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If McCain Wins the Republican Primaries!

 
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:06 pm
Phoenix32890 wrote:
I have a fantasy where McCain runs, with Giuliani as his running mate.[/color][/b]


In my fantasy, McCain has either Giuliani or Fred Thompson as his running mate.
0 Replies
 
mysteryman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:09 pm
Ticomaya wrote:
Phoenix32890 wrote:
I have a fantasy where McCain runs, with Giuliani as his running mate.[/color][/b]


In my fantasy, McCain has either Giuliani or Fred Thompson as his running mate.


Is there any law that says the VP running mate has to be of the same party?

I would love to see McCain take as his running mate Evan Bayh (D-IN).
That is a ticket I would vote for in a heartbeat.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:09 pm
Gargamel wrote:
Asherman wrote:
Obama's strength is generally among the idealistic young, racial/ethnic minorities, and those who demand "change"; no matter what the changes might be, nor how much they might cost in terms of treasure of national security. Both are long on promises, but short on concrete plans that the electorate can use as comparisons.


You're voting for McCain and yet feel qualified to speak for young people? Interesting. I think it's pretty clear what kind of change we demand and anticipate, out of any candidate, really. Deciphering "what the changes might be" merely requires reading. I don't see McCain laying out any more-specific plans than any other candidate on either side. Though I'll exclude the nebulous, whatever-you-guys-want Romney from that point.


Why shouldn't he presume to speak for the young? You apparently feel qualified to speak for everyone.

History shows rather clearly that the various competing "plans" the candidates put forward for hotly contested issues don't really mean much. They are at most debating points. It is the Congress that legislates.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:10 pm
McCain's problem is that Republicans in general... haven't really supported him all that much. And I suspect he will not excite many to do so from here on out.

From The Corner:

Quote:
McCain's Inside Straight


Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:10 pm
Gargamel wrote:
You're voting for McCain and yet feel qualified to speak for young people? Interesting. I think it's pretty clear what kind of change we demand and anticipate, out of any candidate, really. Deciphering "what the changes might be" merely requires reading.


.... which is not something "young people" are really high on, unless it's a myspace page.

Now a youtube video ... that's the medium that will best carry the message to the "young people."
0 Replies
 
woiyo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:16 pm
Cycloptichorn wrote:
McCain's problem is that Republicans in general... haven't really supported him all that much. And I suspect he will not excite many to do so from here on out.

From The Corner:

Quote:
McCain's Inside Straight


Cycloptichorn


If the repubs think he can win, they will support him.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:17 pm
woiyo wrote:
Cycloptichorn wrote:
McCain's problem is that Republicans in general... haven't really supported him all that much. And I suspect he will not excite many to do so from here on out.

From The Corner:

Quote:
McCain's Inside Straight


Cycloptichorn


If the repubs think he can win, they will support him.


They might hold their nose and do so, but it's going to take a lot more then that to beat the Dems this cycle, and I think that you know it.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
woiyo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:22 pm
Cycloptichorn wrote:
woiyo wrote:
Cycloptichorn wrote:
McCain's problem is that Republicans in general... haven't really supported him all that much. And I suspect he will not excite many to do so from here on out.

From The Corner:

Quote:
McCain's Inside Straight


Cycloptichorn


If the repubs think he can win, they will support him.


They might hold their nose and do so, but it's going to take a lot more then that to beat the Dems this cycle, and I think that you know it.

Cycloptichorn


Yea, it might take more than holding ones nose to beat the Democrats.

We will know more after next Tuesday, but I just do not think that Hillary is electable, Obama just might be.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:24 pm
woiyo wrote:
Cycloptichorn wrote:
woiyo wrote:
Cycloptichorn wrote:
McCain's problem is that Republicans in general... haven't really supported him all that much. And I suspect he will not excite many to do so from here on out.

From The Corner:

Quote:
McCain's Inside Straight


Cycloptichorn


If the repubs think he can win, they will support him.


They might hold their nose and do so, but it's going to take a lot more then that to beat the Dems this cycle, and I think that you know it.

Cycloptichorn


Yea, it might take more than holding ones nose to beat the Democrats.

We will know more after next Tuesday, but I just do not think that Hillary is electable, Obama just might be.


We are in agreement. I think that Dems have more to work towards even if they don't like Hillary, though, as there is a massive push to put a Dem of any kind in the WH after all those years of Bush.

We'll see tho


Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:46 pm
Cycloptichorn wrote:
McCain's problem is that Republicans in general... haven't really supported him all that much. And I suspect he will not excite many to do so from here on out.Cycloptichorn


Well despite all the questionable "analysis" of the pundits and self-appointed experts, he is the Republican's leading candidate so far.

I am quite confident of the ability of either Hillary or Obama to sufficiently motivate Republican voters who might have favored other Republican candidates. In the same vein I believe disaffected Edwards supporters will somehow find a way to vote for either Obama or Hillary.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 01:56 pm
georgeob1 wrote:
Cycloptichorn wrote:
McCain's problem is that Republicans in general... haven't really supported him all that much. And I suspect he will not excite many to do so from here on out.Cycloptichorn


Well despite all the questionable "analysis" of the pundits and self-appointed experts, he is the Republican's leading candidate so far.

