47
   

Ask the A2K cooks!

 
 
Butrflynet
 
  3  
Reply Sat 19 Jun, 2010 07:39 pm
@mismi,
This sounds like a good recipe that would go with your other components:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/rosemary-and-garlic-roast-leg-of-lamb-recipe/index.html

These all sound like variations on the same theme of seasonings:

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~mjw/recipes/meat/lamb/mp-leg-lamb-coll.html

I like the sound of Emeril's recipe the best.

Here's another of Emeril's using the Greek seasoning and grilling rather than roasting the leg of lamb:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/greek-grilled-leg-of-lamb-gyros-recipe/index.html
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Jun, 2010 10:10 pm
@Butrflynet,
The last one was what we did Bfn...Thank you - it was delicious!
ossobuco
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 19 Jun, 2010 10:54 pm
@mismi,
If I want to check out lamb, I won't look at emeril, whatever his name is.

Please, some of us have cookbooks from distant lands, not from a tv studio.

I appreciate your efforts, butryflynet - but food has history.
Butrflynet
 
  5  
Reply Sat 19 Jun, 2010 11:06 pm
@ossobuco,
She asked for a simple, very basic recipe for someone who had not cooked lamb before; not the history of the food.

Mismi, apparently, there is a required pedigree for recipe suggestions now. I'll have to do some nose exercises before I can get mine that high in the air.
0 Replies
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 02:14 pm
Does chutney exist out-side of India ?

ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 02:19 pm
@Pepijn Sweep,
Hi Pepjin - do you mean to purchase? or as a concept?

The idea of spiced/pickled fruit and/or vegetable jams seems common across most cultures.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 02:21 pm
@mismi,
Emeril has some great recipes, doesn't he. He's a well-known chef for a reason. He's good.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 02:23 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:

If I want to check out lamb, I won't look at emeril, whatever his name is.


Emeril Lagasse

You'd be making a mistake if you didn't take him into consideration as a recipe source. Your choice, but also your loss.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 03:29 pm
@ehBeth,
I think Emerils 15 minutes are soon up. However, as Beth says, hes a great chef of a style of cooking.

See how quickly we tired of George PEpin or Bobby Flay or even that southern broad with the whiney voice.Whats er name?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 05:18 pm
I don't watch food tv - not that I wouldn't (well, I'm not sure of that, some of it sounds horrible) but because I don't have a tv. I have looked at his recipes when I google, wasn't knocked over. I may have saved one of them at some point.
But I'll bow to those better acquainted.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 06:38 pm
@Pepijn Sweep,
Pepijn Sweep wrote:

Does chutney exist out-side of India ?


Chutney?
well, it certainly exists in Sydney around Christmas time. Mangoes are in season and there's a frenzy of chutting around my place!!
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 06:57 pm
@ossobuco,
Americas Test Kitchen is one of the best shows about cookery. It deals a lot with the chemistry of cooking and it does really great comparisons of recipes. Its a PBS show and its the tv partner of the nagazine Cook's
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 07:39 pm
@farmerman,
Emeril Lagasse is one of the great American experts and proponents of Cajun and Creole cooking. He's a James Beard award winner. He brought one of the really authentic American styles to public awareness.

I would have loved to go to Commanders Palace in New Orleans when he was cooking there.

There's a great clip on PBS where he's cooking with Julia Child.

I understand some people follow European food trends, but I personally think what's happening in North America in food terms is as interesting, if not more interesting.
ossobuco
 
  0  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 07:41 pm
@ehBeth,
That's nice. I've been following north american regional food trends since at least the mid seventies. Also food trends around the world. I don't always post on all that. You resent that I'm fond of italian food?

Good that you like Emeril. Be happy.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 07:47 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
I won't look at emeril, whatever his name is.

Please, some of us have cookbooks from distant lands, not from a tv studio.


That's nice.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 07:49 pm
@farmerman,
http://video.pbs.org/video/1094273768/

Julia Child - Cajun Cooking with Emeril Lagasse

Shrimp etouffee and a New Orleans crab boil
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 07:59 pm
@ehBeth,
I ate at Chez Pauls when Paul Prudhomme was healthy, cooking, and several hundred pounds lighter. He used to make a "braised rabbit" in a wine reduction with redbeets. It wa so great that I ate it 3 nights in a row once.

