on which I once worked. Every week we got a pile of job applications and there was a simple rule: if they contained a single spelling mistake, they went straight in the bin.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1054092/Dont-stoopid-spelling-matters.html#ixzz2Ylxl1TRd


also made me really laugh. This would be one of those same editors who have been defending garbage rules about the English language for centuries.

If there were never any spelling mistakes in his daily newspaper, he would be out of a job, except to provide "corrections" to his journalists for using English in a completely natural fashion.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jul, 2013 03:18 pm
Quote:
heres only wun problem if there not gunna teach kids how to spell there own language and use the apostrophe. No one will have a klew wot there on about, innit?

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1054092/Dont-stoopid-spelling-matters.html#ixzz2Ym1qydrZ


Illustrative of just how little these prescriptive types think before they blab their ignorance all over the pages of a major newspaper or a Pet Peeves of English thread.

I understood it all perfectly, the first time I read it, with no hesitation.

0 Replies
 
jcb31
 
  0  
Reply Sat 21 Feb, 2015 02:18 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Peple nevor noticer grammer erreors
timur
 
  2  
Reply Sat 21 Feb, 2015 02:20 pm
@jcb31,
However, they notice when you are almost two years late to the discussion..
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 21 Feb, 2015 02:46 pm
@timur,
Quote:
However, they notice when you are almost two years late to the discussion..


Timma, aincha nevva herdz a no Albit Instine? He say simultaneity be "relative." Dat meenz dat iffin I jizt seen diz heea tred, den it jizt got rit.

Diz heea don meen no kinda nuthin: "Thu 11 Jul, 2013 03:18 pm"
timur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Feb, 2015 02:55 pm
@layman,
Your prolepsis is a jocular sally..
0 Replies
 
fleapit
 
  2  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 05:28 am
@Robert Gentel,
The European Commission has at last agreed that English will be the official language of Europe, rather than German, which until now has been a strong contender. In recognition of this the British government has agreed to the following improvements to the language, which will be introduced over a five year period. In the first year s will replace the soft c. This will sertainly make sivil servants happy. The hard c will be dropped in favour of k. This will reduse konfusion and keyboards will need one less letter. There will be growing enthusiasm in the sekond year, when the troublesome ph will be replased by f; this will make words like fotograf 20 per sent shorter. In the third year publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reash the stage where more komplikated shanges are possible. Governments will enkourage the removal of double leters, wish has always ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes of the silent e in the languag is disgrasful and should be don away with. By the fourth year peopl will be reseptiv to steps sush as replasing th with z and w with v. During the fifz year ze unesesary o can be droped from words containing ou, and similar shanges vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters. After zis fifz yer ve vil hav a sinsibl riten styl. Zer wil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech ozer. Ze drem vil finali kum tru!
gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 07:07 am
@fleapit,
shanges and ozer don't work. They should adopt the use of 'c' to mean 'ch' as in Italian, and reclaim the theta character or whatever it was in old English for 'th', those both are separate sounds and not diphthongs.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 07:16 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:
They should adopt the use of 'c' to mean 'ch' as in Italian,
That's only if the c is followed by an I or an E, at least in Italy and Italian taught in Europe.
gungasnake
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2017 03:46 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
When you don't really have anything meaningful to say, there is always the option of remaining silent.....
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2017 01:08 am
@fleapit,
fleapit wrote:

The European Commission has at last agreed that English will be the official language of Europe, rather than German, which until now has been a strong contender. In recognition of this the British government has agreed to the following improvements to the language, which will be introduced over a five year period. In the first year s will replace the soft c. This will sertainly make sivil servants happy. The hard c will be dropped in favour of k. This will reduse konfusion and keyboards will need one less letter. There will be growing enthusiasm in the sekond year, when the troublesome ph will be replased by f; this will make words like fotograf 20 per sent shorter. In the third year publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reash the stage where more komplikated shanges are possible. Governments will enkourage the removal of double leters, wish has always ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes of the silent e in the languag is disgrasful and should be don away with. By the fourth year peopl will be reseptiv to steps sush as replasing th with z and w with v. During the fifz year ze unesesary o can be droped from words containing ou, and similar shanges vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters. After zis fifz yer ve vil hav a sinsibl riten styl. Zer wil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech ozer. Ze drem vil finali kum tru!



That's quite clever, Flea. Did you plagiarize it?
0 Replies
 
 

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