I am quite confident of the ability of either Hillary or Obama to sufficiently motivate Republican voters who might have favored other Republican candidates. In the same vein I believe disaffected Edwards supporters will somehow find a way to vote for either Obama or Hillary.


Hillary I understand, but Obama? I suppose you haven't been paying attention, b/c many Republicans like the guy. And his approval ratings amongst Republicans are better then Hillary's, by far!

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 02:17 pm
Republicans who have expressed (to me) a preferance for Obama over Hillary have done so because they believe Obama will be easier to beat. They could be proven wrong of course. However, this suggests that perhaps you should guard against becoming the principal consumer of your own propaganda.
0 Replies
 
woiyo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 02:20 pm
georgeob1 wrote:
Republicans who have expressed (to me) a preferance for Obama over Hillary have done so because they believe Obama will be easier to beat. They could be proven wrong of course. However, this suggests that perhaps you should guard against becoming the principal consumer of your own propaganda.


the correct response to those should be "Be careful what you wish for"
0 Replies
 
Gargamel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 02:28 pm
georgeob1 wrote:
Gargamel wrote:
Asherman wrote:
Obama's strength is generally among the idealistic young, racial/ethnic minorities, and those who demand "change"; no matter what the changes might be, nor how much they might cost in terms of treasure of national security. Both are long on promises, but short on concrete plans that the electorate can use as comparisons.


You're voting for McCain and yet feel qualified to speak for young people? Interesting. I think it's pretty clear what kind of change we demand and anticipate, out of any candidate, really. Deciphering "what the changes might be" merely requires reading. I don't see McCain laying out any more-specific plans than any other candidate on either side. Though I'll exclude the nebulous, whatever-you-guys-want Romney from that point.


Why shouldn't he presume to speak for the young? You apparently feel qualified to speak for everyone.

History shows rather clearly that the various competing "plans" the candidates put forward for hotly contested issues don't really mean much. They are at most debating points. It is the Congress that legislates.


Pardon my not realizing that he is in fact a rosy-cheeked lad in his Springtime! How embarrassing for me!

And thank you for pointing out that our government operates under a system of checks and balances. I must have been absent the day that was taught, in third grade.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 02:29 pm
Woyio,
I agree with that. The Obama tide currently appears to be at a flood. However the election is still a long way off and we have already seen a number of changes and reversals - still more are likely.

It is plausible to believe that many who may earnestly prefer Obama to Hillary, or who see in him something refreshing and new, may still stop short of voting for him. While the wisdom of Nicias' speech to the Athenians concerning Alcibiadies, and his suggestion that the people should be wary of putting their fates in the hands of "a young man in a hurry" may not be well known to all, the idea behind it certainly is.
0 Replies
 
Gargamel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 02:31 pm
Ticomaya wrote:
Gargamel wrote:
You're voting for McCain and yet feel qualified to speak for young people? Interesting. I think it's pretty clear what kind of change we demand and anticipate, out of any candidate, really. Deciphering "what the changes might be" merely requires reading.


.... which is not something "young people" are really high on, unless it's a myspace page.

Now a youtube video ... that's the medium that will best carry the message to the "young people."


Actually I prefer politics forums on websites like, what's that one called, A2K? And all the wisdom to be learned from the elder sages there.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 02:32 pm
Gargamel wrote:

Pardon my not realizing that he is in fact a rosy-cheeked lad in his Springtime! How embarrassing for me!

And thank you for pointing out that our government operates under a system of checks and balances. I must have been absent the day that was taught, in third grade.


Glad to learn that you remember these lessons. A pity that you fail to think about them.
0 Replies
 
revel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 02:51 pm
Ticomaya wrote:
revel wrote:
McCain ... is a rabid Iraq war supporter ...


There you go, woiyo. Reason enough to vote for the man. You trust our national security to Obama?


I don't equate our national security and Iraq at all so the question don't apply in that context.

But yes.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 02:52 pm
georgeob1 wrote:
Republicans who have expressed (to me) a preferance for Obama over Hillary have done so because they believe Obama will be easier to beat. They could be proven wrong of course. However, this suggests that perhaps you should guard against becoming the principal consumer of your own propaganda.


I just look at the polls, is all. And listen to what people say. You are free to believe whatever you like about what they really think.

See, when I hear Republicans saying 'I like Obama's willingness to work with us,' I guess I'm foolish to believe them, b/c they are lying, right?

On the other hand, many Democrats were pushing for Mitt Romney - and they were quite up front about why, b/c they thought he would be the easiest to beat, not because he would make a good president.

I wonder who these Republicans you are talking with, are. Who was their favored Republican? It's likely the social conservatives who find more resonance with Obama's message then the big-business, Romney supporters such as yourself.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
revel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2008 03:01 pm
I guess people on both sides do it; but in my part of woods, a lot of republicans really did register democrats during the primaries just so they could vote for a guy they thought would loose. My father-in-law is a good example and my husband is another. (all my in laws are republicans; it makes for some uncomfortable dinners when the talk turns political. One time I even walked out during the Katrina tragedy.) (However; I got my husband turned around and he is now voting for Hillary. Its as far as I can go; he is a bit of a red neck; haven't got em' quite trained out of that yet.)
0 Replies
 
 

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