NAwlins cookin and creole has always been my weak spot. Because the area is (was) surfeited in every natural flavor and foodstuff that the water can supply, it was a focus for a cuisine that is unique to the Acadee' and Cajuns. We once followed a tip from one of the soux chefs at Antoines in Nawlins about a restaurant in French part of Atlantic Canada. It was inCHatham that we found the "Fine Grob su Mer' and ate foods that were a base from which a Cajun dish of similar ingredients was born.
Food evolution is interesting too.

I think that many people are just "turned off" by Emerils schtick. You have to wade through that and listen to his cooking tips and recipes. I always liked him for his bold sense of spices and flavor. Hes a master at complex sauces.
Every nation and small area has some kind of neat cooking tricks(even Minnesota).If I ever hadda put my all time favorite style of cooking , it would either be Vietnamese French or Cajun from Nawlins.

WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE CARB CAKE (best in the worid) is the crab cake made in any Eastern Chesapeake SHore dive and prepared under Sen Barabara Mikulskis recipe)
I would post this recipe if there was interest but the ingredients involve ONLY blue crab lump meat (no Jonah or mitten or Dungeness crab) and NO claw meat. ( crab claw meat is the favorite snack of bars in the Chesapeake bars along the water.)

Did ya ever notice that there are a lot of really HOT looking female cooks on these afternoon cooking shows on Food Channel or Fine Living? Most of them make Italian stuff and theres no sense that good italian gravies take days not minutes to prepare? So, I love to watch some of these cookies but I dont usually listen to anything they say.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 08:01 pm
@ehBeth,
I agree that was snotty, and sorry about it, especially to butrflynet who virtually always tries to be helpful. There is a chasm there, to be explored. Not all cooks like the tv extravaganza folk, maybe that's news. Yes, I did love Cav, if that is a question.

And not all non-tv show chefs/cooks post or write complicated recipes all the time..

I am figuring some of my distaste is re videos. I know I've probably linked Bittman or others, but videos are in my way. I can hardly click on any general news thing but see a video, often ad first, blaring at me. Just give me the recipe, or what is going on in the world. I also admit they need to do that, re money.

I did buy some of Emeril's tomatoes at some biggish type price. Poo. I don't remember if I threw them out. From here, I see him as a commercial twit. I admit freely this could be wrong.

I do know who Beard is. I have some of his early paperbacks. Are you saying Beard would like Emeril?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 08:05 pm
@farmerman,
Ah, that helps, re anti italian.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 08:05 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
Senator Barb's Favorite Crab Cake Recipe

Ingredients:
1 lb. jumbo lump or backfin crab meat
2 slices white bread
1 tbsp. mayonnaise (light or regular)
1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
2 tsp. Old Bay or Wye River seasonings
1 tbsp. snipped parsley (optional)
1 egg (or substitute for special diets)
tartar sauce or cocktail sauce

Directions:
Beat the egg in a bowl. Trim the crusts from the bread and break the slices into small pieces. Add these pieces to the egg. Mix in the mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, Chesapeake seasoning and parsley, and beat well.

Place the crabmeat in a bowl and pour the egg mixture over the top. Gently toss or fold the ingredients together, taking care not to break up the lumps of crabmeat.

Form the cakes by hand into patties about 3 inches around and 3/4-inch thick. Shape should be like a cookie, not like a meatball or golf ball. Place the cakes in the refrigerator for at least 45 minutes before cooking. This is very important so the cakes don't fall apart.


Broil the Crab Cakes:
Slip them under a preheated broiler until nicely browned, turning to cook evenly, about 4 to 5 minutes on each side.


Or saute:
Heat a small amount of butter or olive oil in a skillet and saute the cakes, turning several times, until golden brown or about 8 minutes total cooking time.


Serve at once with tartar sauce, mustard, or cocktail sauce on the side.

Serves 6 people
0 Replies
 
 

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