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Talcum powder use bad for health!

 
 
Montana
 
Reply Sun 20 Jul, 2003 11:57 pm
On one of my other threads talcum powder was mentioned and we strayed off the origional subject to talk about health issues concerning talcum powder. Although I don't use it, I thought it was important enough to do some research on the subject and I was concerned with what I found, so I thought the subject was important enough for its own thread since I think everyone should be aware of the health risks involving the use of talcum powder. On that other thread people mentioned that you can still safely use powder as long as it's made with cornstarch.

Here is a link about talcum powder use and its dangers. http://www.preventcancer.com/alerts/talc.htm
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Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 01:04 am
I remember my mom telling me about this as a child. do you know if it's bad because of inhalation? That's the impression I've had all my life.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 02:08 am
From the US National Library of Medicine
and the
National Institutes of Health:

Medical Encyclopedia: talcum powder
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Montana
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 02:38 am
Craven de Kere wrote:
I remember my mom telling me about this as a child. do you know if it's bad because of inhalation? That's the impression I've had all my life.





Yes. I copied this from the link I provided and it is responsible in causing death in many infants due to respiratory complications from inhalation. It's really very shocking. As you can see, it also causes ovarian and lung cancer. I'd like to know why a product like this is available, especially for infant use and why doctors don't warn people about it.







A. Talc is toxic. Talc particles cause tumors in human ovaries and lungs. Numerous studies have shown a strong link between frequent use of talc in the female genital area and ovarian cancer. Talc particles are able to move through the reproductive system and become imbedded in the lining of the ovary. Researchers have found talc particles in ovarian tumors and have found that women with ovarian cancer have used talcum powder in their genital area more frequently than healthy women.2

Talc poses a health risk when exposed to the lungs. Talc miners have shown higher rates of lung cancer and other respiratory illnesses from exposure to industrial grade talc, which contains dangerous silica and asbestos. The common household hazard posed by talc is inhalation of baby powder by infants. Since the early 1980s, records show that several thousand infants each year have died or become seriously ill following accidental inhalation of baby powder.3
0 Replies
 
Montana
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 02:43 am
Thank you for the link Walter. The same link that was provided by hamburger on my other thread where we started on the subject along with other people's input was what got me to start a thread on the subject. Thanks again ;-)
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 05:30 am
oops Embarrassed

Sorry, didn't follow that link, Montana.
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au1929
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 09:04 am
Who would have thunk. I am amazed that the lawyers have not gotten hold of this information and started the usual class action suites. Perhaps that would be the only way to get the government agencies to take action.
As far as the general public is concerned I doubt that many are aware of this disturbing information. What mother has not powdered her infants bottom?
0 Replies
 
Montana
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 11:50 am
Walter
No worries ;-)

au
I know that as a mother I truly wish I had this information when my son was a baby. The thing that puzzles me the most is why doctors are not warning people. It's not like they have anything to lose if they inform people of this dangerous product. I have a doctors apointment Friday and I'm going to talk to him about this and I'll let you know what he has to say.
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 12:46 pm
talc or steatite is, itself a massive non fibrous mineral. However it is most often associated with the "six" major asbestiform minerals. In Australia, the largest producer of talc, the mines are in between large vermiculite deposits and are associated with amosite asbestos deposits.

Talc in baby powder is less tha 5% of the market use. Its primary uses are in paper as a filler to help the paper to take TiO2 brighteners and polish (think of the shiny paper in The National Geographic). In the US talc has been pretty much phased out in favor of kaolin clay. However, in the US and Canada, talc is used in poly formulations to enhance recyclability. Sooo, its all over the map . It had been used in food till clays took over for retardation against softening of chocolate or taffies and certain hard candies. Talc is much more used in Europe and Asia for paper and food, and US its plastics. My main product is Titanium and rare earth elements , so I get involved with talc mining from time to time.
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Montana
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 08:21 pm
That's interesting farmerman.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 08:25 pm
I read, a decade ago, that the health issues weren't only about the mineral, talc, but also about the particle size. Powdered cornstarch had the same small particle size and was considered better, but still not good.
0 Replies
 
Montana
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 08:35 pm
oh no. Beth is gonna be bummin :-(
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 08:43 pm
Try this. http://www.cancer.org/docroot/CRI/content/CRI_2_6x_Talcum_Powder_and_Cancer.asp?sitearea=

c.i.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 08:53 pm
I did a search on talc vs. cornstarch and found no concerns about cornstarch at all. Glad to see it.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 09:10 pm
kris - do a google using cornstarch + powder + inhalation


you definitely want to be careful with this product as well

people who have latex allergies should be very cautious about using powdered gloves :
Quote:
Use of powdered latex gloves
Powdered latex gloves contain cornstarch, which acts as a depository for latex protein constituents during the final drying stages of manufacturing. Cornstarch powder promotes aerosolization of latex protein, provoking an inhalation-triggered or touch-transfer allergic response. Inhalation-triggered reactions generally occur in a closed space in which other persons have donned powdered latex gloves and left behind latex microparticles suspended in room air. A touch-transfer reaction occurs when an object (eg, a telephone, a bed rail) touched by someone wearing latex gloves is then touched by a person sensitized to latex.

Dermatologic sensitization remains a threat for persons who wear latex gloves routinely, because Langerhans' cells act as antigen-presenting cells and stimulate an immune response when the skin's natural barrier has been penetrated. Most allergic sensitization occurs when a person with atopy exposed to latex over time inhales latex microparticles on cornstarch powder suspended in the air. Use of low-allergen, powder-free latex gloves reduces aerosolized latex allergen below detection levels and may permit sensitized or allergic personnel to remain employed in the healthcare environment
http://www.postgradmed.com/issues/2003/04_03/muller.htm

Baby Magic
Baby Powder, Cornstarch & Aloe with Baking Soda
8 oz (226 g)
http://www.drugstore.com/qxp25808_333181_sespider/baby_magic/baby_powder_cornstarch_and_aloe_with_baking_soda.htm
Quote:
Ingredients:
Corn Starch, Sodium Bicarbonate, Aloe Vera Gel, Tricalcium Phosphate, Fragrance

Warnings:
For proper use:
Do not use on broken skin.
Keep powder away from face to avoid inhalation.
Carefully shake powder into the diaper or into the hand and apply to diaper area.
Keep out of children's reach. For external use only.


JOHNSON'S® Baby Powder Pure Cornstarch with
Aloe Vera & Vitamin E
http://www.johnsonsbaby.com/products/powder/baby-powder-with-aloe;jsessionid=ZBY1RLN14YMGYCQPCCFS5WYKB2IIQNSC?_requestid=3212
Quote:
Warning
Avoid contact with eyes. For external use only. Do not use on broken skin. Keep powder away from child's face to avoid inhalation, which can cause breathing problems. Close tightly after use.

Ingredients
Zea Mays (Corn) Starch, Tricalcium Phosphate, Aloe Barbadensis, Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Fragrance
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jul, 2003 09:23 pm
Never used it. Whew. Just Vitamin A&D lotion for the sozlet's li'l butt. Great stuff. (As an aside, she is now potty trained, and verrrrry proud of herself.)

Good to know.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Jul, 2003 02:35 pm
She should be proud! She is a big girl now. Very Happy
0 Replies
 
 

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