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Area between the city and the suburbs is called what?

 
 
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 10:42 am
What word would best describe the older neighborhoods of a city that aren't in the inner city but are not the suburbs?

Thanks!
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,951 • Replies: 20
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 10:43 am
Ghettos.
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 10:47 am
Not in my city!

You can add a quarter million dollars to the price of a house just for being in that circle around the city proper.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 10:48 am
Why do you have to have a name for it?

Time was when town or country were sufficient. But no . . . you damned new age hippy-dippy boomers (ha-ha, a pun!) have to put a label on everything!
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 10:56 am
But labels are everything, dahhhhhling. How else would anyone know how expensive my tastes are if I don't advertise it with the proper label?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 10:59 am
Here's four bits (god, the inflation!) . . . find a pay phone and call somebody as shallow as you who cares. Then you two can find a mud puddle and go swimming . . .

Now i lay me down to puke, i pray the Lord the West Coast to nuke . . .
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Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:03 am
citburbs..
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:04 am
You big bully.

I'm kidding.

We're thinking about moving. Mr. B wants to know why I want to live in the "inner city" but I'm trying to explain that I don't. We can't afford that and we can't afford the circle area. There are some really great neighborhoods on the fringe of the circle though. I don't want to get stuck in the suburbs.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:12 am
Suburb is just another label--whether or not you would want to live in a particular neighborhood will not depend upon what someone calls it.

And i sincerely hope you find some place nice to live . . . with all of your shallow boomer friends . . . and leave us normal folks alone.
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:15 am
Around Chicago we have what is referred to as 'collar communities' and 'collar counties', those areas that directly abut to the city. They tend to be more city-like and less suburban. Oak Park and Evanston are typical examples of collar communities here.

You're looking for a word that describes a neighborhood within city limits that is at the collar, right?
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:17 am
How about "bedroom communities?"
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mac11
 
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Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:18 am
I propose that you call it a purlieu. (Sounds fancy, anyway.)

Collar community sounds good too.
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:18 am
Sometimes they're called "shopping malls."
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:19 am
I don't know a word for these neighborhoods, except their own names of 'neighborhoods'. In city planning terms, there may be a name, I maaaaay have seen it written, I read lots of planning type news.... but I'm not remembering any general name right now. Just sayin', to cover, lest I say there ain't no such name and there is.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:20 am
Purlieu has a nice ring...
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:21 am
Setanta, I was kidding about the "lable" thing. What people call it makes no difference to me. And I don't want to be stuck in the suburbs where you have to drive everywhere you want to go.

Where we end up will depend on what school district it is in. The inner area schools rate better than the suburban schools on the east side of the river unless you move to one of the suburban gated type communities.

"Collar" sounds about right -- more urban but not in the city proper. When I lived in Chicago I lived in both the Hyde Park and Lincoln Park areas. I'm talking about that kind of neighborhood. Would that be "collar" or something else?
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:27 am
I'd go with "purlieu" except that "Purlieu will not sing at night."
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:35 am
I was kidding about purlieu, but it seems to have a certain fit.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purlieu
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/purlieu

Me, I'd just say 'like Hyde Park or Lincoln Park', or Westwood or the Palisades or Rancho Park, etc.
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:36 am
Purlieu is nice! I'm afraid I will then have to define purlieu to realtors too though.

Yes, osso, they mostly just go by neighborhood names here. There are hundreds of named neighborhoods here and I don't want to have to name them all when working with someone to find a house.

The neighborhoods are on the purlieu of the city and I'm looking at the purlieu of the neighborhoods.
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2007 11:39 am
HUH! is the common response. ha ha ha...
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