18
   

High-Fructose Corn Syrup: Safe as sugar?

 
 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Oct, 2008 06:33 am
@Robert Gentel,
http://highfructosehigh.com/no-hfcs/

List of HFCS- free foods
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Oct, 2008 10:44 am
I just discovered this thread - very interesting and informative. I am a label reader and I always look for the sodium and sugar content. I hardly buy any
juices except for orange juice that's not from concentrate. We drink water
and mineral water.

shewolf,
I agree with your findings that the poor people buy the most junk, but they're
mostly Americans. The poor Mexicans here buy rice, beans and onions in bulk,
they buy tomatoes, cilantro, corn tacos/tortillas, cheese and sometimes beef or
pork. All these food items are healthy and nutritious and don't cost much.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Oct, 2008 11:00 am
@CalamityJane,
it has been shown over and over again that cheap can be healthy...ALL indigent immigrants buy cheap but healthy. They are not under the influence of the corporate propaganda from the American food industry, the ones who who push the manufactured crap. There is no profit for them in pushing good unadulterated food because they make their money by processing the good stuff into something else, so they don't.
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Oct, 2008 12:40 pm
@littlek,
from liitlek's post :

Quote:
Some experts have proposed that people metabolize high fructose corn syrup in a way that raises the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes more than sugar made from sugar cane. Much of the controversy stems from the observation that obesity in the United States and consumption of high fructose corn syrup increased at the same time.


imo it's all a matter of HOW MUCH sugar one consumes . even honey - supposedly better than sugar - is NOT good when too much of it is consumed .
it's all a matter of moderation and balance imo .
hbg

0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Oct, 2008 02:46 pm
@cicerone imposter,
c.i. wrote :

Quote:
When I was a kid, I used to put sugar on bread to eat it like candy; I was immediately hooked.


while i grew up with plenty of good food , being allowed to have a "sugar-sandwich" was certainly a treat i enjoyed as a kid . spreading "artificial honey" (kunsthonig in german - sounds so much better , doesn't it ?) on our bread was also DELISH !
hbg
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Oct, 2008 03:37 pm
@hamburger,
I can tell only mismi looked at my link.
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Oct, 2008 06:20 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobucco writes :

Quote:
Re: hamburger (Post 3425419)
I can tell only mismi looked at my link.


i only now looked at the link - i was really just adding to c.i.'s remark .

so this is what i read at the end of the professor's article :

Quote:
I'm not a registered dietitian and maybe that is why I think moderation doesn't work for HFCS. Yes, HFCS has a place in the American diet and sometimes has cooking advantages over sucrose. And the research is still out on whether HFCS differs from sucrose metabolically. But the most sensible approach to HFCS and to sugars in general is not moderation. It is, "Eat less."


isn't "eating less" to be "moderate" in food consumption ?
i am assuming that HFCS is not poison to the average healthy person .

i found this in merriam webster :

Quote:
moderate : avoiding extremes (of behavior or expression) : observing reasonable limits .


my guess is that it also applies to our eating habits : avoid extremes , observe resonable limits .
if i already am reasonable in my eating habits , why would i even have to eat less ?
(surely , we don't want people to be underweight , do we ?)

as always , looking forward to your comments .
hbg


0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Oct, 2008 05:12 pm
Quote:
Just this month, researchers from Loyola University’s Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago took a look at the link between kidney disease and high-fructose corn syrup. Using data from nearly 9,400 adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2004, they tracked consumption of sugary soft drinks, a major source of high-fructose corn syrup in the United States, and protein in the urine, a sensitive marker for kidney disease. They found that overall, people who drank two or more sugary sodas a day were at 40 percent higher risk for kidney damage, while the risk for women soda drinkers nearly doubled.

In June, the Journal of Hepatology suggested a link between consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in sodas and fatty liver disease.

And this summer, a small study published in The Journal of Nutrition suggested that fructose may make people fatter by bypassing the body’s regulation of sugars, which means it gets more quickly converted to fat than do other sugars.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/10/30/still-spooked-by-high-fructose-corn-syrup/?hp
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Oct, 2008 04:03 am
@hawkeye10,
My my my ain't that interesting.

