47
   

Ask the A2K cooks!

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 06:05 am
@glitterbag,
had food made with em. We always wait till someone finds many uses for these one purpose gizmos.Alton Brown's methods.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 06:44 am
@farmerman,
You're going to need a bigger pie.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 06:54 am
@izzythepush,
Ill make several kinds. I am also required, by tradition, to make pumpkin pies.Those I have pretty much got nailed. Im tired of pumpkin pies , but people only eat em this time of year around here.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 07:02 am
@farmerman,
I know what you mean. I've just finished one, put the last slice surreptitiously into the kid's lunchbox.

I don't use cloves mind, don't like them and I put stem ginger + syrup in. Also I've got no sherry so I used some of this instead.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61ol3a5kL6L._SX385_.jpg
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 07:16 am
@farmerman,
Sorry, this suddenly dawned upon me. Americans tend to have a sweeter tooth than we do. I've got a couple of Texan cookbooks I picked up on holiday. Whenever I use them I use considerably less sugar, usually about a quarter.

You might want to use a bit more sugar, but then again I'm sure you've baked enough apple pies to know how you like them.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 07:32 am
@izzythepush,
crusts we generally leave savory and we always add salt to the sweeties cause it enhances the sweetness without adding more sugar. Thats a German heritage thing with som Spanish side flavors using stuff like chiles in chocolate. The South ern US adores its overly sweet stuff. Pecan pies hurt my teeth. Their heritages include french, Spanish, Scotch/Irish, Slave recipes, and Cajun French.

Canadian sugar butter tarts are about the only rally sweet thing s we like.
margo
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 01:26 pm
That apple pie does sound good!

I've never seen calvados in the shops here (we're a bit south of Normandy). I checked the two big suppliers. The price was eye-watering and you have to order it. They don't keep it in stock.

Perhaps something to look out for when I'm in the UK or France next year.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 01:44 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Canadian sugar butter tarts are about the only rally sweet thing s we like.


Quebec sugar pie or butter tarts?

Quote:
Sugar pie is a typical dessert of the western European countries of Northern France and Belgium; the Canadian province of Quebec, where it is called tarte au sucre; and Midwestern United States states such as Indiana, where it is known as sugar cream pie.


https://www.ricardocuisine.com/en/recipes/19-sugar-pie



Quote:
A butter tart is a type of small pastry tart highly regarded in Canadian cuisine and considered one of Canada's quintessential treats. The sweet tart consists of a filling of butter, sugar, syrup, and egg, baked in a pastry shell until the filling is semi-solid with a crunchy top


https://www.joyofbaking.com/ButterTarts.html

the crunchy top is how you can quickly see the difference

https://www.joyofbaking.com/images/buttertarts.jpg


butter tart


sugar pie

https://images.ricardocuisine.com/services/recipes/260x351_19.jpg

___

I can't handle sugar pie. One butter tart with a giant mug of tea - once or twice a year - is good (unless Thomas is visiting).
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 06:29 pm
@ehBeth,
oh , It is the butter tart. Its got that sweet caramelly taste with great butter overnotes.
I was out fishing with some buddies and we were in the Algonquin waters . We were eating butter tarts like cupcakes and drinking Ginger Beer and Mountain Dew (some of us would flavore the gunger beer with scotch ). I proposed shooting those who'd mix Mountain Dew with Dewars
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 06:42 pm
@farmerman,
ok
butter tarts
we can be friends
Laughing
the crispy slightly burnt ones are the best - the most caramelly tasting
joeblow is a great enabler when it comes to finding good butter tarts

sidenote : Ontario has become home to a crazy number of butter tart festivals. guaranteed to lead to a sugar coma after the rush lets you donw
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 06:51 pm
@ehBeth,
Yeh, The Algonquin waterway , chain of lakes where we canoed and stopped at several tiny villages at local stores /restaurants, to buy butter tarts and food (They would try to sell us SAAH ' v'neers, when whhat we needed was lard to fry the fish and veggies , and BUTTER TARTS of course
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 06:54 pm
@ehBeth,
where are these butter tart festivals ??? Are they all over or regional?? (In Pa we have PASTY FAIRS that are usually in the coal mining regions where the Welsh and Slovak miners settled)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 07:13 pm
@farmerman,
Many of the butter tart festivals seem to be in the Kawarthas though they can be found all around the province.

