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Ask the A2K cooks!

 
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 07:33 pm
GENERALLY CLUELESS

Nothing to add right now, but great idea for a thread. Oh OK and a small

FREEZING PESTO

comment...

I got a big huge chunk of fresh basil from a friend last summer, made pesto out of it and put "servings" (I made a triple batch) into separate small ziploc bags, squeezing to get extra air out. Have eaten two, they both were good. Last one is still in there.

(Can't people just search pages? Control + F, etc.?)
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 07:45 pm
msolga wrote:
KAFFIR LEAVES substitute:

While osso's searching for that recipe, here's another question:

A substitute for Kaffir leaves, please?
(You know, you have everything required for a particular recipe, just one ingredient missing! Rolling Eyes I mean you can't have everything in your kitchen, & if you tried to buy each & every ingredient each time the need for a new one appears, your kitchen would be stuffed full of goodies! Besides, sometimes you might only use a particular ingredient very rarely.)


Lemon myrtle would substitute for kaffir leaves msolga. You wont be familiar with this herb but you may have seen it in The Age a day or so ago. Lemon myrtle is a native Australian leaf herb. I love it with icecream and in sweeter things but it works with fish and other savory dishes.

Quote:



The Age


http://www.theage.com.au/ffximage/2007/01/26/knCHEF_wideweb__470x327,0.jpg
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 07:46 pm
I haven't added butter, except maybe the first time, years ago.. - but this reminds me that it might be nice as a "freshener" to a dish that frozen/thawed pesto was added to. A dollop of butter can freshen up a tomato sauce, to some palettes.

I don't know what you mean about that search, Soz... I can go on about pesto but am an internet fool...
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 07:49 pm
KAFFIR LEAVES -

what is lemon myrtle's latin name, if you know it - yes I can look up, but busy in my closet...
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 07:52 pm
HOW TO SEARCH

You have a mac, right? That makes it easier, because I forget how to do it with a PC. With a mac, click the apple key and "F" (for "find") at the same time. A bar will appear at the bottom of your screen -- type in the word you're looking for. It will then show you where that word is on the page (highlighting it plus shifting the screen to where it is if it's off-screen).
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:16 pm
ossobuco wrote:
KAFFIR LEAVES -

what is lemon myrtle's latin name, if you know it - yes I can look up, but busy in my closet...


Backhousia citriodora. (I think the spelling is correct)

also known as lemon ironwood but thats a less used common name
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:20 pm
sozobe wrote:
HOW TO SEARCH

You have a mac, right? That makes it easier, because I forget how to do it with a PC. With a mac, click the apple key and "F" (for "find") at the same time. A bar will appear at the bottom of your screen -- type in the word you're looking for. It will then show you where that word is on the page (highlighting it plus shifting the screen to where it is if it's off-screen).



With firefox/mozzila

ctrl f brings up a search bar at the bottom of the page. type the word you want in the box and it will be highlighted in the text. The search box turns red when there are no more incidences of that word on the page.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:32 pm
I'm such a google girlie, Soz. I'll try that....
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:33 pm
KAFFIR LEAVES

You can freeze them!
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:37 pm
Crikey!

I've had 3 attempts at posting since dadpad's myrtle post (fascinating, dp! Very Happy ) with no succeess. Just kept getting those messages!

I can't figure out how the rest of you managed it but I couldn't. Confused

Anyway, later .....

Gotta run.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:39 pm
Beg pardon, dadpad, but I'm a latin name person.. I've no clue what lemon myrtle is right now.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:44 pm
Osso - Backhousia citriodora
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:55 pm
TANGENT

Ain't in my book at hand - I'll look further. Let me just guess it's Euc citriodora? Very common around LA... elegant trees, as are E. maculata.

E. glyptostromboides, if I remember it right, was NOT common, at least in LA, and there might be some history there re it's import. When I saw it, I near plotzed, as the tree bark was multicolorful, and the stone in the wall behind it - bouquet canyon stone - was a perfect placement on the UCLA campus now no doubt long gone. But I've loved that tree since then.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 08:57 pm
What is this backhouse stuff?

In the meantime, back to food...
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 03:03 am
ossobuco wrote:
TANGENT

Ain't in my book at hand - I'll look further. Let me just guess it's Euc citriodora? Very common around LA... elegant trees, as are E. maculata.
This annoys me a little, it smack of arrogance. I said it was Backhousia citriodora. I gave you two common names to check with if you arnt going to accept what my answers when you ask then why bother asking!