Thanks for the link.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 08:45 pm
Quote:
You may have noticed lately that your morning coffee tastes slightly more bitter than usual. It may have something to do with a 15 million-ton sugar shortage in the face of global demand. In Europe, that’s meant a steep price increase – from 550 euros per ton in August 2010, to 900 euros per ton this year.
The most common reason cited for the current supply shortage are weather problems in Mexico, Australia and, most importantly, in Brazil, the world’s top producer. Also mentioned as contributing factors are the use of sugar cane for biofuels and increased demand in emerging countries. The situation is so bad right now that the International Sugar Organization announced that even with a good 2011/2012 harvest, sugar stocks will not return to levels considered “healthy.”
There is one other major factor affecting world’s sugar supply: the surprising end of the long romance between American consumers and high-fructose corn syrup, or HFCS, a sweetener often used in the food industry to replace cane or beet sugar. Growing evidence has linked HFCS to obesity and diabetes. For health reasons, in other words, food producers in the United States are beginning to wean themselves off the corn-based sweetener.
“Growing concern among consumers about high-fructose corn syrup, which is made from government-subsidized corn, is forcing producers, especially soft drink makers, to go back to cane and beet sugar,” says Euromonitor, a market research firm. “This tendency away from HFCS is another factor pushing up prices.”
The United States is not self-sufficient when it comes to cane sugar. Further complicating matters was the recent disastrous harvest in Mexico, which left U.S. producers without their principal provider. Theoretically, the situation could benefit Nicaragua and Guatemala. The problem there, however, is that unlike Mexico, these countries aren’t part of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), meaning their exports are subject to quotas and tariffs.
That could change. Euromonitor reports that the U.S. Department of Agriculture said in August that it is considering relaxing import barriers in an effort to close the supply gap.


http://www.worldcrunch.com/biofuels-and-obesity-stir-worldwide-sugar-shortage-crank-prices/3942

You might also have noticed that HFCS is increasingly being renamed....I noticed something the other day where it was changed to "corn syrup"....and there was a story about a month ago where manufactures are lobbying the government for some new strange name in the attempt to throw consumers off the scent.


I have certainly noticed sugar prices are up, and we in America always have very expensive sugar to begin with because of import restrictions.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 08:52 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

it has been shown over and over again that cheap can be healthy...ALL indigent immigrants buy cheap but healthy. They are not under the influence of the corporate propaganda from the American food industry, the ones who who push the manufactured crap. There is no profit for them in pushing good unadulterated food because they make their money by processing the good stuff into something else, so they don't.


Beans and rice are healthy as hell. It's fair to say tho that it can be hard to eat fresh fruits and vegetables, seasonally, on the cheap.

Cycloptichorn
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 08:59 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Quote:
Beans and rice are healthy as hell. It's fair to say tho that it can be hard to eat fresh fruits and vegetables, seasonally, on the cheap.
Dont try to tell the that to the victim culture promoters.. according to them if inner city folk can't get fresh arugula with-in 6 blocks then they are being abused, they are being forced to eat double cheese burgers three meals a day presumably because of their race, and require government assistance to right the wrong.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 09:26 pm
@hawkeye10,
As an aside but relevant.. Mid 1990's we were living in Darmstadt Germany and the asians were just starting to move in but there was only one small Asian food store (expensive) because while the Germans had about 10 years before discovered asian food they were not about to cook it. Germans at the time would to go an asian restaurant to get their fix. Well, this certainly does not work for the newly settled asian families. What they did was to set up an informal cooperative of about 50 families as I recall. They would pool their money and every other week they would rent a truck and go up to Frankfurt to get asian food wholesale (from the place where the restaurants got it), bring it back, park in a parking lot at the predetermined time and the families would come around to get their share. I think two or three women would meet the truck and start breaking down the big cases of stuff, looking at a list to see who was supposed to get what, and organize piles to make pick-up easy.

OK, so inner city people dont have cars. ...maybe the truck would need to go around and deliver....but the point is that even if they have little money and even if the stuff they want is far away inner city folk aught to be able to organize an effort to get the need met. If they started to truck in a lot of fresh veggies somebody or another is going to figure out that there is money to be made by opening a produce stand or several in the ghetto.

I am unsympathetic to the sob story that inner city folk are eating crap and are in bad health because of racism. If they eat crap it is by choice.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 11:20 pm
@hawkeye10,
Bah. Another correlative study that makes people think there's a direct cause.

Did they rule out other dietary factors?

I'm just winging it here, but do you think there's a possibility that people who drink sodas might also exhibit other behaviors that are unhealthy?
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 11:26 pm
@DrewDad,
I am more interested that the Sugar lobby has been so successful yet again....who would have thunk that they could take on the corn farmers and win, without having the science to prove their assertions??

I think they have been able to keep the US price at some think like 130% of the global price by getting the Government to place a high tariff on imports, something that is very rare these days. These boys are very good at what they do.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 01:00 am
@hawkeye10,
It appears that the government not only puts a stiff tariff on sugar but also limits imports, thus skewing the supply and demand equation on favor of the producers. I see some site claim that we pay 180% of the global price because of government actions, but I am not sure how correct that number is.
0 Replies
 
 

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