then there is this brilliant thing

http://buttertarttour.ca


(apparently there is a fight about which butter tart tour is THE tour - I'm going with the Kawarthas as that's where Canada's award-winning butter comes from)
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 07:55 pm
@farmerman,
I had to google butter tarts....I think I've only experienced butter tarts once, and it was like a teeny tiny pecan pie about the size of a quarter. One bite was terrific, but they are way too sweet for me. My grandmother used to buy lemon, peach, blueberry,and apple tarts at the Cross Street Market and the Lexington Market in Baltimore. The pastries were wonderful, I loved the 'smearcase' a rectangular cheesecake with just a dusting of nutmeg, it was very popular in Baltimore. She also bought all the meats and produce cheeses and lunchmeat for the week (This was before the "supermarkets" arrived) Enough of all that, that was many years ago when my tastebuds were newish)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 08:04 pm
@glitterbag,
had to look smearcake up

http://oldlineplate.com/post/150755436071/elizabeth-ellicott-leas-smearcase

that's what I'd call German cheesecake - not the slimy cheesecake you find in North America - it's traditionally made with quark (a cousin of cottage cheese)

http://oldlineplate.com/post/165029753831/smierkase-cake-smearcase-cheesecake
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 10:52 pm
@ehBeth,
My parents grew up in Baltimore city, Dad born 1917 and Mom 1922. My mothers family was a huge mass of Irish folks who may have arrived in the 1860's, My Dads's father was from Dublin......Baltimore City was a hodgepodge of ethnic cultures..Greek Neighborhoods, Polish, German, Irish, Italian as well as many Catholic, Episcopalian, Lutheran Churches and Temples. They had access to diverse market places, and the food was wonderful. The children my parents are up with from all the neighborhoods attended the same Catholic or public schools. So the kids played together, they were in and out of each others homes. I'm talking blue collar families, that attended each others weddings, bar mitzvahs, baptisms and wakes.

So all the food terms were homogenized so the different native speakers would understand. Smearcase is Baltimorese for schmierkasn.. We learned early what a good cruller should taste like, how to know when pierogies are authentic, also Moussaka, Souvlaki, my Grandmothers Corned Beef and cabbage, sauerbraten and dumplings.........far too many to remember. Back then the terms were homogenized.....now the food had been dumbed down.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 11:04 pm
@glitterbag,
The absolute best bakery in Baltimore for smearcase and peach cake is the Fenwick bakery almost an hour away from me. Peach cake is really more like a large tart...a rectangular tart..it's only made when peaches are in season...its wonderful.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2018 01:49 am
I'm baking a birthday cake today. I bake the cake and the kid decorates it. I'm baking a chocolate cola cake that will be decorated to look like Rick from Rick and Morty.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2018 04:32 am
@glitterbag,
There was a bakry down near Fells Point that made two typs of cheesecake, one was the dryr "farmer cheese" style and the other, my fv , the Jewish (Shumsky Brothers) two layer with the top layer of sour creme based cheese. OY VIT A CUPPA HOT COFFEE YOU SHOULD EAT IT.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2018 04:34 am
@ehBeth,
I looove the "Slimy cheesecake" if thats what the Jewish two layer jobby is what you mean.
 

Related Topics

Cooking shortcuts - Discussion by chai2
In Defense of Chopped Liver - Discussion by Thomas
Smackdown: Leftovers -- yay or nay? - Question by boomerang
Turkey roasting alternatives? - Question by Banana Breath
Cooking for a single guy - Question by Baldimo
OMG! Now I Know What Crabby Snacks Are - Discussion by hawkeye10
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Ask the A2K cooks!
  3. » Page 91
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/20/2019 at 02:50:04