E. glyptostromboides, if I remember it right, was NOT common, at least in LA, and there might be some history there re it's import. When I saw it, I near plotzed, as the tree bark was multicolorful, and the stone in the wall behind it - bouquet canyon stone - was a perfect placement on the UCLA campus now no doubt long gone. But I've loved that tree since then.


Osso I've never heard of anyone eating leaves from E. maculata (spotted gum) and/or E.citriodora (lemon scented gum). doesnt mean you shouldnt try. Euc citriodora has lovely scents so <shrug> who knows. You would want to do a study of the phytochemicals first though.

E. glyptostromboides is not an eastern seaboard native and I think its also not an Australian native. from memory perhaps papua New Guinea or possibly malaysia (thats just guessing on my part.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 03:15 am
ossobuco wrote:
TANGENT
E. glyptostromboides, was a perfect placement on the UCLA campus now no doubt long gone. But I've loved that tree since then.


Is that Berkley? Are you thinking of metaseqioia glyptostroboides?

There are some E. globulose (blue gum) at Berkly.

Quote:
from google
Your search - "Eucalyptus glyptostroboides" - did not match any documents.


<shrug>
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 03:20 am
http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Back_cit.html


Dried lemon myrtle leaves

Note
The name "lemon myrtle" is also applied to a loosely related species, Leptospermum citratum (Lemon tea tree) from Australia and New Zealand.

Used plant part
Leaves (fresh or dried).

Plant family
Myrtaceae (myrtle family).

Sensory quality
Intensive, refreshing and very, very lemon-like; the odour has been described, without undue exaggeration, as "more lemon than lemon". Taste is similar, very intensive, pleasant and warm.

Main constituents
The leaves contain much essential oil (typically, 4 to 5%), which is made up almost totally of terpenoid aldehyde s: citral (90 to 95%), neral and geranial. Trace constituents are myrcene, linalool, citronellal, cyclocitral and methyl-heptenone.

Origin
The plant is native to Australia; it is a rare plant, restricted to Queensland, and considered endangered. It is cultivated since the early 90'ies. Two close relatives of lemon myrtle are also grown to produce essential oils: anise myrtle (Backhousia anisata) and cinnamon myrtle (Backhousia myrtifolia).

Etymology
See lemon and myrtle.

The genus Backhousia is named after a British botanist, James Backhouse (1794 - 1869). The species name, citriodorus "lemon-scented", is a neo-Latin formation (citrus and odor "scent, smell").


Lemon myrtle features the most refreshing, pure and intensive lemon odour of all spices known to me - including lemon. It's no surprise that Australia sees it as an important crop for the future.

Australian cuisine is young and evolving rapidly; native Australian spices play an important rĂ´le in defining a kind of "national character" (see also Tasmanian pepper). Lemon myrtle leaves are often used to flavour poultry or sea food: Just one or two leaves give a special touch to roasted chicken. Furthermore, lemon myrtle is popular for herbed vinegar (see dill), mayonnaise (see also tarragon) and vinaigrettes.

Australian cooks tend to use lemon myrtle leaves instead of kaffir lime leaves in recipes of South-East Asian origin; yet lemon myrtle's very pure scent does not go so well with the pungent fish pastes and fish sauces of Thailand.

Lemon-like odour is quite common in the plant kingdom and found many different taxa not related at all. Besides lemon and its relatives (citron, lime, kaffir lime), lemon verbena, lemon balm, lemon grass and of course lemon myrtle have the purest lemon scent; lemon grass is distinguished by a most lovely hint of rose flowers. The essential oils of all these plants contain large fractions of terpenoid aldehydes.

Other plants, though citrus-like, cannot be said to mimic lemon fragrance; their essential oils are often dominated by terpene hydrocarbons. An example is ginger; sassafras, though weak, also belongs in this group. The strong-smelling Mexican herb epazote awakes rather different associations ranging from skunk sweat to lemon fragrance; southernwood is a very similar case. Some chemotypes of the chameleon plant display a strong aroma reminiscent to both lemon and orange. Another Vietnamese culinary herb, rice paddy herb, is characterized by a most unusual, tickling lemon flavour.

Lastly, lemon-scented varieties, relatives or cultivars of many common herbs are known; examples include, but are not restricted to, basil, thyme, savory, perilla and eucalypt.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 03:26 am
I have some old lemon myrtle flakes here. If any one wants to try it pm me an address and I'll send you little bagfull.

I mention that it is old because like many herbs it seems to lose some of its "zesty fresness" after a time.

Fresh lemon myrtle has a sorbet/not quite fizzy quality to it.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 03:35 am
Just testing to see if I can post, after some hours of frustration.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 03:35 am
Surprised
0 Replies
 
 

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